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Sakurajima Ejects Massive Column of Ash

Posted by feww on June 7, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07, 070
.

Volcanic Activity Continues at Japan’s Sakurajima

Sakurajima’s eruption on Friday was the most powerful one at the volcano since last month when the volcano spewed large columns of ash with rivers of lava flowing in the direction of nearby Ibusiki City.

Ash clouds from Mt. Sakurajima explosion reached a height of 4,500 meters,  the second-highest since 1955. A record of 5,000 meters was set in 2013.

Ash fall was reported late Friday evening in areas southeast of the volcano.

One of the most active volcanoes in the world, Sakurajima is located in Kagoshima Bay, southern Kyushu, Japan (about 1,100km WSW of Tokyo). The composite volcano has three peaks: Kitadake, Nakadake and Minamidake (southern peak).

Mt. Sakurajima- kagoshima obsrv 6-6-14
Mt. Sakurajima Eruption on June 6, 2014. Photo credit: Kagoshima Meteorological Observatory

Ongoing Eruptions

Since 1955 the Minamidake crater has been continually active. The ongoing activity includes strong strombolian to ash explosions at least once and as many as 8 times a day.

The volcano was placed under a Level 3 (orange) alert by the Japan Meteorological Agency on March 21, 2012.

Level 3 (orange) alert means the volcano is active (do not approach crater).

A major lava flow in 1914 connected the volcano island  to the Osumi Peninsula on the Kyushu Island.

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Posted in Global Disaster watch, significant events, volcanic ash, volcanism, volcano, Volcano Hazard, Volcano News, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Alaska Flights Grounded amid Continued Activity at Pavlof

Posted by feww on June 5, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIO 07
.

Regional Airline Cancels Alaska Flights

Plumes of smoke, steam and ash from Pavlof continue to reach heights  of about 7,500m (24,000 feet),  according to Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO).

Meantime, PenAir, a regional airline, canceled flights from Anchorage to  Cold Bay and Dutch Harbor on the Aleutian Islands on Wednesday.

pavlof 3jun14
Pavlof eruption with lava fountaining, early June 3, 2014, as viewed from Cold Bay. Photo credit: AVO/ Robert Stacy.

So far, no ash has reached any of local communities, according to AVO.

LAST ACTIVITY REPORT: ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

Thursday, June 5, 2014 5:16 AM AKDT (Thursday, June 5, 2014 13:16 UTC)
UPDATED by FIRE-EARTH at 13:35UTC

PAVLOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312030)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37″ W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Two strong explosions were recorded in seismic data early this morning (10:05 and 10:45 UTC; 02:05 and 02:45 AKDT) at Pavlof. Lightning was detected by the WWLLN system but there is no indication of higher altitude ash in satellite data. Meteorological cloud tops are up to 29,000 ft. ASL and winds are to the west-southwest.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014 12:14 PM AKDT (Wednesday, June 4, 2014 20:14 UTC)

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Seismicity remains stable and unchanged in the past 24 hours. Persistent elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images. FAA web camera views yesterday afternoon showed a towering steam plume above the vent and lower-level ash from pyroclastic flow activity on the north flank. Wind direction has shifted in the past 24 hours to a more westerly direction and recent satellite views show a plume rich in SO2 gas, steam, and minor ash extending variably between 30 and 100 km downwind and passing over Cold Bay. There have been no reports of ash fall in Cold Bay or any other community. Incandescence from lava fountaining was visible in early morning web camera images, however low-level weather clouds obscure more recent views.

Alerts at Other Alaska Volcanoes

  • Shishaldin: Color Code: ORANGE/ Alert Level WATCH
  • Cleveland: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY
  • Veniaminof: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

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Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic eruption, volcanism, Volcano Hazard, volcano images, Volcano News, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Eruption of Pavlof Continues

Posted by feww on June 4, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIO 07
.

Pavlof Eruption Ongoing, Conditions Could Worsen Rapidly: AVO

Intense activity at Pavlov Volcano prompted the authorities to issue a red alert on Monday, the first in five years. The alert level has since been changed to “ORANGE.”

Plume of smoke and ash reached as high as 7,500 meters on Tuesday; however, seismic activity has decreased over the past 12 hours to much lower levels than that of Monday, Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) reported.

“Recent satellite data and web camera views of the eruption plume indicate that there are now two distinct parts of the plume. The part of the plume that reaches high above the volcano appears to be mainly steam and gas with minor ash present, extending south of the volcano. Additionally, pyroclastic flow activity on the north flank is producing diffuse ash emissions that result in areas of hazy air, with variable concentrations of ash below 10,000 ft.”

Ongoing pyroclastic and lahar activity have created hazardous conditions on the north flank and north side drainages heading on the volcano, said AVO, adding that large, more ash-rich plumes could develop with little or no warning.

Pavlof -AVO - 2jun14
Lava fountaining from the summit vent on Pavlof. View is from the southwest. Ash and steam clouds rise up to about 20,000 ft. ASL. Date: June 2, 2014 11:36 AM. Photo credit: AVO/ R. Kremer

Volcano: Pavlof (VNUM #312030)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Previous Volcano Alert Level: WARNING

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Previous Aviation Color Code: RED

Issued: Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 5:54 PM AKDT (20140604/01:54UTC)
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Notice Number: 2014/A8
Location: N 55 deg 25 min, W 161 deg 53 min
Elevation: 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Area: Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

Alerts at Other Alaska Volcanoes

  • Shishaldin: Color Code: ORANGE/ Alert Level WATCH
  • Cleveland: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY
  • Veniaminof: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

Cleveland location map
Location of Cleveland volcano and other Aleutian volcanoes with respect to nearby cities and towns.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

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Posted in Global Disaster watch, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Santa María Volcano Continues to Erupt

Posted by feww on May 11, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07
.

Mass evacuations ordered as  Santa María continues to erupt

Santa María volcano (volcán Santiaguito) is a large active volcano located in the Western Highlands of Guatemala, near he city of Quetzaltenango. The volcano has been eruting since May 9, 2014, forcing the authorities to evacuate hundreds of people.

Lahar races down a river valley near El Palmar

lahar from Santiaguito
Original caption: Image provided by Guatemala’s Prensa Libre Newspaper on May 9, 2014 shows a man watching the volcanic material descending at El Palmar municipalty of Quetzaltenango department in Guatemala. The Santiaguito volcano continues its explosive activity with less intensity, according to technicians of Guatemala’s Disaster Reduction National Coordinator, according to local press. (Xinhua/Prensa Libre)

santiaguito volcano
Santa María volcano erupts. Credit Daniel Leclair/ Reuters

Santa María’s eruption in 1902 is recorded as the fourth largest volcanic explosion of the 20th century with a VEI of 6 ['Colossal'.]

The volcanic ash from the eruption was detected as far away as San Francisco, more than 4,000 km away.

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Sakurajima Volcano Erupts Explosively

Posted by feww on May 11, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07
.

Rivers of of lava and large columns of ash moving in the direction of Ibusiki City

Sakurajima’s eruption on Sunday was the most powerful one at the volcano so far this year.

The explosion ejected a column of ash and smoke to a height of about 4.5km above the Minamidake crater, according to local reports.

One of the most active volcanoes in the world, Sakurajima is located in Kagoshima Bay, southern Kyushu, Japan (about 1,100km WSW of Tokyo). The composite volcano has three peaks: Kitadake, Nakadake and Minamidake (southern peak).

Since 1955 the Minamidake crater has been continually active. The ongoing activity includes strong strombolian to ash explosions at least once and as many as 8 times a day.

The volcano was placed under a Level 3 (orange) alert by the Japan Meteorological Agency on March 21, 2012.

Level 3 (orange) alert means the volcano is active (do not approach crater).

A major lava flow in 1914 connected the volcano island  to the Osumi Peninsula on the Kyushu Island.

There were no immediate report of damage or casualties, as of posting.

Posted in Global Disaster watch, significant events, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano, volcano alert, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Magma Reservoir Re-pressurizing Beneath Mount St. Helens

Posted by feww on May 2, 2014

SEISMIC HAZARD
HEIGHTENED GLOBAL SEISMICITY
VOLCANIC HAZARD
NIGHTMARE SCENARIOS 07, 08
.

Mount St. Helens remains active, but no signs of impending eruption: CVO

The magma reservoir beneath Mount St. Helens has been slowly re-pressurizing over the past 6 years, according to the Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO).

The re-pressurization is probably due to the arrival of a small amount of additional magma some 4 to 8 km  beneath the surface, said CVO.

“Since the end of the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) have been monitoring subtle inflation of the ground surface and minor earthquake activity reminiscent of that seen in the years following the 1980-1986 eruptions. Careful analysis of these two lines of evidence now gives us confidence to say that the magma reservoir beneath Mount St. Helens has been slowly re-pressurizing since 2008.”

The re-pressurization in not unexpected because Mount St. Helens is in an active period, as it has been since 1980, said CVO, adding that there was no indication the volcano could erupt anytime soon.

St Helens 1980 Eruption

The eruption on May 18, 1980, which was heralded by a magnitude 5.2 earthquake, covered an area larger than 600 km² with volcanic matter, destroying entire  forests, killing 57 people and causing about $1.2buillion in property damage.

st helens
Prior to 1980, Mount St. Helens had the shape of a conical, youthful volcano sometimes referred to as the Mount Fuji of America. During the 1980 eruption the upper 400 m (1,300 ft) of the summit was removed by a huge debris avalanche, leaving a 2 x 3.5 km (1.2 x 2.2 mi) horseshoe-shaped crater now partially filled by a lava dome and a glacier. It is primarily an explosive dacite volcano with a complex magmatic system.

Mount St. Helens was formed during four eruptive stages beginning about 275,000 years ago and has been the most active volcano in the Cascade Range during the Holocene. Prior to about 12,800 years ago, tephra, lava domes, and pyroclastic flows were erupted, forming the older St. Helens edifice, but a few lava flows extended beyond the base of the volcano. The bulk of the modern edifice (above the 1980 crater floor) was constructed during the last 3,000 years, when the volcano erupted a wide variety of products from summit and flank vents. Historical eruptions in the 19th century originated from the Goat Rocks area on the north flank, and were witnessed by early settlers. (Source: CVO/USGS)

Volcano Details (CVO)

Location: Washington, Skamania County
Latitude: 46.2° N
Longitude: 122.18° W
Elevation: 2,549 (m) 8,363 (f)
Volcano type: Stratovolcano
Composition: Basalt to Rhyodacite
Most recent eruption: 1980 (May 18), 2004-2008
Nearby towns: Castle Rock, WA; Olympia, WA; Vancouver, WA; Yakima, WA; Portland, OR
Alert Level: Normal (2014-04-30 09:05:42)


Mount St. Helens, Washington simplified hazards map showing potential impact area for ground-based hazards during a volcanic event.

Posted in Global Disaster watch, Seismic Hazard, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic hazard, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mass Evacuation Ordered after UBINAS Eruption

Posted by feww on April 18, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
STATE OF EMERGENCY
MASS EVACUATIONS
.

Ubinas Volcano spews 3.2km-high plumes of toxic ash

Some 4,000 residents and more than 40,000 animals are being evacuated to a “safety zone” about  20km from Peru’s most active volcano.

Villagers are concerned for the health of their livestock, a major source of income. “In the district of Ubinas alone, there are an estimated 40,000 llamas and alpacas.” A significant percentage of these animals could be seriously affected by the silica ash, which  contaminates their grazing areas after each significant eruption, local sources have said.

The silica ash from the  eruption damages crops, polluting water sources, and threatening villagers and their livestock.

“The Ollanta Humala’s administration declared a state of emergency in nearby provinces, which will provide financial assistance for those affected by eruption of the Ubinas volcano, in southern Peru’s Arequipa region,” reported Andina news agency.

A major eruption in 2006 forced mass evacuations and killed livestock that consumed ash-contaminated fodder, said the report.

ubinas
Ubinas Volcano erupted multiple times in September 2013 after three years of dormancy. Image credit: ANDINA

The massive 5,670-meter volcano is located about 70 kilometers from the city of Arequipa (metro pop: ~ 1,260,000), and 1,250km south of the capital Lima, close to the country’s Pacific coast, about  230 km east of the Peru-Chile trench and about 150 km above the Benioff-Wadati plane, where the Nazca plate is subducting under the continental part of the South American Plate.

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Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic event, volcanism, Volcano Hazard, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Tungurahua Eruopts, Baños Evacuated

Posted by feww on April 5, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
.

City of Baños evacuated amid Tungurahua’s spectacular eruption

Tungurahua erupted on Friday, ejecting a massive plume of smoke and ash 10km into the air during a 5-minute episode.

The 5,023-m volcano has been active since 1999, and has shown signs of increased activity since February 1, 2014.

“Throat of Fire,” as it’s known in the in the local Quechua language, is one of nine or so active volcanoes in Ecuador, located about 140 km  south of the capital, Quito.

Fuente F Vásconez - OVT-IGEPNPhoto showing Tungurahua volcano eruption associated with an explosion at 18:10 (local time) on April 4, 2014. Source F. Vásconez – OVT/IGEPN

Baños de Agua Santa

Baños de Agua Santa, or Baños, as it is commonly referred to, is located in central Ecuador on the northern foothills of the Tungurahua volcano. It is the second most populous city in Tungurahua Province with a population of about 10,000.

Volcano Location Map

Tungurahua
Freeze frame from a local news video clip showing Friday’s eruption.

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Sinabung Eruption Leaves 14 Dead, Thousands Evacuated

Posted by feww on February 1, 2014

Sumatra volcano in deadly eruption

Mt Sinabung Erupted three times on Saturday leaving at least 14 people dead, including a group of school children from Medan on a science trip, and three others critically injured. Authorities were again forced to evacuate tens of thousands of people from 16 villages from the 5km – 7km exclusion zone near the volcano.

“This is the first direct impact of the Mt. Sinabung eruptions. Before the Saturday incident, the ongoing eruptions have already claimed the lives of 31 evacuees, as a result of various illnesses such as breathing difficulties, depression, asthma and hypertension.” Jakarta Post reported.

Some 14,000 of more than 30,000 evacuees had just been allowed to return home on Friday, following earlier eruptions.

Sinabung-01022014 -antara news
Villagers flee as Mt Sinabung spews plumes of hot ash and smoke engulfing at least 16 villages. Photo credit: ANTARA /Irwansyah Putra. Image may be subject to copyright. More images…

The volcano became restive in 2010, after more than 400 years of dormancy, and has been erupting sporadically since.


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra could cause the collapse of Singapore. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

mt sinabung
Mt Sinabung erupted explosively again on November 12, 2013 for a second time in 9 days. Image credit: CRIonLine via Xinhua. More images…

Chronology of Recent Eruptions

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Mass Evacuations as Sinabung Erupts Again

Posted by feww on January 8, 2014

Mount Sinabung Continues to Eject Volcanic Materials into the Air

Some 22,000 people living near Sinabung volcano have been evacuated Since Monday after the volcano erupted in North Sumatra, Indonesia.

The volcano is spewing columns of ash and smoke up to 4.5km above the summit crater, authorities said.

sinabung 7jan14
About 22,000 people have been evacuated near Mt Sinabung as the volcano continues to erupt. Mount Sinabung has been ejecting columns of ash and smoke up to 4.5km above the summit crater since Saturday. More than 60 pyroclastic flows extending up to 5 km from the crater have also been recorded. Photo credit: Agung Kuncahya B./Xinhua.  More images…

“The National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) has instructed all relevant ministries, government institutions, local disaster mitigation agencies and the Karo regency administration in North Sumatra to prepare for a worst-case scenario following an increase in Mount Sinabung’s volcanic activity during the past week,” said a report.

The “worst-case scenario” comes into if the exclusion zone is extended from its latest 7km radius, southeast slope of the volcano, to between 7.5 and 10 km from the crater.

More than 60 pyroclastic flows extending up to 5 km from the crater have been recorded with the flow volume increasing every day, said The National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB).

The volume of volcanic material ejected so far is about a quarter of the total 2,540,000 cubic meters formed in Mt. Sinabung’s crater. “This means that the pyroclastic potential stored in the volcano’s lava dome is still substantial; so if it should all come out, the threat would be devastating,” Jakarta post quoted an official as saying.


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra could cause the collapse of Singapore. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Chronology of Recent Eruptions

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic event, volcanism, volcanism report, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mass Evacuation Ordered as Mt SINABUNG Put on Red Alert

Posted by feww on November 24, 2013

18,000 people evacuated as Sinabung activity intensifies

Mt Sinabung’s latest explosive eruption has prompted the authorities to raise the volcanic alert to the highest level, “siaga,” or “red alert,” according to Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Center.

The alert level was raised from “orange” or “level III ” to the highest level “red” or “level IV” by PVMBG on Sunday, as the authorities evacuated an additional  11,618 residents from 19 villages and expanded the evacuation zone to a 5-km exclusion  zone from 3 km previously.

“This is Sinabung’s highest level of activity. The intensity of the eruptions continues to increase,” said Hendrasto, head of PVMBG.

sinabung erupting 24nov2013
Villagers evacuate to a safe area, as Mount Sinabung ejects ash into air at Aman Teran village in Karo district, Indonesia’s North Sumatra province, November 24, 2013. Credit: Reuters/YT Haryono. More images…

As of 2 p.m. local time on Sunday, Sinabung was continuing to eject an 8-km high column of smoke and ash into the air, he said.

Some 6,000 villagers had already been evacuated from the 3-km exclusion zone, about 90 km from Medan, capital of North Sumatra province.

The North Sumatra health has distributed 180,000 face masks, medicine and 4 tons of baby formula to relief posts in Karo regency, reported Jakarta Post.

mt sinabung
Mt Sinabung erupted explosively again on November 12, 2013 for a second time in 9 days. Image credit: CRIonLine via Xinhua. More images…


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.


Mount Sinabung ejected tephra into the air as seen from Tanah Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Dedy Zulkifli). Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Chronology of Recent Eruptions

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano, volcano alert, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Volcano Erupts in Ogasawara Islands

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

Warning issued to Pacific shipping after volcano erupts, forming a new Island

Authorities have warned shipping in the Pacific Ocean to maintain vigilance for airborne volcanic material after a volcano erupted near one of the Ogasawara Islands, some 1,000 kilometers south of Tokyo, NHK reported Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) as saying.

Japan Coast Guard has confirmed black smoke spewing out of a new land mass about 500 meters southeast of Nishinoshima island, JMA said

Video footage shows a plume of black and white smoke and steam  rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new landmass measuring about 200 meters across.

Ogasawara - new island formed from volcanic eruption
Black and white smoke and steam rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new 200-m long landmass created by volcanic eruption near Nishino shima, Bonin Islands, south of Japan. Screenshot from NHK news video clip.

new volcanic island
Screenshot  from NHK news video clip.

“The agency says multiple clusters of white smoke overhead suggest intermittent explosions,” said the report.

Volcanic activity created a new island which was fused to the uninhabited Nishinoshima between 1973 and 1974, the last time when eruptions occurred near the island.


Location Map of Volcano Islands, Ogasawara Islands, Japan region. Image credit: Lim Tor


Bonin Islands (aka, Ogasawara Group, in Japan).  Click Image to Enlarge.

In 2010, one of the volcanoes in the region erupted, spewing smoke and ash to a height of about about 100 meters above the sea level. The surrounding sea area changed to a greenish-yellow color with nearby areas turning cloudy.

JMA said the volcano, called Fukutokuokanoba, had erupted seven times since 1904, forming ephemeral islands (temporary land masses) on three occasions, all of which later sank below the ocean surface.

The first known ephemeral island called Shin-Iwo-jima (New Sulfur Island) was formed in 1904, and the most recent in 1986.

What the Volcano Islands Look Like


North Iwo Jima Island (Official Japanese name Kita-iōtō, but commonly known as Kita-iōjima, meaning “north sulfur island”) is the northernmost island of the Volcano Islands cluster of the Ogasawara Islands, about 1175 km south of Tokyo. Image Credit: Chisatos

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Posted in significant events, volcanic activity, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcanic event, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcanism report, volcano, volcano alert, volcano eruption, Volcano Hazard, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

World’s Largest Volcano?

Posted by feww on September 8, 2013

Massive Volcano Discovered in NW Pacific Ocean

Researchers have discovered an immense shield volcano on the seabed, northwest Pacific Ocean.

Tamu Massif is said to be the oldest and largest edifice of the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

A single, immense volcano, Tamu Massif is constructed from massive lava flows that erupted from the center of volcano to form a broad, shield-like dome some 145 million years ago.

Researchers writing in the journal Nature Geoscience suggest the 310,000 km² (119,000 mi²) Tamu Massif could be the largest single volcano on Earth, comparable in size only to the Olympus Mons on Mars, believed to be the largest volcano in the Solar System.

Tamu Massif
The Tamu Massif Volcano ~ 32.5ºN, 158.4ºE

Rising 3.5km above the seabed, Massif lies about 2km below the sea, and is rooted more than 30 km into the earth’s crust on the Shatsky Rise, some 1,600 km east of Japan.

“We don’t have the data to see inside them and know their structure, but it would not surprise me to find out that there are more like Tamu out there,” said Dr Sager, one of the researchers at the University of Houston.

“Indeed, the biggest oceanic plateau is Ontong Java plateau, near the equator in the Pacific, east of the Solomons Islands. It is much bigger than Tamu—it’s the size of France.” [Tamu is nearly the size of Norway. Editor]

Key point

“One interesting angle is that there were lots of oceanic plateaus (that) erupted during the Cretaceous Period (145-65 million years ago) but we don’t see them since. Scientists would like to know why.” Sager said.

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, volcanism, volcano, volcano images, Volcano News, Volcano Watch, volcanoes, Volcanology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Indonesia’s Soputan Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on July 3, 2011

Mount Soputan, one of Sulawesi island’s most active volcanoes, erupted again on Sunday

North Sulawesi’s Soputan volcano erupted on Sunday at about 6:00 am local time, ejecting a column of volcanic gases about 6km into the air.

However, no evacuation order was issued as the volcano did not pose an immediate danger, officials said.

“They nearest residents live some eight kilometers from the mountain and so evacuation is not yet necessary [since the current evacuation zone was set at a 6km radius around the volcano, a forested area that is uninhabited,]” spokesman of the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said.

“Last night, at around 11 pm, the mountain entered its eruption phase,” he said.

Mt Soputan is located about 2,160 km (1,340 miles) northeast of Indonesian capital Jakarta. The volcano  had previously erupted in 2008.


Soputan volcano spews thick smoke and heat clouds in Minahasa on October 7, 2008. Source: AFP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesia, which sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire, is home to 150 listed volcanoes, some 109 to 130 of which are regarded as active, according to various sources.


A Map of Listed Volcanoes of Indonesia.

Summary of Volcano Details

Country: Indonesia
Region Name: Sulawesi Island
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 2008
Summit Elevation: 1,784 m    
Location
:     1.108°N, 124.73°E

Soputan on a restful day!


The small Soputan stratovolcano, seen here from the west, was constructed on the southern rim of the Quaternary Tondano caldera in northern Sulawesi Island. The youthful, largely unvegetated Soputan volcano is one of Sulawesi’s most active volcanoes. During historical time the locus of eruptions has included both the summit crater and Aeseput, a prominent NE flank vent that formed in 1906 and was the source of intermittent major lava flows until 1924. Photo (undated) by Agus Solihin (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Image and caption: GVP.

Pacific Ring of Fire

The Pacific Ring of Fire is an area of frequent siesmic activity and volcanic eruptions caused by plate tectonic movements. Encircling the basin of the Pacific Ocean, which contains oceanic trenches, volcanic arcs, and volcanic belts, the 40,000 km Ring of Fire is home to 452 volcanoes. About ninety percent of the world’s earthquakes including 80% of the world’s major earthquakes occur along the Pacific Ring of Fire.


Volcanic arcs and oceanic trenches partly encircling the Pacific Basin form the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, a zone of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The trenches are shown in blue-green. The volcanic island arcs, although not labeled, are parallel to, and always landward of, the trenches. For example, the island arc associated with the Aleutian Trench is represented by the long chain of volcanoes that make up the Aleutian Islands. (Source: USGS.)

Other Volcanic Activity/ Unrest

[Source: Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for June 22 - 28]

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Afar Triangle Volcano Erupts as Forecast

Posted by feww on June 14, 2011

Correction: Nabro Volcano in Eritrea Erupts Ejecting a 15-km Plume of Ash into the Atmosphere

Following a swarm of Earthquakes that struck within the Afar Triangle Eritrea, Ethiopia, yesterday, FIRE-EARTH said:

… there’s a strong probability that the quakes may have primed one or more regional volcanoes for eruption.

Nabro Volcano erupted around midnight Sunday local time, ejecting  a 15-km plume of ash into the air, reports said.

The volcano, which is located about 375 km southeast of the Eritrean capital Asmara, sits within the Afar Triangle, a tectonic triple junction.


Nabro volcano, Eritrea, sits close to the border with Ethiopia.  Credit: ESA/NASA.  Click image to enlarge.


Nabro eruption is captured in this photo-like image by  MODIS on the Aqua satellite on June 13, 2011. “Initial reports from news agencies and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center in Toulouse, France, proclaimed the eruption to be occurring at Dubbi, a volcano further south. But later reports from volcanologists, field scientists, and the satellite image above appear to confirm the eruption at Nabro. There are no historical reports of eruptions at Nabro before today.” Image and caption: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge. Download largest image (4 MB, JPG)

The fact that there was no historic record of eruption at Nabro volcano may explain why the French VAAC got it wrong initially, attributing the eruption to the Dubbi volcano – EDRO

Nabro Volcano
Country: Eritrea
Region: Northeastern Africa
Previous Known Eruption: NOT KNOWN
Summit Elevation: 2,218 m (7,277 ft)
Coordinates : 13.37°N, 41.70°E
Source: GVP

Nabro Volcano Space Shuttle image


The large caldera below and to the left of the center of this Space Shuttle photo of the Danakil Alps of Ethiopia is Nabro. The 2218-m-high Nabro stratovolcano is the highest volcano in the Danakil depression and is truncated by nested calderas 10 and 5 km in diameter. The larger caldera is widely breached to the SW. Nabro was constructed primarily of rhyolitic lava flows and pyroclastics. The 8-km-wide Mallahle caldera is at the lower left, and the dark-colored lava flows at the right are from Dubbi volcano. NASA Space Shuttle image S-61A-36, 1985. Caption: GVP


Nabro (top) and  Mallahle (bottom) volcanic calderas. This false-color topographical image of the two volcanoes was produced by NASA. Click image to enlarge.

Map of East Africa showing some of the historically active volcanoes (red triangles) and the Afar Triangle (shaded, center)— a so-called triple junction (or triple point), where three plates are pulling away from one another: the Arabian Plate, and the two parts of the African Plate (the Nubian and the Somalian) splitting along the East African Rift Zone. Source: USGS


A map showing the approximate location of Nabro and Dubbi Volcanoes. The yellow circles mark the epicenters of the recent quakes that struck the area. Red stars are the two largest shocks in the swarm measuring 5.7Mw. Click image to enlarge.

The huge ash cloud ejected by the volcano is said to be moving across the Horn of Africa, threatening air travel. The German airline Lufthansa said on Monday it had cancelled two flights, one a flight out of the Eritrean capital Asmara, and the other into Addis Ababa.

The ash plume also forced the U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to curtail her visit to the region. Ironically, Obama was forced to abandon his visit to Ireland when Iceland’s Grímsvötn volcano erupted last month.

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Updated on June 14, 2011 at 07:58UTC by EDRO
Updated on June 14, 2011 @ 12:01UTC by FEWW

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Earthquake Swarm Rattles Buller Mountain

Posted by feww on May 1, 2011

Hundreds of small- to medium-sized quakes strike near Hawthorne, Nevada


A large swarm of earthquakes has rattled the Buller Mountain area near Hawthorne, Nevada since March 5, 2010. At least 400 small- and medium-sized earthquakes measuring between M1.0 and M4.6 have struck a 10 sq km area since April 10., NASA-EO reported.  “This map shows earthquake locations (white circles) from March 5, 2011, through the early morning of April 27, superimposed on a natural-color satellite image from September 19, 2002…  Several abandoned mines are visible as bright scars on the landscape, and the lava flows of Mud Springs Volcano are dark gray. The image was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) aboard Landsat 7. ” The earthquake swarm is said to be tectonic in origin. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.  Download largest image (3 MB, JPEG) 

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Mount St. Helens: “The Ides of March?”

Posted by feww on February 17, 2011

VolcanoWatch Weekly [17 Feb 2011]

Shinmoedake Update:

Some 2,500 people living near Shinmoedake volcano on Japan’s Kyushu island were advised earlier today to evacuate their homes after heavy rain threatened lahar avalanches, reports say.

VoW: Mount St. Helens


Mount St. Helens and Spirit Lake, as seen from Bear Cove. Image Source: U.S. Forest Service via USGS/CVO.


Phreatic eruption of Mount St. Helens, March 28, 1980, as seen from the north. Image by C.Dan Miller, USGS/CVO

Mount St. Helens, Washington  Ash Plume Path May 18, 1980


Click image to enlarge.

Mount St. Helens Volcano
Position: 46°12′ N 122°10’48″ W,
Summit Elevation: 2,549 m (8,363 ft )
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN
Source: USGS/CVO

Recent observations:

An M4.3 earthquake struck the Mount St. Helens region this morning, 14 February 2011, at 10:35 a.m. PST (18:35 UTC) and was felt widely through southwestern Washington and Northwestern Oregon (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/events/uw/02141835/us/index.html). Its exact magnitude may change by a few tenths from this value as records are further analyzed. The earthquake was followed by several aftershocks up to M2.8 over the next few hours (http://www.pnsn.org/recenteqs/latest.htm), the three largest of which were also reported felt. All of the earthquakes are located in an area about 8 kilometers (5 miles) north of the crater of Mount St. Helens, near the Johnston Ridge Observatory, at a depth of about 4 to 6 kilometers (2.5 to 4 miles).

Today’s earthquakes are in the same place as a small swarm that took place about two weeks earlier, on 29 January. These earthquakes are reminiscent of a swarm that took place about 30 years ago, when a swarm of small earthquakes began in August 1980, a few miles northwest of today’s activity. The 1980-1981 sequence climaxed with an M5.5 earthquake on 14 February 1981. Analysis of the 1981 events suggested that they occurred along existing faults in the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, a northwest to southeast trending system of faults in which Mount St. Helens lies. The Mount St. Helens seismic zone exhibits strike-slip motion, with the southwestern rocks slipping horizontally northwest relative to the rocks northeast of the fault zone. The fault zone likely exerts control on the location of Mount St. Helens volcano. Studies following the 1980 eruption suggested that the magma removed during the May 1980 eruption and subsequent lava-dome building caused faults along the seismic zone to slip in response to the magma withdrawal. Similar interaction of volcanic activity and tectonic fault movement is possible in the case of today’s earthquakes, but at present there appears to be no signs of unrest in the volcanic system.  USGS/Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Washington

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report – 9 February to 15 February 2011

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest:

Map of Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

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FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Japan’s Shinmoedake volcano erupts for a 2nd day

Posted by feww on January 27, 2011

Mt Shinmoedake continued to eject tephra Thursday

Shinmoedake volcano in southern Japan, which began erupting on Wednesday, ejecting rocks, ash and smoke about 4,600m  into the air, was still erupting on Thursday.

Local highways and railroads have become impassable as a result, and at least 4 flights to the area have been canceled as a precaution, reports say.


Shinmoedake volcano continued erupting for a second day on Thursday. Freeze frame from ITN news clip.

Shinmoedake Volcano Erupts


Natural-color satellite image of Shinmoedake volcano  captured by MODIS aboard NASA’s
Terra satellite on January 26, 2011. Shinmoedake is a volcano in the Kirishima volcanic complex on Japan’s Kyushu island. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.


Lightening is photographed using time exposure during an eruption from Mt Shinmoedake in the Kirishima volcanic complex on the border of Kagoshima and Miyazaki prefectures, southern Japan. Photo:  Shuji Uchimura/AP. Image may be subject to copyrights.

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Mt. Etna Erupts

Posted by feww on January 15, 2011

Europe’s largest and most active volcano lights up the Sicilian night with a fountain and cascade of lava


The massive Mt Etna erupts. Image credit: ANSA. Image may be subject to copyright.


Mt Etna, Europe’s largest and most active volcano,  rumbled spewing ash and steam into the air on January 11 when
MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite captured the above image of the east coast of Sicily featuring the 3,350-meter-high volcano’s unrest, a day before it erupted. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge. Download larger image (3 MB, JPEG)


A plume of sulfur dioxide from Mt Etna is being carried over the Mediterranean Sea. Image was acquired by the AIRS on NASA’s EOS-AQUA satellite. Click image to enlarge.

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33 volcanic tremors rock Mt. Bulusan

Posted by feww on November 22, 2010

Bulusan ejects a 2-km column of ash and steam into the air

At least 500 families have been evacuated from areas near the volcano. About 3,000 families (15,000 people) in 18 villages have so far been affected by the ash eruptions.

Mt. Bulusan remains under Alert Level 1 that prohibits the public from entering  the 4-km radius of the Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ).

Meanwhile the  municipal council in the town of Sorsogon has declared “a state of calamity” following  repeated ash eruptions from Bulusan Volcano and threats of lahars and  pyroclastic flows into the local rivers.

The ash explosions from  Bulusan Volcano has already “affected Barangays (villages) Cogon, Monbon, Tinampo, Bolos, Gulang-Gulang, Bagsangan, Mapaso and Gabao and the rivers of Patag and Cadac-an in this town,” according to a report.


Mount Bulusan ash explosions shower Sorsogon town in Bicol region south of Manila, Philippines on 21 November 2010. Photo credit:  EPA/ALDRIN RECEBIDO. Image may be subject to copyright.

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Arabia Lucky Last Time

Posted by feww on September 27, 2010

Will Arabia Be So Lucky Next Time?

A swarm of at least 30,000 tremors  that struck Harrat Lunayyir, an ancient  lava field in western Arabia, between April and June 2009 was a ‘failed eruption,’ US and Arabian geologists say.


An aerial view of one of the volcanoes in the Al-Aayiss area.

Based on the ground deformation satellite data, depth and signature of the shockwaves, the researchers have concluded that the seismic activity was related to a ‘failed volcanic eruption.’ They say magma has now moved very  close to the surface, increasing the probability of an eruption.

The Arabian peninsula’s western side comprises lava fields [harrat] measuring up to 200,000 square kilometers, which were formed over the past 30 million years, after Arabia split from Africa.


Fissures formed when the earthquake swarm struck Harrat Lunayyir, western Arabia, between April and June 2009. Image source: Arabian media.  Image may be subject to copyright.

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Sinabung Erupts Again

Posted by feww on August 30, 2010

Mount Sinabung 2nd eruption ‘more powerful’

Sinabung spewed ash to a height of about 2km in its second eruption in two days


Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in Suka Nalu village in the district of Tanah Karo, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province August 30, 2010. The Indonesian volcano that erupted for the first time in centuries on Sunday spewed fresh plumes of smoke early on Monday morning, causing panic in nearby villages and delaying local flights, officials said on Monday.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.  More photos …

According to Indonesia’s head volcanologist, Surono, Today’s eruption was more powerful than the first yesterday.

“Earlier today was another eruption at 6.30 a.m., sending out smoke as high as two km, more or less.” He said.

“I saw some hot pieces of volcanic rock come out and burn trees in the area,” A Reuters photographer said

“People have been evacuated from areas within a six km (four-mile) radius of the volcano,” vulcanologist Surono said. “Beyond six km it is safe, but there has still been a lot of panic among people here who don’t understand that.”

He said it was impossible to know when the eruptions would stop, but it was unlikely volcanic dust would drift to neighboring countries.

“Here, [the volcanic dash]  is three millimeters (1/8 of an inch) thick on the leaves of plants,” he said, adding that he did not believe the neighboring countries would be affected as a result of this eruptive episode.

Our colleagues at EDRO believe that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Earlier Entries:

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Mount Sinabung Erupts

Posted by feww on August 29, 2010

Lava spewing ‘like a ball of fire’

Indonesian officials have issued a red alert after Mount Sinabung on the island of Sumatra began spewing lava early Sunday morning.


Villagers ride a motorcycle while covering their mouths at the district of Tanah Karo outside the city of Medan, North Sumatra, as the Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in the background August 28, 2010.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.

The volcano had been spewing smoke and ash to a height of about 1.5km a.s.l. throughout Saturday, local reports said, quoting  eye witnesses who saw lava spewing out of the volcano from 7 km away.

The authorities have evacuated up to 15,000 residents living near the volcano.

Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes, and had last erupted about 400 years ago.

The head of Indonesia’s vulcanology center was quoted by Reuters as saying:

“This is the first time since 1600 that Sinabung erupted [although there are no activities recorded] and we have little knowledge in terms on its eruptive patterns and general forms.”


The conical Sinabung volcano, seen here from the east, rises above farmlands on the Kato Plateau. Gunung Sinabung contains four summit craters, the southernmost of which is the youngest. Many prominent lava flows appear on the flanks of the volcano. No confirmed historical eruptions are known from Gunung Sinabung. Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1987 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.


Sinabung volcano, seen from Gurukinayan village on the south, shows prominent lava flows on its flanks and a dramatic summit spine. The summit of Gunung Sinabung is much less frequently visited than neighboring Sabayak volcano to the NE. Photo by S. Wikartadipura, 1982 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Source: GVP.


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.

The volcano is located about 260km east of the epicenter of the 9.1 – 9.3Mw earthquake which struck off the coast of Sumatra on December 26, 2004, triggering the deadly Boxing Day Tsunami.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [16 July 2010]

Posted by feww on July 16, 2010

Manam Volcano Puffs Out a Small Plume


Manam Volcano released a small plume on June 16, 2010, which was captured by ALI on NASA’s EO-1 satellite.  Source: NASA E/O.

The 1,807-m Manam, one of Papua New Guinea most active volcanoes, last erupted in 2009, is a  basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano forming a 10-km wide island, located about 13km off the coast of mainland PNG.

“Frequent historical eruptions, typically of mild-to-moderate scale, have been recorded at Manam since 1616. Occasional larger eruptions have produced pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached flat-lying coastal areas and entered the sea, sometimes impacting populated areas.” —GVP.

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (7 July – 13 July 2010)

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.

Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

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Other Volcano Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [9 July 2010]

Posted by feww on July 9, 2010

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (30 June – 6 July 2010)

  • Ebeko, Paramushir Island  [Group J]
  • Gorely, Southern Kamchatka (Russia) –  [Group J]
  • Tiatia, Kunashir Island [Group J]
  • Ulawun, New Britain [Group K]

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.


Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

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FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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