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Mass die-offs from human impact and planetary response to the assault could occur by early 2016

Posts Tagged ‘drought and deluge’

2013 Disasters in China Cost about $70B

Posted by feww on February 24, 2014

EXTREME WEATHER & CLIMATIC EVENTS
HUMAN-ENHANCED NATURAL DISASTERS

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Natural disasters cost China about $70 billion in 2013

Droughts and deluge, earthquakes and typhoons cost China about $70 billion in 2013, nearly twice the total in 2012.

The National Statistics Bureau reported flooding and mudslides cost China about $32billion in 2013, an increase of nearly 11 percent on  previous year, said Reuters.

Damage from droughts nearly quadrupled to about $15billion, while storm surges, snowfall and freezes cost an additional $7 billion.

Seismic disasters, primarily the deadly Sichuan Earthquake, added more than $16 billion to the total.

[For a comprehensive listing of disasters in China search blog content.]

China is the world’s biggest energy-related CO2 emitter (23.6% in 2009), and 2nd biggest cumulative energy-related CO2 emitter during the 158-year period between 1850 and 2008, accounting for about 9.37 % of the total.

Top Ten cumulative energy-related CO2 emitters (1850 – 2008)
1. The United States (28.56 %)
2. China (9.37%)
3. Russia (7.98%)
4. Germany (6.77%)
5. United Kingdom (5.78%)
6. Japan (3.94%)
7. France (2.75%)
8. India (2.53%)
9. Canada (2.18%)
10. Ukraine (2.14%)

Seawater intrusion affecting 2 million people in Shanghai

Meanwhile, CNTV reported:

Seawater is causing problems for two million people in Shanghai. The city is enduring its longest-lasting salt tide in more than 20 years. As of this morning, the salt tide intrusion has already lasted for 21 days, the longest since 1993. Shanghai is located at the mouth of the Yangtze River.

The intrusion occurs periodically, especially in winter and spring when the Yangtze water level is relatively low. High salt levels in water is harmful to people’s health, machinery, and crops. Shanghai’s water authorities say the reservoir built in 1993 can only hold a ten-day water supply. They’ve established a comprehensive plan to coordinate the city’s waterworks and appealed to the national government for support.

Chen Guoguang, senior engineer of Water Supply Distribution & Monitoring Center, said, “Together with the previous two salt tides, the intrusion this time is causing huge harm to our water safety. The whole process isn’t expected to end until early next month.”

Posted in Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Global Disasters 2014, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Brazil Drought Continues Intensifying

Posted by feww on February 23, 2014

EXTREME CLIMATIC EVENT
SEVERE DROUGHT

WATER RATIONING
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Water rationing enters third week as cities across 11 Brazilian states impose penalties on waste

Water rationing, which began more than two week ago in cities across 11 Brazilian states, has now entered a new phase with authorities imposing penalties for water waste.

The water rationing has affected about 10 million people throughout the country.

Meanwhile, temperatures continue to set new records in many regions, including the northeast, where up to a million cattle have perished due to heat exhaustion.

Brazil is world’s 7th largest economy and leading exporter of beef, coffee, orange juice, soybeans and sugar.

Brazil prcp anomalies 30 days
Brazil 30-day precipitation anomaly (mm) for 23 Jan. – 21 Feb. 2014. Source: cpc.ncep.noaa

Related Links

Posted in 2014 disaster diary, 2014 global disasters, Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, Global Disasters 2014, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Crop Disaster Declared for 386 Counties across 15 States

Posted by feww on December 13, 2013

Drought, excessive rainfall, cold temperatures cause crop disasters in 15 states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 386 counties across 15 states as agricultural disaster areas in 11 separate disaster declarations.

The disasters occurred across 15 states as a result of one or more of the following

    • Drought
    • Excessive rainfall
    • Excessive precipitation
    • Cooler than normal temperatures

The latest crop disaster designations are for the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Wyoming.

All counties and parishes listed as crop disaster areas on December 11, 2013,

Crop Disaster 2013

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 4,347 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 45 states, so far this year.

State and County level records of calendar year 2013 disaster designations made by the USDA include losses and damages caused by one or more of the following

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation
  • Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat
  • High Temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and December 11, 2013.

Recent Federal and Agriculture Disaster Declarations

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Severe Drought Plagues Central China

Posted by feww on November 22, 2013

Central China is now in a state of  almost permanent drought

severe drought in china nov 2013
No end in sight for the severe drought that has plagued central China. Image credit: gmw.com via Xinhua. More images…

China’s largest freshwater lake rapidly shrinking

Meantime, surface area of Poyang Lake, in China’s Jiangxi Province,  has shrunk to less than 6 percent of its original size of more than 3,500km²

An early dry season this year, which began in mid-October, has reduced the lake into shallow streams, said a report.

poyang lake
China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake, is drying up, causing a severe shortage of drinking water in the region, crippling the local fishing industry and threatening the lake’s ecology. Image credit: News.com via Xinhua. More images…

The lake has been subject to prolonged dry seasons since the 1990s due to persistent droughts, and reduced water supplies from the Yangtze River due to hydroelectric dams.

Other contributing factors include increasing water use and damage to the lake bed.

The crisis has caused a severe shortage of drinking water, crippling the local fishing industry and threatening the lake’s ecology,  said the report.

“Meteorological data showed the province has received 60 percent less precipitation since September than the average over the same period since records began in 1952.”

Additionally, a cluster of 29 dams erected on the upper reaches of the Yangtze river, which includes the Three Gorges Dam, store a total of up to 53 billion cubic meters of water, contributing to the death of Poyang, according to China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research.

Large numbers of migrating Siberian cranes used to spend the winter on Poyang Lake.

Posted in Climate Change, environment, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Crop Disaster Areas Declared across 4 States

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

22 Counties across four states declared crop disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 22  counties in four states as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by excessive rains and flooding that began May 5, 2013, and continues.

The disaster areas are

Vermont: Addison, Chittenden, Grand Isle, Rutland, Bennington, Essex, Orange, Caledonia, Franklin, Orleans, Windham, Washington, Windsor and Lamoille counties.

Massachusetts: Berkshire and Franklin counties.

New Hampshire: Cheshire, Coos, Grafton and  Sullivan counties.

New York:  Rensselaer and Washington counties.

Crop Disaster 2013

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,924 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 44 states, so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation
  • Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat
  • High Temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and November 20, 2013.

Recent Crop Disaster Designations

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Saudi Capital Plagued by “Biblical” Floods

Posted by feww on November 17, 2013

Saudis Swamped by Severe Flooding

Catastrophic flooding has hit Saudi Arabia, especially Riyadh, the country’s capital, inundating homes, streets and businesses, forcing the government to close schools and urge people to stay indoors, as torrential rains continue.

saudi flooding
Image credit: Jeee@Jana_oOo.

Forecasters have predicted torrential rains will continue to pummel Saudi Arabia through Monday, and the Saudi Civil Defense has warned people to stay indoors for their own safety, according to local media.

Floods in the port city of Jeddah on the Red Sea has killed about 150  people since 2009.


Jeddah Under Water November 2009. Source: SahilOnlie. Image may be subject to copyright. As Muslim pilgrims were casting stones at three concrete walls representing the devil on the third day of the annual hajj, torrential rains inundated  the port city of Jeddah, where 80 mm of rain fell in just a few hours, killing up to 130 people, forcing the closure of the main highway to Mecca, and stranding thousands of pilgrims on their way to the Muslims’ holy city. [The pilgrims efforts might have been more meaningful had they cast their stones at a mock-up of an oil rig, a giant oil drum or effigy of an supertanker.]

Related Links

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Crop Disaster Losses 2013

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

Disaster Declarations USDA: 3,721 County-level crop disasters in 38 states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,721 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 38 states so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation, Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat, High temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and September 25, 2013.

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Disaster Declared for 204 Counties in 10 States

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, disaster calendar, disaster diary, disaster watch, disaster watch 2013, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, global drought | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S. Drought Eases

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

Drought conditions improve slightly; near- to above-normal temps to persist nationwide

In the short term, temperatures are expected to rise  10 to 15 degrees above average from the Upper Great Lakes to part of the Middle Mississippi Valley; in contrast, temperatures will be 10 to 20 degrees below average from the Northern/Central High Plains to the Great Basin/Central Rockies, said NWS.

As of September 25, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states remained agricultural disaster areas due to the drought, said USDA.

us drought map 24sep13
US Drought Map as of September 24, released by US Drought Monitor on September 26, 2013.

The Midwest: “By September 22, topsoil moisture was still rated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at least half very short to short in Iowa (77%), Missouri (69%), Illinois (66%), South Dakota (62%), Nebraska (61%), and Wisconsin (55%).  On the same date, USDA rated at least half of the pastures in very poor to poor condition in Iowa (62%) and Wisconsin (58%).  And, more than one-quarter of the corn and soybeans were rated very poor to poor in Wisconsin (29 and 29%, respectively), Missouri (27 and 33%), and Iowa (27 and 29%).” U.S. Drought Monitor reported.

The Great Plains: “Despite all of the rain, rangeland and pastures across some parts of the Great Plains continued to suffer from the cumulative effects of multiple drought years.  On September 22, rangeland and pastures were rated at least one-third very poor to poor several states, including Texas (54%), Colorado (43%), Nebraska (40%), and Kansas (36%).”

The Lower Mississippi Valley:  “… topsoil moisture was still rated 41% very short to short in Arkansas and Louisiana, although those numbers represented a significant improvement from the previous week’s figures of 78 and 52%, respectively.”

The West: “No changes in the drought depiction were yet introduced in the Northwest, but the region will be monitored as precipitation continues to spread inland.”

Hawaii and Alaska: “From September 1-24, Hilo’s rainfall totaled just 2.17 inches (28% of normal).  Near the southern tip of the Big Island, very poor pasture conditions led to degradation from severe to extreme drought (D2 to D3). [...] Fairbanks reported its first autumn freeze (29°F) on September 15, followed 3 days later by its first measurable snowfall (0.6 inch).  Meanwhile, heavy precipitation fell in non-drought areas of southeastern Alaska, where Ketchikan netted 12.22 inches of rain from September 15-23.”

Related Links

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Major Disaster Declaration for North Carolina

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

North Carolina Declared Federal Disaster Area

The Disaster President has declared a major disaster exists in the State of North Carolina in the areas affected by severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides during the period of July 3-13, 2013.

Worst of the damage caused the severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides have occurred in the counties of Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Jackson, Macon, Madison, Mitchell, Polk, Watauga, and Yancey and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments, said Fema.

Western North Carolina to Receive Federal Aid for Flood Repairs

“This summer’s flooding was a sobering reminder that all regions of our state are vulnerable to flooding even without hurricanes,” said NC Governor McCrory. “These communities did a great job responding to the devastating floods and landslides. Now we can help them recover financially.”

Catawba, Lincoln and Wilkes counties were included in the state’s aid request but were not included in the federal disaster declaration. The state is appealing to FEMA to reconsider the counties that were omitted.

A series of severe thunderstorms and heavy rains dumped between 10 and 20 inches of rain over much of the foothills and mountains from July 3 through 27.

Several locations reported more than 20 inches of rainfall and many counties reported the wettest July on record. The record-breaking rainfall damaged roads, bridges, culverts, public utilities, parks and even some schools in many western counties.

See more at http://www.governor.state.nc.us/

Posted in Climate Change, disaster calendar, disaster diary, disaster watch, disaster watch 2013, disaster zone, environment, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Agricultural Disaster Declared for 204 Counties

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S. Drought Map – September 17, 2013

Posted by feww on September 20, 2013

US Drought Conditions

About 64.09 percent of the land in the contiguous Unites States were covered by drought conditions D0 (Abnormally Dry) to D4 (Exceptional Drought) week ending September 17, 2013, up from 63.75 percent the previous week, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Drought conditions D1 – D4 improved marginally to 48.19 percent, down from 50.69 percent earlier.

us drought map 17sep13

Weather Summary [mirrored from U.S. Drought Monitor]:

The combination of ample Gulf and Pacific tropical moisture (in part from Tropical Storms Manuel (Pacific) and Ingrid (Gulf) which inundated Mexico), stalled frontal systems, and upsloping conditions produced widespread heavy to copious rainfall (widespread 2 to 6 inches, locally 12 to 18 inches especially near Boulder, CO) and severe flash flooding in parts of New Mexico and Colorado.

Moderate to heavy rains (1.5 to 4 inches) also drenched portions of Arizona, eastern Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, south-central Montana, western sections of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and northern and southern Texas. September monsoonal rains have generated welcome relief from the drought in the Southwest, central Rockies, and High Plains, but unfortunately have been accompanied by flash flooding.

US Drought Disaster Areas

As of September 18, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states have been designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.

us drought disaster map 18-09-2013
US Drought Disaster Map. At least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states have been designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought since January 1, 2013. Image source: USDA

Related Links

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Agricultural Disaster Declared for 194 Counties in 13 States

Posted by feww on September 20, 2013

Drought and Deluge Prompt Disaster Declarations in Multiple Regions across U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 194 counties in 13 states across 5 regions as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused either by drought, or by one or more of hail, severe freezing, excessive snow, excessive rain and flooding.

  • As of September 18, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.
  • Since September 11, 2013 a total of 332 counties have been designated as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

[Notes: 1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas. 2. The USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is a 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop. 3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

Drought Disaster

USDA has designated a total of eight counties in Idaho and Montana as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

  • Idaho: Clearwater, Lewis, Idaho, Latah, Nez Perce and Shoshone counties.
  • Montana: Mineral and Missoula counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning January 1, 2013

USDA has designated 102 counties in five states—Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began January 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Alabama (64 Counties):  Autauga, Cleburne, Geneva, Macon, Baldwin, Coosa, Greene, Madison, Barbour, Covington, Hale, Marengo, Blount, Crenshaw, Henry, Mobile, Bullock, Cullman, Houston, Monroe, Calhoun, Dale, Jackson, Montgomery, Cherokee, Dallas, Jefferson, Morgan, Chilton, Elmore, Lamar, Perry, Choctaw, Etowah, Lauderdale, Pickens, Clarke, Fayette, Lowndes, Pike, Russell, St. Clair, Shelby, Sumter, Talladega, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, Washington, Wilcox, Bibb, Coffee, Escambia, Marion, Butler, Colbert, Lawrence, Marshall, Chambers, Conecuh, Lee, Randolph, Clay, De Kalb, Limestone and Winston counties.
  • Florida (5 Counties):  Escambia, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa and Walton.
  • Georgia (13 Counties): Carroll, Clay, Floyd, Polk, Chattahoochee, Dade, Haralson, Quitman, Chattooga, Early , Muscogee, Seminole and Stewart.
  • Mississippi (11 Counties): Clarke, Jackson, Lowndes, Tishomingo, George, Kemper, Monroe, Wayne, Greene, Lauderdale and Noxubee.
  • Tennessee (7 Counties): Franklin, Hardin, Lincoln, Wayne, Giles, Lawrence and Marion counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning May 1, 2013

USDA has designated 54 counties in three states—The Carolinas and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began May 1, 2013, and continues.

  • North Carolina (41 Counties): Avery, Cleveland, Henderson, Rutherford, Brunswick, Columbus, Madison, Transylvania, Buncombe, Durham, Orange, Watauga, Wilson, Alamance, Chatham, Jackson, New Hanover, Ashe, Edgecombe, Johnston, Pender, Bladen, Gaston, Lincoln, Burke, Granville, McDowell, Pitt, Caldwell, Greene, Mitchell, Polk, Caswell, Haywood, Nash, Person, Robeson, Wake, Wayne, Wilkes and Yancey counties.
  • South Carolina (8 Counties): Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Spartanburg, Dillon, Horry, Pickens and York counties.
  • Tennessee (5 Counties): Carter, Cocke, Greene, Johnson and Unicoi.

Disasters caused by combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013

USDA has designated 22 counties in Minnesota and Iowa as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to the combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013.

  • Minnesota (18 Counties): Dodge, Koochiching, Mower, Steele, Freeborn, Lake of the Woods, Olmsted, Beltrami, Goodhue, Roseau, Waseca, Faribault, Itasca, St. Louis, Winona, Fillmore, Rice and Wabasha counties.
  • Iowa (4 Counties): Howard, Mitchell, Winnebago and Worth.

Hail Disaster on August 6, 2013

USDA has designated 8 counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by hail that occurred August 6, 2013.

  • Minnesota: Dakota, Goodhue, Ramsey, Scott, Hennepi, Rice and Washington counties.
  • Wisconsin: Pierce County.

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Tens of Thousands Evacuated as Colorado Floods Worsen

Posted by feww on September 13, 2013

“biblical rainfall amounts” trigger historic  flooding along Colorado’s Front Range mountain

Flash Flood Warnings remained in effect for much of eastern and northern Colorado including the entire Denver/Boulder metropolitan area, with a population of more than 3 million.

The National Weather Service issued an urgent bulletin at 9:41am on Thursday that expressed the scale of the threat: “Major flooding/flash flooding event underway at this time with biblical rainfall amounts reported in many areas in/near the foothills.”

Boulder was pounded with more than 7 inches of rain in 24 hours, which shattered the town’s 95-year rainfall record.

“This is not an ordinary day. It is not an ordinary disaster,” said Boulder County Sheriff.

  • Cascading floodwaters from Boulder Canyon above the city forced the evacuation of more than 8,000 Boulder residences.
  • The enclave of Jamestown north of Boulder was completely evacuated.
  • Entire town of Eldorado Springs in south Boulder County were ordered to evacuate due to the threats of rising waters and mudslide.

coal creek canyon - credit Jefferson County Sheriff
Coal Creek Canyon. Photo credit: Jefferson County Sheriff. More images…

Near the town of Lyons, St. Vrain River jumped its banks, and a dam failed near Pinewood Springs, isolating the town, said a report.

In Longmont (population: ~ 88,000) about 14 miles northeast of Boulder, St. Vrain Creek again overflowed its banks, inundating the main roads and dividing the city.

  • At least  7,000 residences in Longmont were under mandatory evacuation orders.

The University of Colorado campus in Boulder was one of  the hardest hit areas. More than 500 hundred students and staff members were ordered evacuated, as devastating floodwaters damaged a quarter of the campus buildings, officials said.

Colorado Governor Hickenlooper declared a disaster for the flooded areas.

“We have declared a disaster for the flooded areas and are requesting emergency declaration from FEMA for search and rescue and emergency protection and other support,” said Hickenlooper. “We want to get something in front of President Obama as rapidly as possible.”

“The State Emergency Center has been activated to a Level 3 category of alert or action 24/7. So they will be providing direct resources across the state to the counties affected by the flooding.”

The White House signed a federal emergency declaration Thursday night.

Mudslides and rockslides have blocked parts of U.S. 6, Boulder Canyon, Colorado 14 and U.S. 287, said the Denver Post. Lefthand Canyon was reportedly blocked by multiple slides.

The disaster has claimed at least three lives, but authorities expect the toll to rise.

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U.S. Drought Expands by 2 Percent

Posted by feww on September 12, 2013

Lake Altus-Lugert drops to a historic low level of 12.6 percent of capacity: US Drought Monitor 

As of September 10, 2013  about 63.75 percent of land area in the contiguous U.S. was covered by D0-D4 drought conditions, up from 61.71 percent last week, while more than half of the country was in moderate drought condition or worse, with about a third experiencing severe, exceptional or extreme drought levels, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

us drought map 10sep13
US Drought Map as of September 10, released by US Drought Monitor on  September 12, 2013.

2013 Drought Disaster Areas

As of September 11, 2013 at least 1,338 counties and parishes, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.

[Note: The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.]

Drought Summary — Selected Regions — September 10, 2013

[Source: Mirrored from U.S. Drought Monitor with some editing]

  • The Northeast: Continuing dry conditions prompted the introduction of abnormal dryness (D0) across central Maryland, southwestern Connecticut, and Long Island, N.Y., this week. According to AHPS, these areas have significant precipitation deficits at 180-, 90-, 60-, 30-, and 14 days. Streams and rivers are also running low, especially in central Maryland.
  • The Midwest: Most of the Midwest remained dry this past week… Positive temperature departures of 4-8 degrees F were common throughout the region, with +10 degree F anomalies over portions of Iowa and southern Minnesota … widespread 1-category downgrades were made to the drought depiction across northern and southwestern Missouri, southern, central and eastern Iowa, parts of northern Illinois, northeastern and central Indiana, and central and southern portions of both Minnesota and Wisconsin.
  • The Lower Mississippi Valley: Lack of rain during the past 7-days, temperatures 2-6 degrees above normal, and stream flow values in the lowest quartile of their historical distributions prompted 1-category degradations to the depiction across northern and western Louisiana, central and southern Arkansas, and northern and central Mississippi.
  • Central and Northern Great Plains: One-category downgrades were warranted across southeastern Nebraska … In Kansas, the area of abnormal dryness (D0) in the northeast was expanded, and D0 conditions were added to southeast parts of the state.
  • Southern Great Plains: Continuing dryness over north-central and northeastern Texas warranted a number of 1-category degradations. Texas, as dry weather has followed a reasonably wet summer in the region. In Oklahoma, 1-category downgrades were made across a significant portion of the state, with remaining drought-free areas in central and eastern Oklahoma deteriorating to abnormal dryness (D0). In Jackson County (southwest part of state)… Lake Altus-Lugert dropped to a historic low level of 12.6 percent of capacity.
  • The Northwest: … the short-term gains have not offset long-term precipitation deficits… no change… in this area.
  • Hawaii: A 1-categorydowngrade was warranted for western and southeastern sides of the Big Island of Hawaii…
    • On the west side, it was reported that livestock and ornamental producers were having to haul water to sustain operations, which is very expensive and significantly reduces profits.
    • On the southeast side of the Island, there were reports of crop stress.
  • Alaska: No changes were made in Alaska this week.

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Agricultural Disaster Declared for 78 Counties

Posted by feww on September 12, 2013

Drought, Tornado, Frosts and Freezes Cause Agricultural Disasters in 78 Counties across 7 States

Drought

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 16 counties in Texas and two parishes in Louisiana as agricultural  disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by the ongoing drought.

  • Texas: The disaster areas are Panola, Polk, Trinity, Walker, Angelina, Harrison, Madison, San Jacinto, Grimes, Houston, Montgomery, Shelby, Hardin, Liberty, Rusk and Tyler counties.
  • Louisiana: Caddo and De Soto parishes.

At least 1,338 counties and parishes, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, have been designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought so far in 2013.

[Note: The lists include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.]

U-S Drought Disaster Map – September 11, 2013

U-S Drought disaster map 11sep13
As of September 11, 2013, at least 1,338 counties and parishes, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought so far in 2013.

Frosts and Freezes, April 1 – June 19, 2013

USDA has designated 44 counties in Michigan and one in Ohio as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by frosts and freezes that occurred April 1 – June 19, 2013.

  • Michigan: The disaster areas are Antrim, Huron, Livingston, Manistee, Chippewa, Ionia, Luce, Monroe, Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Mackinac, Van Buren, Alger, Crawford, Kent, St. Joseph, Allegan, Eaton, Lake, Sanilac, Barry, Genessee, Lenawee, Schoolcraft, Benzie, Gratiot, Mason, Shiawassee, Berrien, Ingham, Missaukee, Tuscola, Cass, Jackson, Montcalm, Washtenaw, Charlevoix, Kalamazoo, Oakland, Wayne, Clinton, Kalkaska, Otego and Wexford counties.
  • Ohio: Lucas County.

Tornado

USDA has designated five counties in South Carolina as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by a tornado that occurred on June 4, 2013.

  • South Carolina: The disaster areas are Dorchester, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton and Orangeburg counties.

Frosts and Freezes, April 9 – May 3, 2013

USDA has designated eight counties in Colorado and two in Utah as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by frosts and freezes that occurred April 9 – May 3, 2013

  • Colorado: The disaster areas are Delta, Mesa , Montrose, Garfield, Gunnison, Ouray, Pitkin and San Miguel counties.
  • Utah: Grand and San Juan counties.

[Note: The the trigger point for a disaster declaration is a 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop, USDA said.]

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Global Disasters/ Significant Events – Sept. 6, 2013

Posted by feww on September 6, 2013

Drought 2013: Agricultural Disaster Declared in 1,336 Counties Across the U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated a total of 1,336 counties across 29 states as agricultural disaster areas, so far this year.

The designations include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

US agri disaster map - 04sep2013
Map of the U.S. Drought Disaster areas as of September 4, 2013. At least 1,336 counties, or 42.5% of all U.S. counties¹, were designated as agricultural disaster areas² due to the ongoing drought. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

1. [U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]
2. Agriculture officials declare disaster when crop damage has exceeded 30 percent.

Related Links

-oOo-

The Disaster President Signs Arkansas Disaster Declaration

The Disaster President has declared a major disaster exists in the State of Arkansas due to severe storms and flooding during the period of August 8-14, 2013.

Most of the losses and damage caused by the severe storms and flooding occurred in the counties of Benton, Boone, Carroll, Madison, Marion and Newton.

Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments, FEMA has said.

-oOo-

S. Korea bans seafood from eastern Japan

The South Korean government has banned imports of seafood products from 8 prefectures in eastern Japan due to the threat of radioactive contamination from toxic water leaks at Fukushima nuclear plant.

The ban, announced on Friday, will take effect on Monday, September 9, 2013, and will apply to ALL seafood imports from fisheries in 8 prefectures: Fukushima, Miyagi, Iwate, Aomori, Chiba, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma.

“The measures are due to the sharply increased concern in the public about the flow of hundreds of metric tons of contaminated water into the ocean at the site of the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan,” a spokesman for the South Korean Prime Minister’s office said.

“The officials also say the country will ask for test certificates if even a trace of radioactivity is found in fish, dairy products and other foods from anywhere in Japan,” said a report.

China banned imports of seafood products, dairy and vegetable from at least 5 Japanese prefectures, including Fukushima, immediately after the triple meltdown at Fukushima nuclear plant on March 11, 2011.

-oOo-

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Corn Belt Drought Intensifies

Posted by feww on September 6, 2013

Late growing season drought intensifies in Iowa, neighboring states: Report

Severe drought in Iowa increased to 32.07 percent up from 22.4 percent a week earlier, with 63.24 percent of the state covered in moderate drought or worse.

us drought map 3sept2013

“After such an ideal start to the growing season, the past two months have been much drier than usual, with temperatures slowly increasing,” said David Miskus of U.S. Drought Monitor.

  • Precipitation in central Iowa and northern Missouri was only 5 to 25 percent of normal, and as little as a tenth of an inch of rain.
  • Iowa recorded its warmest week since July 2012, with highs of 104 degrees Fahrenheit at Des Moines and Fort Madison on Aug. 30.
  • Iowa experienced its seventh driest August in 141 years of records, following the ninth driest July.
  • Crop and pasture conditions began to deteriorate rapidly once heat was added to the dryness.

Small areas of severe drought also showed up in Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin this week.

  • Drought also expanded or intensified in Mississippi, Oklahoma and on the Hawaiian island of Maui, during the week.

The portion of the drought-stricken areas in the U.S. corn belt increased from 45 to 52 percent during the week ending September 3, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s meteorologist Brad Rippey, the report said.

  • Soybeans in drought also increased in the last week, from 38 to 42 percent.
  • Corn and soybeans in drought bottomed out in July at 17 and 8 percent, respectively.
  • Cattle in drought increased one percent to 53 percent.

“Given that U.S. producers planted an estimated 97.4 million acres of corn and 77.2 million acres of soybeans in 2013, current drought figures suggest that more than 50 million acres (nearly 80,000 square miles) of corn and some 32 million acres (more than 50,000 square miles) of soybeans are presently being affected by drought,” Rippey said.

“According to USDA, nearly one-sixth of the U.S. corn (16 percent) and soybeans (15 percent) were rated in very poor to poor condition on September 1. A year ago, near the height of the Drought of 2012, very poor to poor ratings stood at 52 percent of the corn and 37 percent of the soybeans.”

As Midwest continued to dry out, parts of the Southwest and West saw scattered improvements from the monsoon season.

Overall, the portion of the contiguous United States in moderate to exceptional drought crept up to 50.09 percent from 50.04 percent a week earlier.

  • The total land area in moderate drought increased to 17.69 percent, up from 16.67 previously.
  • The area in exceptional drought shrank to 1.25 percent, down 0.07 percent from last week.

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U.S. Drought Expands Mainly in the South, High Plains

Posted by feww on August 29, 2013

62.34 pct of contiguous US experiencing drought or abnormally dry conditions

Drought and abnormally dry conditions covered about 62.34 percent of contiguous United States, up from 59.98 percent a week earlier.

The percentage of land areas in the lower 48 covered by “Extreme” and “Exceptional Drought” levels remained nearly unchanged, while the total areas covered by “Severe” and “Moderate Drought” levels  increased by about 4.43 percent.

usdrmon 27aug13

Meantime, USDA designated 39 additional counties in 5 states as agricultural disaster areas due to damage and losses caused by the recent drought.

  • Texas: Cherokee, Rusk, Smith, Van Zandt, Wood, Anderson, Gregg, Houston, Panola, Angelina, Harrison, Hunt, Rains, Camp, Henderson, Kaufman, Shelby, Franklin, Hopkins, Nacogdoches and Upshur counties.
  • Colorado: Eagle, Garfield, Lake, Routt, Grand, Pitkin and Summit counties.
  • Oregon: Curry, Coos, Douglas and Josephine counties.
  • California: Del Norte County.
  • Idaho: Jerome, Cassia, Gooding, Lincoln, Minidoka and Twin Falls counties.

All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Aug. 28, 2013. The lists include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

US agri disaster map - 28aug2013
Map of the U.S. Drought Disaster areas as of August 28, 2013. At least 1,336 counties, or 42.5% of all U.S. counties¹, were designated as agricultural disaster areas² due to the ongoing drought. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

1. [U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]
2. Agriculture officials declare disaster when crop damage has exceeded 30 percent.

UPDATED: September 6, 2013 – MAP CORRECTED!

Related Links

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Agricultural Disasters Declared for 180 U.S. Counties

Posted by feww on August 29, 2013

Extreme weather events, severe climatic episodes cause agricultural disasters across 14 states

Drought and Deluge, hail and high winds, severe storms and excessive rains have prompted USDA to designate 180 counties across 14 states as agricultural disaster areas.

Drought

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 39 counties in 5 states as agricultural disaster areas due to damage and losses caused by the recent drought.

  • Texas: Cherokee, Rusk, Smith, Van Zandt, Wood, Anderson, Gregg, Houston, Panola, Angelina, Harrison, Hunt, Rains, Camp, Henderson, Kaufman, Shelby, Franklin, Hopkins, Nacogdoches and Upshur counties.
  • Colorado: Eagle, Garfield, Lake, Routt, Grand, Pitkin and Summit counties.
  • Oregon: Curry, Coos, Douglas and Josephine counties.
  • California: Del Norte County.
  • Idaho: Jerome, Cassia, Gooding, Lincoln, Minidoka and Twin Falls counties.

All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Aug. 28, 2013. The lists include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

US agri disaster map - 28aug2013
Map of the U.S. Drought Disaster areas as of August 28, 2013. At least 1,336 counties, or 42.5% of all U.S. counties¹, were designated as agricultural disaster areas² due to the ongoing drought. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

1. [U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]
2. Agriculture officials declare disaster when crop damage has exceeded 30 percent.

UPDATED: September 6, 2013 – MAP CORRECTED!

Hail, high winds and severe storm

USDA has designated seven counties in two states as agricultural disaster area due to damage and losses caused by hail, high winds and severe storms that occurred August 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Montana: Park, Carbon, Gallatin, Meagher, Stillwater and Sweet Grass counties.
  • Wyoming: Park County.

Excessive Rain and Flooding

USDA has designated 68 counties across six states as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that occurred March 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Tennessee: Bradley, Hamilton, Macon, Rhea, Greene, Knox, Smith, Unicoi, Cocke, Hardin, Marion, Sequatchie, Washington, Anderson, Clay, Hawkins, Decatur, Jefferson, Polk, Sevier, Monroe, Benton, Cumberland, Henderson, Putnam, Blount, Franklin, Loudon, Sumner, Chester, Hamblen, Meigs, Roane, Carroll, Grainger, McMinn, Trousdale, Union, Van Buren, Warren, Sullivan, Carter, Grundy, McNairy, Wayne, Wilson, Perry, Bledsoe, De Kalb and Jackson counties.
  • Alabama: Jackson and Lauderdale counties.
  • Georgia: Catoosa, Fannin, Walker, Dade, Murray and Whitfield counties.
  • Kentucky: Allen and Monroe counties.
  • Mississippi: Alcorn and Tishomingo counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee,  Madison,  Swain, Haywood, Mitchell and Yancey counties.

Agricultural Disaster Declared in ALL 46 South Carolina Counties due to Excessive Rain and Flooding

USDA has designated the entire state of South Carolina and 20 other counties across Georgia and North Carolina as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that occurred March 1, 2013, and continues.

  • South Carolina: ALL 46 counties. Aiken, Chesterfield, Greenville, Orangeburg, Berkeley, Dorchester, Lee, Sumter, Allendale, Clarendon, Hampton, Pickens, Calhoun, Edgefield, Marion, Union, Bamberg, Colleton, Horry, Richland, Charleston, Florence, Marlboro, Williamsburg, Barnwell, Darlington, Jasper, Saluda, Cherokee, Georgetown, Newberry, York, Beaufort, Dillon, Laurens, Spartanburg, Anderson, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, Abbeville, Chester, Greenwood, Lancaster, Oconee and McCormick counties.
  • Georgia: Burke, Columbia, Richmond, Chatham, Effingham and Screven counties.
  • North Carolina: Anson, Columbus, Mecklenburg, Robeson, Cleveland, Henderson, Richmond, Scotland, Brunswick, Gaston, Polk, Rutherford, Transylvania and Union counties.

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U.S. Drought Expands

Posted by feww on August 22, 2013

Abnormally Dry to Severe Drought levels expand; Extreme to Exceptional Drought levels retreat

 Abnormally Dry to Severe Drought levels spread in the contiguous United States, while areas covered by  Extreme to Exceptional Drought levels retreat.

us drought monitor
US Drought Map as of August 20, 2013, released by US Drought Monitor on  Thursday August 22, 2013.

Agricultural Disaster Designations due to the Drought

At least 1,333 counties across 28 states have now been designated agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought so far this year. [The figure includes both the primary and contiguous drought disaster areas. ]

us drought disaster map 8-21-2013
U.S. Drought Disaster Map as of August 21, 2013. At least 1,333 counties, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties*, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought, a rise of 0.41% (16 counties) since last week. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

*[U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

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1,333 U.S. Counties Now Designated Drought Disaster Areas

Posted by feww on August 22, 2013

16 Additional Counties Designated as Agricultural Disaster Areas

At least 1,333 counties across 28 states have now been designated agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought so far this year. [The figure includes both the primary and contiguous drought disaster areas. ] us drought disaster map 8-21-2013
U.S. Drought Disaster Map as of August 21, 2013. At least 1,333 counties, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties*, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought, a rise of 0.41% (16 counties) since last week. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

*[U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

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U.S. Drought Map – August 13, 2013

Posted by feww on August 16, 2013

U.S. drought down fractionally, but more counties designated drought disaster areas

  • As of August 13, 2013 about 57.30 percent of contiguous United States were affected by drought conditions, down slightly from 57.40 percent a week earlier.
  • Some  45.26 percent of the land areas were covered by Moderate Drought (D1) to Exceptional Drought (D4), down from 45.49 percent.

us drought map 13-8-13
US Drought Map as of August 13, 2013, released by US Drought Monitor on  August 15, 2013.

Map of U.S. Drought Disaster Areas

As of August 14, 2013 at least 1,317 U.S. counties were designated as primary or contiguous agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.

us drought disaster map 8-14-2013
U.S. Drought Disaster Map as of August 14, 2013.  At least 1,317 counties, or 42% of all counties*, were designated as drought disaster areas. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

*[U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

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U.S. Drought Expands Slightly

Posted by feww on August 9, 2013

Extreme Drought, Abnormally Dry Levels in Lower 48 Expand Marginally

Areas covered by various drought levels in contiguous United States expanded marginally in the week ending August 6, 2013. D0 – D4 Drought levels covered 57.40 percent of the lower 48, up from 57.23 percent previous period.

The region worst affected by the drought was the South, where Exceptional Drought expanded to 3.75 percent, up from 3.04 percent earlier. The region’s D0 – D4 drought levels also expanded to 74.44 percent, up from 73.81 percent a week earlier.

us drought map
US Drought Map as of August 6, 2013, released by US Drought Monitor on  August 8, 2013.

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Deadly Flooding in Missouri: State of Emergency Declared

Posted by feww on August 8, 2013

Missouri Gov. declares state of emergency due  to deadly flooding

Gov. Nixon has declared a state of emergency amid flash flooding in south-central Missouri which has left a 4-year-old boy dead and forced scores of people out of their homes.

“Parts of southern Missouri have been hit with heavy rain for several days, causing deadly flash-flooding, and that threat is not over,” Nixon said in a statement. “We have moved resources into the region to assist local authorities, but it is extremely important for the public in affected areas to pay close attention to weather conditions, have an evacuation plan and immediately move to higher ground if needed.”

Posted in evacuation order, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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