Fire Earth

Mass die-offs from human impact and planetary response to the assault could occur by early 2016

Archive for May 12th, 2010

Gulf of Mexico Oil Leak – Latest Modis Image

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

Oil Leak Disaster in the Gulf of Mexico


MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite took the above image on Tuesday p.m.  local time, May 11. Image shows significant amounts of oil in the Gulf of Mexico as a result of the ongoing leak from the damaged  Deepwater Horizon oil well. Image and caption: NASA E/O. [edited for brevity.] Click image to enlarge.
Download large image (815 KB, JPEG)

Latest News Headlines:

BP is attempting to maneuver its “small top hat” containment dome over the wellhead leak on Wednesday, May 12.  BP officials have no idea whether it will work.

“The ‘top hat’ was lowered to the seabed floor last night and is presently… in the immediate area of the leak and the plan is to have that positioned over the leak and functioning by the end of the week,” BP spokesperson Bryan Ferguson told AFP.

NOAA’s Magic Reduces the Oil Spill [at least diagrammatically]

While BP’s chances of stopping the leak aren’t that good right now, NOAA has managed to reduce the spill marks electronically. See image below and previous images posted.

Another euphemistic, watered-down 72-Hour Trajectory Map of the Oil Spill in the Gulf? Click image to enlarge (PDF file)

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Posted in deepwater drilling, Deepwater Horizon, environment, gulf of mexico, gulf of mexico oil leak, Gulf of Mexico oil Spill | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Latest Landslide Locations

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

Pakistan

A landslide, which killed at least 20 people in the remote Himalayan region of Northern Pakistan on January 4, blocked the Hunza river creating a steadily rising lake.

The water level in the lake has risen to more than 100 meters (323 feet), and is still rising.

“About 1,700 people have been forced to flee their homes after flooding swept Ayeenabad and Shishkat villages in the district of Hunza, wiping out dozens of houses about 750 kilometers (467 miles) north of Islamabad.” AFP reported.

The looming disaster also threatens Gulmit, a tourist resort near the main Karakoram Highway, which connects Pakistan and China.

“We are expecting water from the 15 kilometer-long lake to reach the spillway by May 27 and then (overflowing) will begin,” local official Asif Bilal Lodhi told AFP.

The army engineers are working around the clock to build a spillway to avert a looming disaster, however, their work will take at least 15 more days to complete.

Hunza river landslide lake


ASTER on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this false-color image of the landslide lake on the Hunza River on May 2, 2010. Blue indicates water, red indicates vegetation, and shades of beige and gray indicate bare rock. The approximate extent of the lake on March 16, 2010, appears as a white outline. Image and caption: NASA E/O [edited for brevity.]

India

Two massive landslides triggered by torrential rains have blocked National Highway 44 at Sonapur in Meghalaya, India, and several other roads, causing major disruptions to road traffic to Tripura, Mizoram and southern Assam, according to several reports.

Canada

A giant sinkhole described as “four times larger than a football field”  swallowed a house killing 4 members of a family including two children.

The landslide occurred near in the outskirts of Saint-Jude, Quebec, near a tributary of the Yamaska River (50 kilometers outside of Montreal), damaging a two-lane road and prompting the evacuation of five other houses nearby.

Local geologists suggested that the landslide was a  “lateral spread,” described as sideways landslide.

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Posted in environment, Hunza river, lateral spread, Montreal Sinkhole, Saint-Jude Landslide | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Plane Crash Kills 104 in Libya

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

BREAKING NEWS

The Afriqiyah Airways flight from Johannesburg to Gatwick, UK, crashed in Libya, killing at least 104 people on board

The Airbus 330 carried at least 93 passengers, and 11 crew. Most of the passengers are believed to have been British and South African nationals, while the crew were reported to be Libyans.


Afriqiyah Airways Airbus A330 – 200 like the one that crashed in Tripoli earlier today. Source: Afriqiyah Airways website. Image may be subject to copyright.

“Afriqiyah Airways announce that our flight 8U771 had an accident during landing at Tripoli International airport,” the airline said on its website.

“At this moment we have no information concerning possible casualties or survivors. Our information is that there were 93 passengers and 11 crew aboard. The competent authorities are conducting the search and rescue mission.”

The initial news of the crash was released by Al Arabiya television, citing official sources, Reuters said.

The statement posted on the airline’s website reads:

Afriqiyah Flight 771 crash

Afriqiyah Airways ,Announce that our flight 8U771 had an accident during landing at Tripoli International airport at 04:00 UTC. (06:00 AM Tripoli time) Today Wednesday 12 May.

At this moment we have no information concerning possible casualties or survivors. Our information is that were 93 passenger and 11 crew aboard. The competent authorities are conducting the search and rescue mission.

Further statements will be announced in due course.

UPDATE 12 MAY 2010 – 11:00UTC

  • Sixty-one of the passengers were Dutch nationals
  • A Dutch boy is said to be the sole known survivor (unconfirmed reports, however, Libyan Transport Minister was quoted as saying that the Dutch boy was being treated for minor injuries).
  • Relative seeking information on passengers should contact: From Libya:0213341181 AND Intrnational:+44 203 3552737 Afriqiyah Airways website said.
  • The cause of crash is as yet unknown, however, a Libyan security official told news agency AFP: “It exploded on landing and totally disintegrated [very close to the runway.]“
  • Weather at the time of crash was “sunny and clear ” report say.
  • The air distance between Johannesburg and Tripoli is 6,730km (4,181 miles).

Utter carnage

Rescue teams search the site of the Libyan Afriqiyah Airways plane crash in Tripoli, Libya Wednesday, May 12, 2010. A Libyan Afriqiyah Airways plane with 104 people on board crashed on landing Wednesday at the airport in the Libyan capital Tripoli and a search and rescue operation was under way, the airlines said. (AP Photo/Abdel Meguid al-Fergany). Image may be subject to copyright. See FEWW Fair Use Notice.

Airbus Crash Stats

If you really have to fly because your life depends on it [sic,] and if you are flying an Airbus, then fly on odd days of the month because the Airbus is statistically twice more likely to crash on even days!

Shame on Google, Shame!

Fire-Earth Moderators verily believe that some of the victims of the doomed flight might have still been alive today had the  information concerning the safety record of Airbus 330 that is posted on this blog, but is invariably filtered and buried by Google, reached them.

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Posted in air disaster, airbus 330, aviation, plane crash, Shame on Google | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Devils Hole Tsunami and the Pupfish

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

How El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake Generated a Pupfish Tsunami

University of Arizona researchers caught the April 4 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake on videotape. To a group of rare, critically endangered, inch-long fish that is believed to exist only in “Devils Hole,” a crack in the ground in Nevada’s Mojave Desert, the quake had unleashed a massive tsunami—Fire-Earth

The following is a news release by the University of Arizona :

‘Tsunami’ video sheds light on struggling pupfish

For the first time, an earthquake was recorded live in Devils Hole, home to the only population of a critically endangered pupfish species

To most people in the southwestern U.S., the April 4 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake felt like a rocking of the ground. But on a group of inch-long fish that exist nowhere else on Earth outside of “Devils Hole,” a crack in the ground in Nevada’s Mojave Desert, it unleashed a veritable tsunami.

Devils Hole Pupfish.Devils Hole pupfish in their natural habitat. Credit: Olin Feuerbacher, University of Arizona

University of Arizona researchers were able to catch the event on cameras installed above and below the water’s surface to monitor the fish’s spawning behavior. It is the first time in decades of research at Devils Hole that an earthquake was captured on video.

The event provided the researchers with a rare opportunity to study how a critically endangered species copes when its confined habitat is shaken up in a dramatic way.

The Devils Hole pupfish spend their lives in what likely is the “smallest habitat of a vertebrate species,” according to UA professor Scott Bonar, who runs a pupfish population recovery program at UA’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment.

That habitat is the “spawning shelf” – a submerged rock surface covered by a mere two feet of water. It’s here that the pupfish feed and go about their breeding activity. The shelf forms the only shallow part of a freshwater pool measuring 10 by 50 feet that marks the entrance to the Devils Hole cave.

The pool provides a window into the extensive carbonate aquifer within the Amargosa Valley groundwater basin. Despite explorations undertaken by cave divers, no one has been able to probe the depths of the Devils Hole cave system, although they are known to plunge beyond 500 feet.

Making waves

On most days, Devils Hole looks like a glassy surface of crystal-clear water, shimmering with an unearthly, iridescent turquoise hue at the bottom of a crack in the rocks 50 feet below ground level.

But on April 4, 16 minutes after the shockwaves arrived in the Mojave Desert 300 miles north of the epicenter near Mexicali in Baja California, serenity gave way to turmoil in the small world of the Devils Hole pupfish.

“The water was sloshing back and forth so hard it splashed against our cameras four feet above the waterline,” said Ambre Chaudoin, a graduate student in fisheries conservation and management with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the UA.

“The quake swept the shelf clean from algae, shuffling the silt and cobble around. Such disturbance can be important because the spawning shelf is less than 13 feet long and 7 feet wide, smaller than many walk-in closets. “

Spawning shelf. Video cameras pointed at the spawning shelf to record pupfish behavior caught the earthquake in the act. Credit: Olin Feuerbacher, University of Arizona

Chaudoin and fellow USGS researcher Olin Feuerbacher, a senior research specialist for the Cooperative, conduct the pupfish monitoring study as part of a joint effort to protect the Devils Hole pupfish population. Under its land grant mission, the UA is tasked with research aimed to learn how the fish might be propagated in captivity and what factors may threaten their survival as a species.

The study is being conducted by the USGS Arizona Fish and Wildlife Cooperative Research Unit and is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in partnership with the National Park Service and the Nevada Department of Wildlife.

Struggling to survive

Devils Hole pupfish numbered about 400-500 until the late 1960s, when the water level in the pool dropped in response to pumping of nearby irrigation wells. Only a U.S. Supreme Court order prevented the shallow spawning shelf from falling dry, thus saving the species from extinction.

Since then, the Devils Hole pupfish have struggled to survive.

Chaudoin and Feuerbacher make the trip from Tucson to Devils Hole twice a month to check on the measuring equipment and download data. They happened to be on location conducting pupfish behavior surveys the day of the April 4 earthquake. Just 10 minutes before the quake struck, they had reconnected the video cameras to their recording position inside the pool.

“The fish begin to move out of the camera’s view as the waves start getting bigger, and then, because of all the sediment being stirred up, you can’t see the fish. As the waves grew stronger, the fish likely moved into deeper waters,” Chaudoin said.

To see video clips, visit the U.S. Geological Survey website.

“Although we knew from water-level records that earthquakes influenced Devils Hole in the past, this is the first time we’ve caught one on video,” said Paul Barrett, a Fish and Wildlife Service biologist who leads the Devils Hole Pupfish Recovery Team. “It may provide great insight into how the wave action cleans the fine silt off of the shelf.”

Although the violent sloshing during the quake washed away algae that are essential to the food web of the critically endangered fish, algae have already grown back substantially, according to biologists.

Spawning pupfish: Canaries in coal mine

“We monitor when the fish spawn and when they don’t, and the environmental factors present at the time,” Chaudoin said. “We keep track of certain physical parameters in the water, such as oxygen and temperature. We also study the influence of day and night light cycles on the fish’s behavior.”

Disentangling the complex interactions between environmental factors and the pupfish’s behavior is not a simple task. It appears a combination of several factors, such as oxygen concentration in the water, temperature and length of daylight, all interact to trigger spawning behavior.

“Our goal is to monitor all these factors on an ongoing basis so we can obtain a continuous record,” Feuerbacher said. “In the past, research at Devils Hole has focused on personal observations and measurements taken at certain times, which gives you only snapshots of what is happening at those times.”

Chaudoin added: “The implications of the studies at Devils Hole reach far beyond protecting these little fish. In a sense, they are canaries in a coal mine. Because this habitat is so isolated and contained, we notice changes right away. In a sense, it’s a living lab where we can study food webs and ecology, and the lessons we learn help us protect other habitats as well.”

Quakes with a purpose

“Quakes can serve a useful purpose in shaking silt and other fine particles that have washed into Devils Hole off of the spawning shelf and into the deeper waters,” said Barrett. “This frees important space between the substrate particles where the Devils Hole pupfish larvae seek refuge.”

In fact, he added, after the April 4 Mexicali quake, the National Park Service recorded a slight increase in larval abundance as compared to a similar survey a few weeks before the earthquake occurred.

Federal and state surveys done within a week after the earthquakes revealed about 118 fish in the pool, compared to about 70 the year before. Also, biologists saw newly hatched larval fish and evidence that the fish were spawning.

Despite increasing numbers, the population is still critically endangered, mostly because no fish exist outside of Devils Hole. In 2006, the population plummeted to a critical low of just 38 fish.

“Devils Hole was very important in the development of endangered species legislation in the U.S.,” said Bonar. “Our part is to try and understand Devils Hole pupfish behavior, especially spawning and feeding, and the factors that influence those behaviors. Only with this knowledge can we successfully create a backup population and ensure the proper protection of this unique, endangered species.”

Chaudoin observed that after previous disturbances, for example an earthquake in Chile and violent winter rain storms, the fish exhibited higher spawning activity than usual: “They were going crazy the next day.”

Chaudoin and Feuerbacher do not like to speculate but they are intrigued by the idea that disturbance might play an important role in triggering or influencing the fish’s spawning behavior. Chaudoin is investigating this question in a side project.

“There is a possibility they might like disturbance,” she said. “Perhaps the video recordings will reveal something in the aftermath of the April 4 earthquake. I’m going to spend all my nightlife watching hours and hours of video and extracting data from it.”

One of the questions the researchers are hoping to answer is whether natural disturbances, such as earthquakes, are a threat or a boon to the pupfish population.

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Posted in Desert Fish, Earthquake Hazard, Earthquakes, environment, Salton Sea Basin | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Galactic Metropolis – Latest Images from the Past

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

Just a reminder of what 99.99 percent of us would miss

What is out there, in deep space? How much of it is alive? How much illusory? How many of us will survive the looming planetary collapse to learn more about the stars?

Stellar Nursery in the arms of NGC 1672


The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, showing up clusters of hot young blue stars along its spiral arms, and clouds of hydrogen gas glowing in red. Delicate curtains of dust partially obscure and redden the light of the stars behind them. NGC 1672′s symmetric look is emphasized by the four principal arms, edged by eye-catching dust lanes that extend out from the center. Source: NASA/ESA

Galactic Metropolis

A surprisingly large collections of galaxies (red dots) stands out at a remarkably large distance in this composite image combining infrared and visible-light observations. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope contributed to the infrared component of the observations, while shorter-wavelength infrared and visible data are provided by Japan’s Subaru telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

Looking out to this distance, the cluster appears as it was 9.6 billion years ago, only about three billion years after the Big Bang. Astronomers were surprised to find such a “modern” cluster at an era when its peers tended to be much smaller, presumably taking billions of more years to collect enough galaxies to reach such a size.

Infrared light from Spitzer at wavelengths of 3.6 and 4.5 microns is displayed in red. Subaru observations of near infrared and visible light with wavelengths of 0.9 and 0.44 microns are rendered in green and blue, respectively. The purple overlay is a calculated measure of overall galaxy density and highlights the high concentration of galaxies in the distant cluster. Source: Spitzer/Caltech. Click image to enlarge.

Illustration of Sculptor Wall

Using observations with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA’s XMM-Newton, astronomers have announced a robust detection of a vast reservoir of intergalactic gas about 400 million light years from Earth. This discovery is the strongest evidence yet that the “missing matter” in the nearby Universe is located in an enormous web of hot, diffuse gas.

This missing matter – which is different from dark matter — is composed of baryons, the particles, such as protons and electrons, that are found on the Earth, in stars, gas, galaxies, and so on. A variety of measurements of distant gas clouds and galaxies have provided a good estimate of the amount of this “normal matter” present when the universe was only a few billion years old. However, an inventory of the much older, nearby universe has turned up only about half as much normal matter, an embarrassingly large shortfall. More from Chandra X-ray Center

This artist’s illustration shows a close-up view of the Sculptor Wall, which is comprised of galaxies along with the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Scientists used Chandra and XMM-Newton to detect the WHIM in this structure by examining the X-ray light from a distant quasar, which is represented in the inset to the upper right. This discovery is the strongest evidence yet that the “missing matter” in the nearby Universe is located in an enormous web of hot, diffuse gas. Credit: Spectrum: NASA/CXC/Univ. of California Irvine/T. Fang Illustration: CXC/M. Weiss

Black holes—gas blowers of the Universe

Supermassive black holes with the mass of many millions of stars have been detected at the centre of many large galaxies. A super-massive black hole acts like a lurking “monster” at the centre of the galaxy which swallows the surrounding material through the intensity of its gravitational pull. X-ray observations indicate that a large amount of energy is produced by the in-fall of matter into a black hole, and ejected in powerful jets. Astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics have now shown that these jets eject matter not only from their host galaxies but even the gas between the galaxy group members. (Astrophysical Journal, May 1st 2010)

Astronomers have long been trying to understand how black holes interact with the environment (the so-called feedback), but to date the process is poorly understood. Observations and simulations have shown that active galaxies transport huge amounts of material with their jets, which are particularly luminous at radio wavelengths, into the intra-cluster gas. Signatures of this “radio-mode feedback” are observed both in radio and in X-rays. More from Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Left  is a false color image of the central region of a galaxy group in X-rays. The jet of matter blown out of the central black hole can be clearly identified by its radio luminosity (overlaid, purple-blue). Credit: Image: S. Giodini/A. Finoguenov/MPE

Little Galaxy with a Tail

The infrared portrait of the Small Magellanic Cloud, taken by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, reveals the stars and dust in this galaxy as never seen before. The Small Magellanic Cloud is a nearby satellite galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, approximately 200,000 light-years away.

The image shows the main body of the Small Magellanic Cloud, which is comprised of the “bar” and “wing” on the left and the “tail” extending to the right. The bar contains both old stars (in blue) and young stars lighting up their natal dust (green/red). The wing mainly contains young stars. The tail contains only gas, dust and newly formed stars. Spitzer data has confirmed that the tail region was recently torn off the main body of the galaxy. Two of the tail clusters, which are still embedded in their birth clouds, can be seen as red dots.

In addition, the image contains a galactic globular cluster in the lower left (blue cluster of stars) and emission from dust in our own galaxy (green in the upper right and lower right corners).

The data in this image are being used by astronomers to study the lifecycle of dust in the entire galaxy: from the formation in stellar atmospheres, to the reservoir containing the present day interstellar medium, and the dust consumed in forming new stars. The dust being formed in old, evolved stars (blue stars with a red tinge) is measured using mid-infrared wavelengths. The present day interstellar dust is weighed by measuring the intensity and color of emission at longer infrared wavelengths. The rate at which the raw material is being consumed is determined by studying ionized gas regions and the younger stars (yellow/red extended regions). The Small Magellanic Cloud, and its companion galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud, are the two galaxies where this type of study is possible, and the research could not be done without Spitzer.

This image was captured by Spitzer’s infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer (blue is 3.6-micron light; green is 8.0 microns; and red is combination of 24-, 70- and 160-micron light). The blue color mainly traces old stars. The green color traces emission from organic dust grains (mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The red traces emission from larger, cooler dust grains.

The image was taken as part of the Spitzer Legacy program known as SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud.

Hubble catches heavyweight runaway star speeding from 30 Doradus


This image of the 30 Doradus Nebula, a rambunctious stellar nursery, and the enlarged inset photo show a heavyweight star that may have been kicked out of its home by a pair of heftier siblings. In the inset image at right, an arrow points to the stellar runaway and a dashed arrow to its presumed direction of motion. The image was taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The heavyweight star, called 30 Dor #016, is 90 times more massive than the Sun and is traveling at more than 400,000 kilometers an hour from its home. In the wider view of 30 Doradus, the homeless star, located on the outskirts of the nebula, is centered within a white box. The box shows Hubble’s field of view. The image was taken by the European Southern Observatory’s Wide Field Imager at the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope on La Silla, Chile. The young star, only one million to two million years old, may have traveled about 375 light-years from its suspected home in R136, the bright star cluster marked by a circle. Nestled in the core of 30 Doradus, R136 is one of the most massive young star clusters in nearby galaxies, containing several stars topping 100 solar masses each. 30 Doradus, also called the Tarantula Nebula, resides roughly 170 000 light-years from Earth, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Instruments at three observatories, including Hubble’s WFPC2 and recently installed Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, have provided tantalising clues that the star was ejected from R136. In the ESO and WFPC2 images, hot stars are represented by the color blue. Hydrogen is in red and oxygen in green. Radiation from the runaway star is making the nebula glow. The Hubble image was taken on June 30, 1995; the ESO image was released in December 2006.  Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Walsh (ST-ECF) Acknowledgment: Z. Levay (STScI). Credit for ESO image: ESO Acknowledgments: J. Alves (Calar Alto, Spain), B. Vandame, and Y. Beletski (ESO). Processing by B. Fosbury (ST-ECF).

Exotic Exoplanet: ‘This Planet Tastes Funny’

An unusual, methane-free world is partially eclipsed by its star in this artist’s concept. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has found evidence that a hot, Neptune-sized planet orbiting a star beyond our sun lacks methane — an ingredient common to many planets in our own solar system.

Models of planetary atmospheres indicate that any world with the common mix of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, and a temperature up to 1,000 Kelvin (1,340 degrees Fahrenheit) should have a large amount of methane and a small amount of carbon monoxide.

The planet illustrated here, called GJ 436b is about 800 Kelvin (or 980 degrees Fahrenheit) – it was expected to have methane but Spitzer’s observations showed it does not. Source: Spitzer/Caltech

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Posted in Exotic Exoplanet, Sculptor Wall, Small Magellanic Cloud, space images, supermassive black holes | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Killer Dust Storms Strike India, Middle East

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

Desertification: A Major Mechanism of Collapse

Killer Dust Storms Wreak Havoc in India, Middle East

On May 7, 2010 a dust storm and squall struck two Indian states of Uttar Pradesh (pop. 192 million) and Bihar (pop. 85 million) killing at least 57.

The following MODIS images show dust storms over a large section of Middle East including Afghanistan and Pakistan, as well as the U.S. State of Washington:

Dust over Syria, Turkey and Iraq

Dust blankets Syria’s Fertile Crescent in this natural-color image from May 11, 2010. The pale cloud of dust masks the farm-lined Euphrates River in the right half of the image and extends to the Turkish border. The dust is blowing east toward Iraq. MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image on the afternoon of May 11.  Daily images of Syria are available from the MODIS Team. Image and Caption: NASA E/O [edited for brevity.] Click image to enlarge. Download large image (4 MB, JPEG)
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Dust Storm over Afghanistan and Pakistan

On May 5, a thick band of dust extended along hundreds of kilometers of the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. This photo-like image, taken by MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite, shows the southernmost portion of the plume. The large image shows the entire plume over a broader region. The dust is thick enough to hide the ground from view. It is not clear from this image where the dust is coming from, but dry wetlands in this region are a common source of dust. One such wetland, the Hamun-i-Mashkel is in the lower left corner of the image. The dried wetland is a lighter shade of brown than the surrounding desert. Image and Caption: NASA E/O [edited for brevity.]
Click image to enlarge. Download large image (732 KB, JPEG)

Spring Dust Storm in Washington

A dark plume of dust extends across nearly half of Washington state in these natural-color images from May 3, 2010. MODIS acquired the image from NASA’s Terra satellite at 12:40 p.m. local time.Image and Caption: NASA E/O [edited for brevity.]
Click image to enlarge. Download large 12:40 p.m. image (281 KB, JPEG)

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Serial No 1,712. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).

Posted in desertification, dust storm in India, Dust Storms in Middle East, Mechanism of Collapse, squall | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Eyjafjallajökull Eruption UPDATE – Latest MODIS Image

Posted by feww on May 12, 2010

Eyjafjallajökull Volcano: NO Immediate Plan to Cease Activity

Eyjafjallajökull continues to erupt with no major changes detected in its  activity.  There is no sign that the volcano could cease activity any time soon: IMO

The Plume is currently reaching a maximum height of about 6,000m (20,000) a.s.l., IMO report said.


This natural-color image of the ongoing eruption was acquired by MODIS aboard NASA’s Terra satellite at 12:15 p.m. local time. Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull Volcano continues to erupt a thick plume of ash. On May 11, 2010, the ash was streaming almost directly south, visibly extending at least 860 kilometers (530 miles) from Eyjafjallajökull. The ash clouds forced the closure of some Spanish and Moroccan airports. Image and Caption: NASA [Edited for brevity.] Click image to enlarge. Download large image (2 MB, JPEG)


Eyjafjallajökull and Gígjökull. Dated 11 May 2010at 10:58 today. Photo Credit: Sigurlaug Hjaltadóttir. Image release by Iceland Met Office (IMO). Image may be subject to copyright. See FEWW Fair Use Notice.

Volcanic Ash Advisory from London Met Office – Issued graphics



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Serial No 1,711. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).


Posted in environment, Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud, Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Icelandic ash cloud, Icelandic volcano | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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