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Posts Tagged ‘excessive rain’

Crop Disasters Declared in Six States

Posted by feww on April 17, 2014

EXTREME WEATHER & CLIMATIC EVENTS
DROUGHT
EXCESSIVE RAIN
FREEZE & FROST

CROP DISASTERS
.

Drought, Excessive Rain, Freeze and Frost  Cause Crop Disasters across Dozens of Counties in 6 States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 52 Counties across six states—Arizona, California, Oklahoma, Alabama, Florida and Georgia—as crop disaster areas in four separate designations due to various disasters.

Drought Disaster in Arizona and California

USDA has designated five counties in Arizona and three counties in California as Crop Disaster Areas due to ongoing Drought. Those areas are

  • Arizona. La Paz, Maricopa, Mohave, Yavapai and Yuma counties.
  • California. Imperial, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

Drought Disaster in Oklahoma

USDA has designated seven counties in Oklahoma as Crop Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by the drought.  Those areas are Blaine, Dewey, Caddo, Canadian, Custer, Kingfisher and Major counties.

Crop Disasters from Excessive Rain in Florida

USDA has designated nine counties in Florida as Crop Disaster Areas due to excessive rain that occurred from Jan. 1- March 14, 2014.

Those counties are Alachua, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Flagler, Marion, Putnam, St. Johns  and Volusia.

Crop Disasters Caused by Freeze and Frost

USDA has designated 24 counties in Florida as crop disaster areas due to freeze and frost that occurred from Jan. 7-31, 2014 (and presumably continues. The wording is ambiguous).

Those counties are Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Broward, Clay, Columbia, Duval, Gilchrist, Glades, Hendry, Holmes, Levy, Marion, Nassau, Okaloosa, Palm Beach, Walton, Martin, Putnam, Okeechobee, Santa Rosa, Union and Washington.

Farmers and ranchers in the following counties in Alabama and Georgia also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous.

  • Alabama. Covington, Escambia and Geneva counties.
  • Georgia. Charlton County.

Drought Disasters 2014

Beginning January 10, 2014 USDA has declared at least 1,062 counties across 21 states as crop disaster areas. Most of those designations are due to drought.

  • Those states are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Utah.

Notes:
i. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

ii. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

iii. A number of counties may have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

iv. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

v. The disaster designations posted above were approved by USDA on April 2, 2014.

Related Links

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Multiple Crop Disasters Declared for Michigan

Posted by feww on January 25, 2014

EXTREME CLIMATIC EVENTS
MULTIPLE CROP DISASTERS
.

Crop Disasters Hit 89 Counties Across Three States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 86 counties in Michigan, two counties in Wisconsin and one in Ohio as agricultural disaster areas in three different designations due to multiple disasters.

Designation #1

USDA has designated 56 counties in Michigan as crop disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain with cooler than normal temperatures that began April 1, 2013, and continues.

Alcona, Chippewa, Gratiot, Mackinac, Arenac, Clare, Houghton, Midland, Baraga, Crawford, Huron, Monroe, Bay, Emmet, Iosco, Muskegon, Charlevoix, Gladwin, Luce, Newaygo, Cheboygan, Gogebic, Ogemaw, Ontonagon, Oscoda, Presque Isle, Roscommon, Alger, Isabella, Marquette, Oceana, Alpena, Kalkaska, Mason, Osceola, Antrim, Kent, Mecosta, Otsego, Clinton, Keweenaw, Missaukee, Ottawa, Ionia, Lake, Montcalm, Saginaw, Iron, Lenawee, Montmorency, Sanilac, Schoolcraft, Shiawassee, Tuscola, Washtenaw and  Wayne counties.

The designation includes also the following areas in neighboring states:

  • Ohio: Lucas County.
  • Wisconsin: Iron and Vilas counties.

Designation #2

USDA has also designated 5 counties in Michigan as crop disaster areas  due to damages and losses caused by drought with cooler than normal temperatures that occurred August 1 – September 28, 2013.

The disaster areas are:

Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Manistee, Wexford and Benzie counties.

Designation #3

USDA has further designated 25 counties in Michigan as crop disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by the combined effects of excessive rain that occurred April 1 – July 29, 2013, and returning October 15, 2013, and continuing. The designation also includes drought that occurred July 30 – October 15, 2013, and cooler than normal temperatures which spanned the entire disaster period. The counties are:

Alpena, Grand Traverse, Mecosta, Montmorency, Antrim, Kalkaska, Missaukee, Osceola, Otsego, Wexford, Alcona, Cheboygan, Isabella, Manistee, Benzie, Clare, Lake, Montcalm, Charlevoix, Crawford, Leelanau, Newaygo, Oscoda, Presque Isle and Roscommon.

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. Total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA on January 22 and released on January 24, 2013.

2014 Agriculture Disaster Declarations

Related Links

Posted in 2014 disaster calendar, 2014 disaster diary, 2014 global disasters, Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Crop Disasters Declared in 6 States

Posted by feww on January 10, 2014

46 Counties across six states designated as crop disaster areas by USDA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 46 counties in six states—Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia—as crop disaster areas in two separate declarations.

Drought conditions and lack of moisture

USDA has declared the following counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin as crop disaster areas due to losses caused by drought conditions and lack of moisture that occurred September 1 – November 15, 2013.

  • Minnesota:  Kanabec, Morrison, Pine, Aitkin, Carlton, Chisago, Isanti, Benton, Cass, Crow Wing, Mille Lacs, Stearns and Todd counties.
  • Wisconsin: Douglas and  Burnett counties.

Excessive rain and flooding

USDA has also designated the following counties in The Carolinas, Tennessee and Virginia  as crop disaster areas due to excessive rain and flooding that began January 1, 2013, and continues.

  • North Carolina: Alleghany,  Granville, Polk, Ashe, Harnett, Wilkes, Alexander, Franklin, Moore, Vance, Caldwell, Henderson, Person, Wake, Chatham, Iredell, Rutherford, Watauga, Cumberland, Johnston, Sampson, Yadkin, Durham, Lee and Surry counties.
  • South Carolina:  Greenville and Spartanburg
  • Tennessee: Johnson County.
  • Virginia:  Grayson, Halifax and Mecklenburg counties.

Crop Disasters 2013

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 4,447 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 46 states in 2013.

State and County level records of calendar year 2013 disaster designations made by the USDA include losses and damages caused by one or more of the following

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation
  • Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat
  • High Temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and December 18, 2013.

Recent Federal and Agriculture Disaster Declarations

Posted in Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Global Disasters 2014, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Crop Disaster Areas Declared across 4 States

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

22 Counties across four states declared crop disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 22  counties in four states as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by excessive rains and flooding that began May 5, 2013, and continues.

The disaster areas are

Vermont: Addison, Chittenden, Grand Isle, Rutland, Bennington, Essex, Orange, Caledonia, Franklin, Orleans, Windham, Washington, Windsor and Lamoille counties.

Massachusetts: Berkshire and Franklin counties.

New Hampshire: Cheshire, Coos, Grafton and  Sullivan counties.

New York:  Rensselaer and Washington counties.

Crop Disaster 2013

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,924 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 44 states, so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation
  • Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat
  • High Temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and November 20, 2013.

Recent Crop Disaster Designations

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Crop Disaster Declared for 123 Counties in 10 States

Posted by feww on October 18, 2013

Excessive Rain, Freezing Temps and Extreme Heat Cause Agricultural Disaster in 10 States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated at least 123 additional counties as agricultural disaster areas across 10 states.

The crop disasters areas are in the states of Connecticut, Idaho, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Washington.

USDA issued a total of 6 separate disaster declarations on October 1, which were posted on their website on October 17, 2013 due to the government shutdown.

New York – First Disaster Designation due to damages caused by excessive rain and related flooding, high winds and hail that began May 1, 2013 and continues.

Disaster areas are Albany, Essex, Monroe, Otsego, Seneca, Broome, Franklin, Montgomery, Putnam, Sullivan, Cayuga, Fulton, Oneida, Rensselaer, Ulster, Chenango, Genesee, Ontario, Saratoga, Washington, Clinton, Greene, Orange, Schenectady, Wayne, Columbia, Herkimer, Orleans, Schoharie, Westchester, Cortland, Jefferson, Oswego, Schuyler, Wyoming, Dutchess, Madison, Allegany, Delaware, Livingston, St. Lawrence, Tompkins, Bronx, Erie, Niagara, Steuben, Warren, Cattaraugus, Hamilton, Onondaga, Tioga, Yates, Chemung, Lewis and Rockland counties.

Also included in the above designation

  • Connecticut: Fairfield and Litchfield counties.
  • Massachusetts: Berkshire County.
  • New Jersey: Passaic and Sussex counties.
  • Pennsylvania: Pike, Susquehanna and Wayne counties.
  • Vermont: Addison, Bennington, Chittenden, Grand Isle and
    Rutland counties.

New York – Second Disaster Designation due to damages and losses caused by freeze and frost that occurred March 13 – May 28, 2013.

Crop Disaster Areas: Cayuga, Columbia and Oswego, Albany, Greene, Madison, Rensselaer, Ulster, Cortland, Jefferson, Oneida, Seneca, Wayne, Dutchess, Lewis, Onondaga and Tompkins counties.

Also included in the above designation

  • Massachusetts: Berkshire County.

New York – Third Disaster Designation due to damages and losses caused by weather-related disease and fungi infestation that began June 19, 2013, and continues.

Disaster areas are Cayuga, Cortland, Oswego, Tompkins, Onondaga, Seneca and Wayne counties.

Oregon – Disaster Designation 1

USDA has designated three counties in Oregon as crop disaster areas due to damages caused by freezing temperatures that occurred April 8-30, 2013.  The counties are Baker, Umatilla and Union.

Also included in the above designation

  • Minnesota: Grant, Malheur, Morrow and Wallowa counties
  • Idaho: Adams and Washington counties.
  • Washington: Benton, Columbia and Walla Walla counties.

Oregon – Disaster Designation 2

USDA has designated nine counties in Oregon and Washington as crop disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by freezing temperatures and excessive rain that occurred March 22 – June 30, 2013.

  • Oregon: Wasco , Clackamas, Hood River, Marion, Wheeler, Gilliam, Jefferson and Sherman counties
  • Washington: Klickitat County

Oregon – Disaster Designation 3

USDA has designated nine counties in Oregon and Washington as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by freezing temperatures and extreme heat that occurred April 8 – May 13, 2013. Those counties are

  • Oregon: Gilliam, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Wasco and Wheeler counties.
  • Washington: Benton and Klickitat counties.

[All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Oct. 1, 2013.]

The latest designations raise the total [listed] crop disaster areas to at least 3,844 counties across 44 states so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation, Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Freezing Temperatures and Excessive Rain
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive Heat, High temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, Wet Weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease
  • Freezing Temperatures
  • Extreme Heat
  • Excessive Rain and Related Flooding
  • High Winds and Hail
  • Weather-related Disease and Fungi Infestation

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The counties listed above as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and September 25, 2013.

Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill.These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage.

Related Links

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Crop Disaster Losses 2013

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

Disaster Declarations USDA: 3,721 County-level crop disasters in 38 states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,721 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 38 states so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation, Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat, High temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and September 25, 2013.

Posted in Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Disaster Declared for 204 Counties in 10 States

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, disaster calendar, disaster diary, disaster watch, disaster watch 2013, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, global drought | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Agricultural Disaster Declared for 204 Counties

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Agricultural Disaster Declared for 194 Counties in 13 States

Posted by feww on September 20, 2013

Drought and Deluge Prompt Disaster Declarations in Multiple Regions across U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 194 counties in 13 states across 5 regions as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused either by drought, or by one or more of hail, severe freezing, excessive snow, excessive rain and flooding.

  • As of September 18, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.
  • Since September 11, 2013 a total of 332 counties have been designated as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

[Notes: 1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas. 2. The USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is a 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop. 3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

Drought Disaster

USDA has designated a total of eight counties in Idaho and Montana as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

  • Idaho: Clearwater, Lewis, Idaho, Latah, Nez Perce and Shoshone counties.
  • Montana: Mineral and Missoula counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning January 1, 2013

USDA has designated 102 counties in five states—Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began January 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Alabama (64 Counties):  Autauga, Cleburne, Geneva, Macon, Baldwin, Coosa, Greene, Madison, Barbour, Covington, Hale, Marengo, Blount, Crenshaw, Henry, Mobile, Bullock, Cullman, Houston, Monroe, Calhoun, Dale, Jackson, Montgomery, Cherokee, Dallas, Jefferson, Morgan, Chilton, Elmore, Lamar, Perry, Choctaw, Etowah, Lauderdale, Pickens, Clarke, Fayette, Lowndes, Pike, Russell, St. Clair, Shelby, Sumter, Talladega, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, Washington, Wilcox, Bibb, Coffee, Escambia, Marion, Butler, Colbert, Lawrence, Marshall, Chambers, Conecuh, Lee, Randolph, Clay, De Kalb, Limestone and Winston counties.
  • Florida (5 Counties):  Escambia, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa and Walton.
  • Georgia (13 Counties): Carroll, Clay, Floyd, Polk, Chattahoochee, Dade, Haralson, Quitman, Chattooga, Early , Muscogee, Seminole and Stewart.
  • Mississippi (11 Counties): Clarke, Jackson, Lowndes, Tishomingo, George, Kemper, Monroe, Wayne, Greene, Lauderdale and Noxubee.
  • Tennessee (7 Counties): Franklin, Hardin, Lincoln, Wayne, Giles, Lawrence and Marion counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning May 1, 2013

USDA has designated 54 counties in three states—The Carolinas and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began May 1, 2013, and continues.

  • North Carolina (41 Counties): Avery, Cleveland, Henderson, Rutherford, Brunswick, Columbus, Madison, Transylvania, Buncombe, Durham, Orange, Watauga, Wilson, Alamance, Chatham, Jackson, New Hanover, Ashe, Edgecombe, Johnston, Pender, Bladen, Gaston, Lincoln, Burke, Granville, McDowell, Pitt, Caldwell, Greene, Mitchell, Polk, Caswell, Haywood, Nash, Person, Robeson, Wake, Wayne, Wilkes and Yancey counties.
  • South Carolina (8 Counties): Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Spartanburg, Dillon, Horry, Pickens and York counties.
  • Tennessee (5 Counties): Carter, Cocke, Greene, Johnson and Unicoi.

Disasters caused by combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013

USDA has designated 22 counties in Minnesota and Iowa as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to the combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013.

  • Minnesota (18 Counties): Dodge, Koochiching, Mower, Steele, Freeborn, Lake of the Woods, Olmsted, Beltrami, Goodhue, Roseau, Waseca, Faribault, Itasca, St. Louis, Winona, Fillmore, Rice and Wabasha counties.
  • Iowa (4 Counties): Howard, Mitchell, Winnebago and Worth.

Hail Disaster on August 6, 2013

USDA has designated 8 counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by hail that occurred August 6, 2013.

  • Minnesota: Dakota, Goodhue, Ramsey, Scott, Hennepi, Rice and Washington counties.
  • Wisconsin: Pierce County.

Related Links

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Agricultural Disaster Declared for Dozens of U.S. Counties

Posted by feww on August 8, 2013

Dozens of counties across 5 States designated as agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 30 counties across five states as agricultural disaster area due to damages and losses caused by various climatic and extreme weather disasters including the ongoing drought, frost, excessive rain and a tornado. [Several counties received two separate disaster designations.]

Drought Disaster Declared in Oregon

USDA has designated 8 counties in Oregon as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by the ongoing drought.

  • Oregon counties designated as agricultural disaster areas: Baker, Grant, Crook, Malheur, Umatilla, Wallowa, Harney, Morrow, Union and Wheeler.
  • Idaho counties designated as disaster areas because they’re contiguous: Adams and Washington

Drought Disaster Declared in Idaho

Idaho counties designated as disaster agricultural disaster areas: Washington, Adams, Gem and Payette.

Oregon counties designated as disaster areas because they’re contiguous: Baker and Malheur.

Pennsylvania Agricultural Disaster Declaration No. 1

USDA has declared agricultural disaster in Pennsylvania due to frost, excessive rain and a tornado in Erie, Crawford and Warren counties.

The disaster designation is extended to include Chautauqua County in New York and Ashtabula County in Ohio.

Pennsylvania Agricultural Disaster Declaration No. 2

USDA has designated 5 counties in Pennsylvania—Mercer, Butler, Crawford, Lawrence, Venango—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages caused by excessive rain that occurred July 3-13, 2013.

Ohio Agricultural Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated Mahoning and Trumbull counties in Ohio as  agricultural disaster areas because they are contiguous.

For a list of recent Disaster Declarations see entries posted at

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Disaster declared due to drought, derecho, extreme weather, Hurricane Sandy, snowstorm, nor’easter

Posted by feww on February 15, 2013

U.S. Disasters 2013: Drought, derecho, hail, excessive heat, excessive rain, flash flooding, Hurricane Sandy, a snowstorm and a nor’easter

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 21 counties in 4 states—New Jersey, Delaware,  New York, and Pennsylvania—as natural disaster areas, both primary and contiguous, due to damages and losses caused by the combined effects of drought, high winds (derecho), hail, excessive heat, excessive rain, flash flooding, Hurricane Sandy, a snowstorm and a nor’easter that occurred during the period of June 28 – November 8, 2012.

As of February 13, prior to the latest designations, about 980 counties, nearly a third of all U.S. counties, had been designated for 2013 crop disaster losses, USDA reported.

FIRE-EARTH Drought Links 2013

Mississippi Disaster Declaration

The White House has declared a major disaster exists in the State of Mississippi in the areas affected by severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding beginning on February 10, 2013, and continuing.

  • The worst affected areas are Forrest and Lamar Counties.

Related Links

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February 15, 2013 – DISASTER CALENDAR SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,121 Days Left 

Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.

  • SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,121 Days Left to ‘Worst Day’ in the brief Human  History
  • The countdown began on May 15, 2011 …

GLOBAL WARNINGS

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

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Disaster Declared in 94 Counties across 4 States

Posted by feww on July 3, 2012

Extreme Weather Events Cause Agricultural Disasters in  Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin

Damage and losses caused by the combined effects of blizzards, excessive snow, excessive heat, excessive rain, high winds, hail, freeze, frost, tornadoes, flooding and lightening that occurred between January 1 and May 11, 2012 prompted USDA to declare disaster in 94 counties across 4 states.

List of the 72 Michigan counties declared Primary Disaster Areas

List of 10 Michigan counties declared Contiguous Disaster Areas

The following 12 counties in Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin have also been designated as disaster areas because they are contiguous.

  • Indiana: Elkhart, Lagrange, La Porte, St. Joseph and Steuben counties.
  • Ohio: Fulton, Lucas and Williams counties.
  • Wisconsin: Florence, Forest, Marinette and Vilas counties.

March Heat, April Freezes

According to a report by the Central Region Climate Response Team, March Heat, April Freezes, March 2012 “was the warmest March on record for 25 states east of the Rockies, and for 15 other states this March ranked among the ten warmest.”

“During the middle of March maximum temperatures were averaging 40 degrees F above normal. Maximum temperatures regularly reached the low and mid 80s
well north into Wisconsin. Many locations broke daily records by more than 20 degrees F.”

However, April 2012 experienced “at least three significant cold air masses” that crept into the Midwest and caused freezing temperatures.

  • Iowa. The freeze caused a 50% destruction of the grape crop, about 90% damage to the apple and fruit tree blossoms and caused significant damage to corn and other crops.
  • Illinois. The 2012 apple crop in parts of the state was a total loss due to freeze on April 11.
    • “Sweet corn grower in Vermilion County planted sweet corn on March 19. Plants were up a couple of leaves when back‐to‐back freezes hit (26F and 27F), reducing stand by 5,000 plants per acre.
    • “Sleepy Creek Vineyard in Vermilion County reported earliest budding grapevines had 100 percent damage, and others had 80 percent damage.”
  • Michigan. “Thousands of acres of this year’s grape crop have been lost across southwest lower Michigan.
    • “A surveyor for National Grape Cooperative, better known as Welch’s Foods, said he went through hundreds of acres before even finding a live bud.  John Jasper estimates more than 10,000 acres were destroyed April 12, mostly in Berrien, Cass and Van Buren counties.
    • “Many apple, peach, cherry and blueberry orchards have also had substantial losses across northern Indiana and southern Lower Michigan.”
  • Wisconsin.  “Cherry growers in Door County, WI, anticipate losses of 70% …”
  • Kentucky.  Frost damaged apples, peaches, pears, plums, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and grapes to varying degrees across the state.
    • “Wheat harvest began two weeks early in Kentucky due to warm weather, but warm temperatures, and then a brief cold snap, have wreaked havoc on the crop’s yield, which some farmers say has been cut nearly in half. Some farmers are getting 12 bu/acre, compared to a normal of 80 bu/acre,” said the report (PDF file).

Other Global Disasters, Significant Events

Up-to-date weekly average CO2 at Mauna Loa

  • Week of June 24, 2012:     395.33 ppm
  • Weekly value from 1 year ago:     393.50 ppm
  • Weekly value from 10 years ago:     375.08 ppm

Recent Mauna Loa CO2

  • May 2012:     396.78 ppm
  • May 2011:     394.16 ppm
  • May 2002:    375.65 ppm
  • May 1962:     321.01 ppm
  • [1-year increase: 2.62 ppm; 10-year increase: 21.13 ppm; 50-year increase: 75.77 ppm]

Recent Global CO2

  • April 2012:     394.01 ppm (1-year increase: 2.18 ppm)
  • April 2011:     391.83 ppm

New Zealand Earthquake

  • A Richter magnitude 7.0 quake struck the Cook Strait, west coast of North Island, NZ, about 100km SSW of New Plymouth and 170 km north-west of Wellington (40.00°S, 173.75°E), at a depth of about 230km on Tuesday, July 3 2012 at 10:36UTC.
    • NO tsunami warning was issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center.
    • NO report of casualties, as of posting.
    • The quake shook Wellington and was felt as far away as the Bay of Plenty and Christchurch, reports said.

U.S. Heat Wave


US Weather Hazards Map, July 3, 2012. “The heat wave continues for a large portion of the central and eastern U.S., with high temperatures this afternoon forecast to be 10-15 degrees above normal. Combined with high levels of humidity, this will create dangerous heat index values as high as 100-110 degrees for locations such as Minneapolis, Chicago, Kansas City and St. Louis,” said NWS.

The core of the record heat in the central United States is forecast to move gradually to the east this week, however heat alerts and heat indices to 105 degrees will continue. “Much of the eastern half of the country will continue to bake under clear skies, high temperatures and a lack of significant rain,” said NOAA forecasters.

Continued relentless heat through most of the week from the Plains to the Atlantic Coast will dominate the weather events.

Current Warnings Prompted by Unrelenting Heat

Red Flag Warnings, Excessive Heat Warnings and Heat Advisories issued in parts of 26 states from Wyoming to North Carolina.

Heat Advisories

Heat Advisories are in effect until this evening for parts of the Northern Plains, Ohio Valley and the Southeast:

  • North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida.

Record Daily High Temperatures Nationwide – June 2012

All Time Record High Temperatures Nationwide – June 2012

Mid-Atlantic Derecho

  • Death toll has climbed to 22 after the weekend derecho that ravaged the Mid-Atlantic region, with at least 2 million utility customers, or an estimated 7 million people, experiencing power outages amid the continued heat.

Drought Emergency

  • Nebraska.  Gov. Heineman has declared a state emergency due to the drought conditions throughout the state of Nebraska.
    • “This declaration is important for continued efforts of state officials to ensure the safety of Nebraskans,” Heineman said. “This action is necessary as dry conditions are presenting an imminent threat to the ability of local governments to respond to drought conditions. Additionally, actions such as haying along the roadsides in Nebraska help with drought conditions.”
    • Nebraska has broken or tied scores of record high temperatures in recent days.
    • Extreme temperatures will continue over central and western Nebraska through at least Friday due to high pressure lingering over the Central Plains, NWS reported.
    • “As excessive heat and dry conditions continue, fire danger is high again today. In addition, isolated thunderstorms are possible this afternoon and evening in north central Nebraska and in the Panhandle. The very dry conditions will continue to make the use of fireworks and even power equipment hazardous.”

Map of U.S. Precipitation (7-day total)

Map of U.S. Precipitation as Percent of Normal (7-day total)

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012, Global Food Crisis, Global Food Shortages, global ghg emissions | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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