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Posts Tagged ‘imported food’

Salmonella Risk Prompts 4th Massive Food Recall

Posted by feww on March 11, 2010

Recall nos. 37  – 42 since March 5, 2010

1.7 million pounds of RTE Beef and Chicken Products Recalled

Texas Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Beef Taquito and Chicken Quesadilla Products due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Windsor Foods, a firm with operations in Lampasas, Texas, and Oakland, Miss., is recalling approximately 1.7 million pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) beef taquito and chicken quesadilla products that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of beef taquito and chicken quesadilla products contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. A recall of the ready-to-eat taquito and quesadilla products containing the HVP was warranted due to the determination that the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company at (877) 653-2181.

USDA Recall Classifications: Class I Recall
This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. Salmonella infections can be life-threatening, especially to those with weak immune systems, such as infants, the elderly, and persons with HIV infection or undergoing chemotherapy. The most common manifestations of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within eight to 72 hours. Additional symptoms may be chills, headache, nausea and vomiting that can last up to seven days.

Recall # 38. Texas Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Beef Product due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Ruiz Foods, Inc., a Denison, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 115,700 pounds of a ready-to-eat (RTE) beef product that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of beef product contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Due to potential Salmonella contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. A recall of the beef product was warranted because the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

  • 8.4 ounce boxes of “TORNADOS RANCHERO BEEF & CHEESE.”

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s Consumer Line at 1-800-SPANISH or 1-800-772-6474 .

Recall # 39. Ohio Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Bacon Base Product Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Nestlé Professional North America, a Cleveland, Ohio establishment, is recalling approximately 6,000 pounds of a ready-to-eat (RTE) bacon base product that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of bacon base contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Due to potential Salmonella contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. Although the HVP has already been recalled, as announced by FDA, the bacon base product packages bear the USDA mark of inspection on the outside of the case. A recall of this product was warranted due to the determination that the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

  • 1-lb. plastic cups of “MINOR’S BACON BASE.”

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company Customer Services at (800) 243-8822.

Recall # 40. Orval Kent Food Company, Inc. Voluntarily Recalls Culinary Circle Dips Due to Possible Health Risk

The Orval Kent dips are being recalled because they contain HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein) manufactured, distributed and recalled by Basic Food Flavors, Inc., Las Vegas, NV.

Consumers who have recently purchased the items listed below should not consume this product and should return it the store of purchase for a full refund or replacement.

Consumer Contact Information:
Consumers with questions may contact SUPERVALU Customer Service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 877 932 7948.

Recall # 41. Austinuts Of Dallas, Inc. Announces Voluntary Recall of Honey Mustard Pretzels

OR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Dallas, Texas – March 10, 2010 – Austinuts of Dallas, Inc. has issued a voluntary recall for

Honey Mustard Pretzels,
Lot number 61150/0280

because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The Austinuts Honey Mustard Pretzels were only distributed at Austinuts’ building sales in Dallas, Texas in 16 ounce clear zipper bags. Consumers having any of these products are urged to destroy them.

NO OTHER AUSTINUTS’ PRODUCTS ARE PART OF THIS RECALL. No illnesses have been reported to date in connection to the above product.

The pretzels were manufactured by National Pretzel Company of Lancaster, PA and were coated with a seasoning mix that included hydrolyzed vegetable protein recalled by Basic Food Flavors, Las Vagas, NV because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Consumers with any other recall questions may contact Austinuts of Dallas, Inc. (214) 739-6887 during normal business hours, Monday through Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Central Time. Consumers with questions or concerns about their health should contact their doctor immediately.

Recall # 42. McCormick Recall Due to Possible Health Risk from HVP Ingredient Expands to Include Additional “Best By” Dates

McCormick & Company, Incorporated (NYSE:MKC) is expanding a March 5, 2010 recall to include additional “Best By” dates of products manufactured with HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein) supplied by Basic Food Flavors of Las Vegas, Nevada, because the ingredient has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Recalled products were distributed nationwide and sold in retail stores.  Two of the recalled products were also distributed for sale in international markets.

Contact the McCormick Consumer Hotline at 1-800-632-5847 or consumer_affairs@mccormick.com for a replacement or reimbursement.  Live assistance is available on the Hotline from 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday and 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST on Saturday and Sunday.

E. coli O157:H7 Contamination

Recall Notification Report
CLASS I RECALL: Wholesale Level

WASHINGTON, March 2, 2010 – Randolph Packing Co. Inc., an Asheboro, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 96,000 pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The products subject to recall include:

  • Combo bin packages of “Randolph Packing Co., Inc. BONELESS BEEF.”
  • Combo bin packages of “Randolph Packing Co. Knuckles 90% & 94%.”
  • 30 lbs. boxes of “Beef Ribeye Rolls.”

Each package label bears the establishment number “EST. 6590″ inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The products were produced on February 25, 2010, and were distributed to federal establishments for further processing in Ill., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, and Va. None of these products are available directly to consumers.

The problem was discovered through FSIS microbiological sampling.

Related Links:

Posted in food recall, salmonella, Salmonella poisoning, salmonellosis, Windsor Foods | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Eat Local: How Cuba Survives

Posted by terres on December 21, 2008

This article from REUTERS is reproduced in full in the public interest and their right to know.

In “eat local” movement, Cuba is years ahead

By Esteban Israel

HAVANA (Reuters) – After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Cuba planted thousands of urban cooperative gardens to offset reduced rations of imported food.

A man works in a field in San Antonio de los Banos in Havana in this July 18, 2008 file photo. REUTERS/Enrique De La Osa/ Files. Image may be subject to copyright.

Now, in the wake of three hurricanes that wiped out 30 percent of Cuba’s farm crops, the communist country is again turning to its urban gardens to keep its people properly fed.

“Our capacity for response is immediate because this is a cooperative,” said Miguel Salcines, walking among rows of lettuce in the garden he heads in the Alamar suburb on the outskirts of Havana.

Salcines says he is hardly sleeping as his 160-member cooperative rushes to plant and harvest a variety of beets that takes just 25 days to grow, among other crops.

As he talks, dirt-stained men and women kneel along the furrows, planting and watering on land next to a complex of Soviet-style buildings. Machete-wielding men chop weeds and clear brush along the periphery of the field.

Around 15 percent of the world’s food is grown in urban areas, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a figure experts expect to increase as food prices rise, urban populations grow and environmental concerns mount.

Since they sell directly to their communities, city farms don’t depend on transportation and are relatively immune to the volatility of fuel prices, advantages that are only now gaining traction as “eat local” movements in rich countries.

ROOFTOPS AND PARKING LOTS

In Cuba, urban gardens have bloomed in vacant lots, alongside parking lots, in the suburbs and even on city rooftops.

They sprang from a military plan for Cuba to be self-sufficient in case of war. They were broadened to the general public in response to a food crisis that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union, Cuba’s biggest benefactor at the time.

They have proven extremely popular, occupying 35,000 hectares (86,000 acres) of land across the Caribbean island. Even before the hurricanes, they produced half of the leaf vegetables eaten in Cuba, which imports about 60 percent of its food.

“I don’t say they have the capacity to produce enough food for the whole island, but for social and also agricultural reasons they are the most adequate response to a crisis,” said Catherine Murphy, a U.S. sociologist who has studied Cuba’s urban gardens.

GREEN PRODUCTIVITY

In Alamar, the members get a salary and share the garden’s profits, so the more they grow, the more they earn. They make an average of about 950 pesos, or $42.75, per month, more than double the national average, Salcines said.

The co-op, which began in 1997, now produces more than 240 tons of vegetables annually on its 11 hectares (27 acres) of land, which is about the size of 13 soccer fields.

The gardens sell their produce directly to the community and, out of necessity, grow their crops organically.

“Urban agriculture is going to play a key role in guaranteeing the feeding of the people much more quickly than the traditional farms,” said Richard Haep, Cuba coordinator for German aid group Welthungerhilfe, which has supported these kinds of projects since 1994.

When the Soviet Union fell apart, Cuba’s supply of oil slowed to a trickle, hurting big state agricultural operations. Chemical fertilizers were replaced with mountains of manure, and beneficial insects were used instead of pesticides.

Unlike in developed countries, where organic products are more expensive, in Cuba they are affordable.

“We have taken organic agriculture to a social level,” said Salcines.

Some experts fear that rising international food prices along with the destruction of the hurricanes will return Cuba to the path of agrochemicals. The government is planning to construct a fertilizer plant with its oil-rich ally Venezuela.

But Raul Castro, who replaced ailing brother Fidel Castro as president in February, has also borrowed ideas from the urban gardens as he implements reforms to cut the island’s $2.5 billion in annual food imports, much of it from the United States.

Castro has decentralized farm decision-making and raised the prices that the state pays for agricultural products, which has increased milk production, for example, by almost 20 percent.

And, in September, the government began renting out unused state-owned lands to farmers and cooperatives, measures that met with approval of international aid groups.

“Decentralization and economic incentives. If those elements are expanded to the rest of the agricultural sector, the response will be the same,” said Welthungerhilfe’s Haep.

(Reporting by Esteban Israel; Editing by Jeff Franks and Eddie Evans)

Posted in Cuba, economy for community, organic crops, profit share, urban gardens | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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