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Mass die-offs from human impact and planetary response to the assault could occur by early 2016

Posts Tagged ‘Saipan’

Powerful Earthquake Strikes Mariana Islands Region

Posted by feww on August 14, 2010

Quake measuring up to 7.4Mw strikes WSW of Hagatna, Guam

Epicentered at 12.409°N, 141.487°E, the quake struck about 375 km (230 miles) WSW of HAGATNA, Guam, at a depth of 4.7km on August 13, 2010 at 21:19:32 UTC, USGS/EHP reported.

Aftershocks

The mainshock was followed by about a dozen aftershocks, the largest of which measured up to 6.6Mw, as of posting.

Tsunami
NO Pacific-wide destructive tsunami was expected, NWS Pacific Tsunami Center said.

Earthquake Details

  • Magnitude: 7.2
  • Date-Time:
    • Friday, August 13, 2010 at 21:19:32 UTC
    • Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 07:19:32 AM at epicenter
  • Location: 12.409°N, 141.487°E
  • Depth 4.7 km (2.9 miles) (poorly constrained)
  • Region MARIANA ISLANDS REGION
  • Distances:
    • 375 km (230 miles) WSW of HAGATNA, Guam
    • 445 km (275 miles) WSW of Rota, Northern Mariana Islands
    • 485 km (300 miles) NE of Yap, Micronesia
    • 550 km (340 miles) WSW of SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands
  • Location Uncertainty:  horizontal +/- 14.6 km (9.1 miles); depth +/- 5.1 km (3.2 miles)
  • Source: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
  • Event ID: us2010zxcf

10-degree Map Centered at 10°N,140°E


Earthquake Location Map. Source: USGS/EHP. Enhanced by FEWW.

Posted in earhquake hazard, earthquake, earthquake 2010, Earthquake news | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Global Volcanoes Rehearsing?

Posted by feww on June 1, 2010

Submarine Volcano Erupts Near Sarigan Island

An underwater volcano off Sarigan Island, Northern Marianas, about 160km (100 miles) north of the island of Saipan erupted on Saturday sending a plume of steam and ash cloud into the air and showering  the ocean surface with volcanic debris, US officials reported on Monday.

“An EMO observer aboard an overflight yesterday reported a large area of debris floating in the sea south of the island, and a stationary area of discoloration in the water, presumably above the vent. The crew on Sarigan reported passage of a small wave (less than 0.5 m) following onset of the eruption yesterday.” USGS said.

However, satellite images show no sign of ongoing activity, USGS said.

“Seismicity at a single nearby station on Sarigan Island declined soon after the eruption of a large steam and ash cloud from a submarine vent 11 km (7 miles) south of Sarigan Volcano early yesterday. Satellite images show no sign of ongoing activity.”

Scientists had initially thought the volcanic cloud came from either of the Anatahan or Sarigan volcano, and later verified the source by the trail of debris and water discoloration close to the vent,  a USGS official said.

The Northern Mariana Islands are located about 6100km (3,800 miles) southwest of Hawaii.

Summary of Volcano Details (USGS):

  • Volcano Location: N 16 deg 42 min E 145 deg 46 min
  • Area: Mariana Islands
  • Summit Elevation: 1765 ft (538 m)
  • Volcanic Activity Summary: Seismicity and subaqueous eruptive activity have declined at Sarigan Volcano prompting reduction of the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcanic Activity Level to ADVISORY.

Major Volcanoes of the Mariana Islands (USGS)

Click image to enlarge.

Barren Island

A M6.4 quake (11.119°N, 93.698°E) which struck close to Barren Island Monday, May 31, 2010 at 19:51:48 UTC, may have triggered the Andaman Sea volcano for eruption.

Related Links:

Posted in US Volcanoes, volcanic activity, volcanic ash, volcanic eruption, volcanic event | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

Pagan Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on April 18, 2009

Pagan Volcano on Pagan, Northern Mariana Islands, Erupts

Pagan Volcano on Pagan, Northern Mariana Islands, about 500 km north of Guam, erupted on Friday sending smoke and steam into the atmosphere.

The US national weather service issued a haze alert for the Mariana Islands after Pagan  erupted on Friday. NWS said residents in Guam have nothing to worry about [for now] as winds are driving the smoke away from Guam.

If the wind direction changes, however, ash and haze may be redirected toward populated islands of Saipan and Guam SSW of the Marianas.

The Pagan volcano is believed to have erupted seven times since 1985. [See: Pagan Eruptive History]

Pagan

Country: United States
Region: Mariana Islands, Pacific Ocean (East of Philippine Sea)
Volcano Type: Stratovolcanoes
Last Known Eruption: 2006
Summit Elevation: 570 m (1,870 feet)
Latitude: 18.13°N (18°8’0″N)
Longitude: 145.80°E (145°48’0″E)


Pagan Island, the largest and one of the most active of the Mariana Islands volcanoes, consists of two stratovolcanoes connected by a narrow isthmus. Both North and South Pagan stratovolcanoes were constructed within calderas, 7 and 4 km in diameter, respectively. The 570-m-high Mount Pagan at the NE end of the island rises above the flat floor of the northern caldera, which probably formed during the early Holocene. South Pagan is a 548-m-high stratovolcano with an elongated summit containing four distinct craters. Almost all of the historical eruptions of Pagan, which date back to the 17th century, have originated from North Pagan volcano. The largest eruption of Pagan during historical time took place in 1981 and prompted the evacuation of the sparsely populated island. Photo by Norm Banks, 1983 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP.

Northern Mariana Islands

Made up of fifteen islands, the Northern Mariana Islands are located east of the  Philippine Sea about 500 km north of Guam, with a population of about 82,000 (most recent estimate).  Only three of the islands, Rota, Saipan (the largest island and capital of Northern Mariana islands with a population of about 65,000) and Tinian have a significant population, compared with the islands of Agrihan and Alamagan, which have just a few residents. The  remaining ten islands are unpopulated.


Map of the Northern Mariana Islands by the US Department of Interior.

Pagan Erupted in 2006 – GVP Archives (6-12 December 2006)

During 4-5 December, residents 3 km SW of Pagan reported ashfall that accumulated in their camp at a rate of about 6.4 mm per day. They also described a plume from the summit that rose to an altitude of 640 m (2,100 ft) a.s.l. and a sulfur smell that occasionally wafted through their camp. Based on satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported a gas-and-ash plume that drifted mainly W on 5, 6, and 8 December. Satellite imagery showed no further activity through 11 December.

Pagan Erupted in 1981


A fissure that formed during an eruption of Pagan volcano in the Mariana Islands in 1981 cuts across the summit of the volcano. Three principal vents were active along the fissure. A cinder cone (foreground) was constructed on the north flank, and vents on the north and south rims of the summit crater fed lava flows that traveled down the flanks of North Pagan volcano. This June 16, 1981 photo shows South Pagan volcano at the upper right. Photo by U.S. Navy, 1981. Caption: GVP.

Posted in Agrihan, Alamagan, Guam, Tinian, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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