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Mass die-offs from human impact and planetary response to the assault could occur by early 2016

Posts Tagged ‘volcano’

Chaparrastique Spews More Ash, Volcanic Gases

Posted by feww on December 31, 2013

Chaparrastique Volcano in Eastern El Salvador is Still Spewing Ash and Volcanic Gases

Up to 5,000 people live near the volcano, and the authorities have so far evacuated more than 1,600 to emergency shelters, but many have refused to leave their homes on the volcano slopes.

“The Chaparrastique volcano is still producing gases combined with small emissions of ash, which is normal after an eruption,” said  El Salvador’s environment ministry.

The 2,130-m high volcano,  El Salvador’s third highest, ejected columns of smoke and ash up to 5km above the summit on Sunday

Chaparrastique, aka San Miguel volcano, located about 15km SW of San Miguel city (population: 180,000), and about 140 km east of San Salvador, the capital, showed signs of increased activity on December 13.

The eruption has so far deposited more than 10cm of ash in the nearby areas within the coffee-producing region, according to reports.

chaparistique - Elsalvador-dotcom
Latest image of Chaparistique Eruption. Source: El-Salvador.com

ash from san migul eruption on coffee plants
 Chaparistique eruption deposits volcanic ash on coffee plants. Source: El-Salvador.com

El Salvador

El Salvador sits along the Pacific Ring of Fire, close to Middle America Trench, and is subject to significant tectonic movement, causing frequent earthquakes and volcanic activity. The tiny country (population: 6.3 million) is home to at least 23 volcanoes.

Middle America Trench

A major subduction zone known for many large earthquakes, the Middle America Trench is a 2,800-km long oceanic trench in the eastern Pacific Ocean, extending from central Mexico to Costa Rica. The trench is the boundary between five tectonic plates, including the Caribbean, Cocos (and Rivera), Nazca, the North American and the South American plates.

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Chaparrastique Eruption Forces Mass Evacuations in El Salvador

Posted by feww on December 30, 2013

Chaparrastique volcano eruption prompts evacuation of hundreds of communities

Civil protection authorities in El Salvador have imposed a 5-km exclusion zone around the San Miguel volcano, aka Chaparrastique, and are evacuating up to 5,000 villagers that live near the volcano.

The 2,130-m high volcano,  El Salvador’s third highest, ejected columns of smoke and ash up to 5km above the summit.

Chaparrastique, located about  15km SW of San Miguel city (population: 180,000), showed signs of increased activity on December 13.

The eruption has so far deposited more than 10cm of ash in the nearby areas within the coffee-producing region, officials said.

CHAPARRASTIQUE erupts 29-12-13
Chaparrastique erupts. Screen dump from a local news report timed at about 10:30 am local time December 29, 2013.

El Salvador

El Salvador sits along the Pacific Ring of Fire, close to Middle America Trench, and is subject to significant tectonic movement, causing frequent earthquakes and volcanic activity. The tiny country (population: 6.3 million) is home to at least 23 volcanoes.

Related Links

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcano alert, volcano erupts, Volcano Hazards, volcano images, Volcano News, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Thousands Flee Mount Sinabung Eruption

Posted by feww on September 16, 2013

Mount Sinabung records first eruption in 3 years

Thousands of people from 12 villages near the volcano located in North Sumatra’s Karo regency were forced to flee their homes after Mount Sinabung erupted on Sunday, it’s first eruption since 2010, reports said.

The volcano erupted at at 2:45 a.m. local time and continued to eject volcanic matter for at least 7 hours.

“There is the potential for another eruption; therefore, we are calling on people to remain alert,” said the Geological Disaster Mitigation and Volcanology Center (PVMBG).

Mt Sinabung erupted in August 2010 after 410 years of dormancy. The eruption claimed a dozen lives and displaced thousands of others.

The eruption which occurred on August 29, 2010 was followed by a more powerful explosion the next day, and much stronger blast on September 7, 2010.

Mount Sinabung -ANTARA
Mount Sinabung spewing volcanic ashes as seen from Simpang Empat Village in Karo, North Sumatera (9/15). Credit:  ANTARA/Septianda Perdana. 


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history, said a report.

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Pavlof Eruption Intensifies

Posted by feww on June 26, 2013

Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano ejects a plume 28,000 feet asl

Pavlof is erupting vigorously, exhibiting strongest seismic activity detected so far this year, characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent explosions suggesting lava fountaining and ash production, Alaska Volcanoes Observatory (AVO) reported.

The wave of intense activity started late on Monday and continued into Tuesday, with trace ash fall reported in the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano.

AVO Daily Update  – Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 12:33 PM AKDT (Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 20:33 UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37″ W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code:   ORANGE
In its daily briefing AVO said:

Vigorous eruptive activity indicated by a distinct increase in seismicity beginning around 6:50 UTC (22:50 AKDT) last evening is continuing. The level of seismicity for the past 11-12 hours has been the strongest seismic activity detected so far during the 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The seismicity is characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent small explosions that are likely associated with lava fountaining and ash production.

  • A distinct plume extending to the west of the volcano rising as high 28,000 feet above sea level (a.s.l.) according to Satellite data and pilot reports.
  • Satellite imagery also show strong thermal signals at the volcano summit.
  • AVO received a report of trace ash fall on the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano on June 25, 2013.

pavlof 7jun2013
Pavlof volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay on June 7, 2013. Photo credit: Robert Sigurdson, via AVO.

At this level of unrest it is likely that lava fountaining and ash emission are occurring. Lava fountaining is likely producing spatter-fed lava flows that are descending the flanks of the volcano over ice and snow and could be producing substantial steam plumes. These plumes probably contain variable amounts of ash. At the level of unrest observed over the past 11-12 hours, the volcanic plume has not been particularly ash rich; however, this could change if the character of the eruption changes and it remains possible for more robust ash plumes to be generated at any time. AVO is monitoring the eruption closely and will issue further information as it becomes available.

Mount Pavlof, one of the most active volcanoes in the U.S.,  has been erupting since May 13, spewing ash and lava at a low intensity.


Index map showing the location of Pavlof and other Quaternary volcanoes on the Alaskan peninsula. Volcano(es): Alagogshak, Amak, Aniakchak, Basalt of Gertrude Creek, Black Peak, Chiginagak, Cone 3110, Cone 3601, Dana, Denison, Devils Desk, Douglas, Dutton, Fourpeaked, Frosty, Griggs, Iron Trig cone, Kaguyak, Katmai, Kejulik, Kialagvik, Knob 1000, Kukak, Kupreanof, Mageik, Martin, Novarupta, Pavlof, Pavlof Sister, Rainbow River cone, Steller, Stepovak Bay 1, Stepovak Bay 2, Stepovak Bay 3, Stepovak Bay 4, Trident, Ugashik-Peulik, Unnamed (near Ukinrek Maars), Veniaminof, Yantarni. Credit Janet Schaefer/AVO

Veniaminof Volcano Activity [Source: AVO]

Continued volcanic tremors  suggest that the Veniaminof Volcano is still erupting, said AVO. Recent satellite images  show elevated surface temperatures at the intracaldera cone; webcam images from Perryville show a light-colored plume rising above the rim of the intracaldera cone, some 8,200 feet a.s.l.

It is possible for activity at Veniaminof Volcano to increase above its current level at any time and more vigorous ash emissions may result. Sustained periods of volcanic tremor may correspond with continuous ash emission which may not be detected in satellite data, especially if ash plumes remain below 15,000 to 20,000 feet above sea level. Brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions with ash fall limited to areas on the flanks of the volcano are likely to occur while the volcano is at its current level of unrest. A larger explosive episode and associated ash emission is not expected at the current level of unrest; however, this remains possible and would be evident in seismic and satellite data.

Current Volcanic Activity [as of June 26, 2013]

Alaska 

Cleveland YELLOW ADVISORY
Pavlof  ORANGE  WATCH
Veniaminof ORANGE  WATCH

Kamchatka Peninsula

Gorely YELLOW
Karymsky ORANGE
Kizimen ORANGE
Tolbachik ORANGE
Bezymianny YELLOW
Sheveluch ORANGE

Kurile Islands

Chirinkotan YELLOW

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Volcanoes in a Dozen Global Regions Erupting

Posted by feww on May 19, 2013

Angry Pavlof continues to belch out ash, gas and steam

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37″ W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Ash, gas and steam emissions continue at Pavlof Volcano, as  seismic tremors and intense elevated surface temperatures persist, AVO reported.

Pavlof volcano eruption column 18May2013 T-Chesley
Pavlof volcano eruption column, May 18, 2013 (12:00am AKDT). Photo courtesy Theo Chesley/AVO.

Other Alaska Volcanoes

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20″ N 169°56’42″ W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Elevated surface temperatures at the summit of Cleveland Volcano were observed in satellite images Saturday morning AKDT, AVO reported.

Hawaii Volcanoes

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-01-)
19°25’16″ N 155°17’13″ W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: At the summit, tiltmeters recorded the start of DI inflationary tilt and the lava lake level rose. At Pu`u `O`o vent in the middle east rift zone, there was no new activity within the crater but the Kahauale`a II lava flow remained active on the north base of the cone. To the southeast, the Peace Day pali flow remained active on the coastal plain while the main flow branch continued to enter the ocean in at least 2 locations spanning the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park boundary. Gas emissions remained elevated. (HVO)

Recent Observations at the middle east rift zone vents: Only glow was seen from the east lava pond and spatter cones on the crater floor. The tiltmeter on the north flank of Pu`u `O`o cone recorded the start of DI inflationary tilt at 8 pm yesterday. GPS receivers on the north rim and south base of Pu`u `O`o cone recorded neither extension nor contraction since May 12. The most recent (preliminary) sulfur dioxide emission rate measurement was 300 tonnes/day on April 26, 2013, from all east rift zone sources; these values have ranged between 150 and 450 t/d in 2013; these measurements are made at a greater distance from the sources where the plume is more easily characterized.

New Activity/Unrest
[Source: AVO, HVO, GVP and others]

  • Cleveland, Chuginadak Island (ALASKA)
  • Copahue, Central Chile-Argentina border
  • Dieng Volcanic Complex, Central Java (Indonesia)
  • Guntur, Western Java (Indonesia)
  • Mayon, Luzon (Philippines)
  • Pavlof, Alaska Peninsula
  • Popocatépetl, México
  • Tungurahua, Ecuador

Ongoing Activity

  • Kilauea, Hawaii (USA)
  • Kizimen, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Karymsky, Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Paluweh, Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)
  • Reventador, Ecuador
  • Sabancaya, Perú
  • Sakura-jima, Kyushu (Japan)
  • Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Tolbachik, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Bezymianny, Kamchatka (Russia) YELLOW
  • Gorely Volcano  YELLOW

VONA/KVERT DAILY REPORT – May 17, 2013
Kamchatkan and Northern Kuriles Volcanic Activity

SHEVELUCH VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-27-)
56.64 N, 161.32 E; Elevation 10768 ft (3,283 m), the dome elevation ~8200 ft (2500 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

Moderate seismic activity continues at the volcano. Video images showed a moderate gas-steam eruption and incandescence above the lava dome. Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano.

PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-24-)
55.83 N, 160.39 E; Elevation 10119 ft (3085 m)
Aviation Color Code is ORANGE

Strong seismicity occurring at the volcano. The amplitude of volcanic tremor was up to 3.2 mcm/s. Explosive-effusive eruption continues: lava continues to effuse from the Southern fissure on Tolbachinsky Dol. A thermal anomaly was noted on satellite images at the northern area of Tolbachinsky Dol.

KIZIMEN VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-23-)
55.13 N, 160.32 E; Elevation 8151 ft (2485 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

Moderate seismic activity continues at Kizimen. Video images  showed growth of an extrusion at the volcano summit continues. Incandescence of the volcano summit, hot avalanches on the western and eastern volcanic flanks, and strong and moderate gas-steam activity accompany this process. Satellite data showed the volcano was obscured by clouds.

KARYMSKY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-13-)
54.05 N, 159.44 E; Elevation 4874 ft (1486 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

There was no seismic data due to technical reasons. Satellite images  were obscured by clouds.

BEZYMIANNY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-25-)
55.97 N, 160.6 E; Elevation 9453 ft (2882 m)
Aviation Color Code is YELLOW

Strong seismic activity at Tolbachinsky Dol obscured seismicity of Bezymianny. WebCam images obscured by clouds.  Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano.

GORELY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-07-)
52.56 N, 158.03 E; Elevation 5996 ft (1828 m)
Aviation Color Code is YELLOW

Moderate seismic activity continues at Gorely. Volcano was obscured by clouds.

Related Links

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Global Disasters/ Significant Events Headlines – 6 April 2013

Posted by feww on April 6, 2013

Fukushima Nuke Plant Leaking Large Quantities of Radioactive Water

Up to 120 tons of radioactive water may have leaked from one of the seven underground storage tanks at Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, contaminating the surrounding ground, Tokyo Electric Power Co was reported as saying.

The storage tanks hold about 13,000 cubic meters of contaminated water, which  TEPCO is transferring to other tanks nearby, Kyodo news wire quoted the utility as saying.

Third large oil spill in 7 days: Shell Pipeline ruptures in Texas

Thousands of gallons of oil have spilled from Shell Pipeline in West Columbia, Texas, the third incident of the kind in a week, said a report.

Manatee death toll rising in Florida despite Red Tide ebbing

Red Tide, a deadly algae bloom, has killed at least 241 manatees in Florida so far this year, surpassing the previous record of 151 deaths set in 1996.

The recent Red Tide bloom in the Gulf of Mexico began in September 2012  covering a 70-mile (113-km) stretch of southwest Florida’s coast from Sarasota County to Lee County, which is  home to a large population of the state’s estimated 5,000 manatees, said a report.


Karenia brevis. Photo:  FFWCC

Meanwhile, deaths of 85 manatees since July on Florida’s Atlantic coast remain a mystery. The mass die-off occurred  in the Indian River Lagoon, Brevard County.

Mount Karangetang: A Mountain of Fire

Mount Karangetang
Lava spewes from the top of Mount Karangetang. Photo: AFP. Image may be subject to copyright.

  • One of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia, Karangetang, aka, Api Siau, is a located on the northern part of Siau Island.
  • Karangetang was one of the three volcanoes that erupted after the The Great East Japan Earthquake struck on March 11, 2011.

Frozen Britain

UK temperatures over the past week fell to among the coldest experienced in April for nearly 100 years, with maximum temperatures barely above the freezing in many parts of the southeast, reports said.

At -11.2ºC (11.8 degrees Fahrenheit), the village of Braemar in Scotland, about 90 km west of Aberdeen, held the joint coldest weather anywhere in the UK in April for nearly a century.

US Weather: Snow Impacting the Upper Midwest and Northern Great Lakes

‘A storm system moving through the Upper Midwest will bring a round of late-season winter weather to parts of the northern Great Lakes region on Saturday. The heaviest snow will fall from northeastern Minnesota through northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. These areas could see up to 6 inches of snow.’ NOAA reported.

Previous Global Disasters/ Significant Events Headlines

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Fuego Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on September 13, 2012

DISASTER CALENDAR SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,280 Days Left

[September 13, 2012] Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016. 

Global Disasters/ Significant Events

Guatemala’s Fuego volcano eruption forces tens of thousands of people to evacuate

Fuego’s powerful explosions ejected smoke and ash about 4km into the air, spewing two lava stream down the volcano flanks, accompanied by thousands of tons of volcanic ash and tephra.

About 35,000 people from two dozen villages nearest to the volcano have been evacuated, awaiting evacuation, or are on notice to abandon their homes depending on the wind direction, authorities said.

  • The 3,763 m volcano, dubbed the ‘Volcano of Fire,’  sits about 10km SW of the colonial city of Antigua (Pop: ~ 50,000) , Guatemala’s former capital, and is one of Central America’s most active volcanoes.

 

Related Links

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

GLOBAL WARNING

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San Cristóbal Eruption Forces Mass Evacuation

Posted by feww on September 9, 2012

DISASTER CALENDAR SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,284 Days Left

[September 9, 2012] Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016. 

  • SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,284 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History…

Nicaragua: 3,000 people are being evacuated as San Cristóbal volcano explodes

San Cristobal, Nicaragua’s highest volcano, exploded at least 3 times, expelling volcanic gases, ash and tephra about 1,500 meters into the air and forcing evacuations of thousands of people in the rural northwestern department of Chinandega.

Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

United States.  Red Flag Warnings/Extreme Fire Danger. Critical Fire Weather Conditions are expected across parts of the Great Basin, Northern Rockies and Great Plains on Sunday, NWS said. Red Flag Warnings are in effect for parts of at least 12 states.

  • “Thunderstorms with little or no rain coupled with abundant lightning will offer a threat for critical fire weather conditions across portions of the northern Rockies on Sunday. Meanwhile, strong winds and low relative humidity will also create locally dangerous fire weather conditions across the northern and central Great Basin as well as the northern and central Great Plains.” NWS forecasters said.


Weather Hazards Map. Source: NWS

Related Links

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

GLOBAL WARNING

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Beerenberg Volcano Could Explode

Posted by feww on May 25, 2012

FIRE-EARTH FORECAST: Beerenberg Volcano on Jan Mayen Island Could Erupt Explosively [P≥ 64%]

The 2,280-m stratovolcano located on Jan Mayen Island could erupt this year with a probability of at least 64 percent.

The 6.2Mw earthquake (72.994°N, 5.651°E; 8.8 km; Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 22:47:46 UTC) and its subsequent aftershocks that occurred in the Norwegian Sea may have primed the volcano for an explosive eruption.


Jan Mayen Island (71°N 8°30′W) featuring Beerenberg Volcano. Source: Jan Mayen

Jan Mayen (Norway) is a volcanic island  located in the north Atlantic Ocean, some 950km west of Norway and 600 km north of Iceland. The view of the island is dominated by the active volcano Beerenberg (2,280m), which last erupted in 1985, emitting an estimated total of about 2  x 107 m3 of lava and other volcanic matter.

Earthquake and Volcano Links

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Volcanic Ash Closes Parts of UK Airspace Again

Posted by feww on May 5, 2010

Iceland’s Volcanoes Could Potentially Cause Collapse of Europe

Eyjafjallajökull Volcanic Ash closes Airspace over Ireland and Scotland Once Again

Airspace over Northern Ireland and Scotland will be closed from 07:00 to 13:00GMT (UTC) on Wednesday due to a new cloud of volcanic ash drifting from Eyjafjallajökull Glacier volcano in Iceland, the UK Civil Aviation Authority said.

The ash cloud is expected to move further south, possibly forcing the closure of airspace in the NW England and north Wales today.

“The situation is very dynamic, so passengers expecting to travel from the impacted airports should contact their airlines to check whether their flight is operating,” CAA website said.


Volcanic Ash Advisory from London – Latest graphics   click image to enlarge


These images are monitoring for the presence of volcanic ash emission in the vicinity of Iceland using infrared data from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. Because cloud particles and volcanic ash particles interact with the infrared radiation in different ways, data at several different wavelengths can be combined to identify the main ash plume, which, when present, would be shown as yellow and orange colours in the images. Note that it is only the thicker parts of the plume that are able to be detected by this method. In addition, the ash plume is often masked by overlying high cloud. Source and Copyright EUMETSAT/Met Office.

A Webcam Image of Eyjafjallajökull Eruption saved by Icelandic Review yesterday. The webcams seemed to be out of action today.


One function of webcams is to prevent unnecessary traffic to the site of volcano, which could also be extremely hazardous.

Icelandic Met Office said:

Plume was observed at 5.8-6 km height (19-20,000 ft) estimated from the Icelandic Coast Guard (ICG) flight at 10:40 and 15:30 GMT. It is heading east-south-east to south-east from the eruption site. Plume track clearly visible up to 300-400 km distance from the eruption site on a NOAA satellite image at 13:13 GMT.

On lava flow they reported:

Lava is still flowing northwards, forming a lava fall down the steep hill under Gígjökull, about 4 km north of the crater. Blue gas is seen rising from the lava and white steam plumes are seen somewhat lower and mark the front of the lava stream. The size of the eruptive crater is 280 x 190 m. Lava splashes are thrown at least a few hundred meters into the air.

Status Report: 14:00UTC, 04 May 2010 – IMO and Earth Science Island:

Explosive activity and ash production is strong and has increased since yesterday. Dark ash plume rises above the crater. Lava is still flowing northwards, forming a lava fall down the steep hill under Gígjökull, about 4 km north of the crater. Blue gas is seen rising from the lava and white steam plumes are seen somewhat lower and mark the front of the lava stream. Radar images from ICG-flight today show tunnels in Gígjökull increasing in size and continuing the build up of the cone at the crater. The size of the eruptive crater is 280m x 190m. Lava splashes are thrown at least a few hundred meters into the air.

Related Links:

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Posted in environment, iceland volcanoes, Icelandic ash cloud, Icelandic volcano | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

Ragnarök [the End of the World]

Posted by feww on April 18, 2010

The sun turns dark

Earth sinks in the sea, the fair, bright stars disappear from the heavens

Ragnarök
The sun turns dark,
earth sinks in the sea,
the fair, bright stars
disappear from the heavens.
Sizzling blaze
around the tree of life
colossal heat plays with
the heavens. —Völuspá

The above stanzas were quoted from the famous Nordic poem Völuspá in the Iceland Review. Völuspá, Prophecy of the Völva, tells the story of creation of the world and how it comes to its end, and is arguably the most important source for understanding the Norse mythology.


Yggdrasil
, a modern representation of the world tree which is central to Norse mythology.  The world tree is a motif that appears in some Indo-European religions and mythologies. It is represented as a giant tree that supports the heavens, connects it to the earth, and the underground through its roots.

“It was like the sun had gone out in the middle of the day.”

Iceland Review editor Bjarni Brynjólfsson and photographer Páll Stefánsson wondered how it was to drive through the area affected by the eruption: “We tried driving into the darkness and it was like we had stepped into another dimension. We felt it was the end of the world as described in Völuspá, the old Icelandic Poem the tells the story of the end of the world called Ragnarök or Götterdämmerung in the famous opera by Wagner.” More …

What Happened to Disaster Tourism?


The rascals coiled their tails and ran for the coast. Nearby roads covered in a thick blanket of volcanic ash. Credit: Ómar Óskarsson via MBL-Is. Image may be subject to copyright.

For all previous entries and and related links click

See also

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Posted in Disaster Tourism, Norse mythology, Völuspá, Völva, Yggdrasil | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Eyjafjallajökull Eruption Intensifies

Posted by feww on April 17, 2010

Webcams Show Heightened Activity

Eruption at Eyjafjallajökull has steadily Intensified in the past 3 hours

Eyjafjallajökull has resumed explosive activity in the past 3 hours, having earlier slowed down to sporadically ejecting single plumes of ash once every 2 to 3 minutes.

The following are latest images obtained from two webcams that are trained on Eyjafjallajökull at Valahnúk and Hvolsvelli stations. The images show a constant stream of ash, steam and fumes spewed from the Icelandic volcano.The images are provided by Míla ehf and may be subject to copyright.


Valahnúk Webcam freeze frame of Eyjafjallajökull at 08:55UTC .


Hvolsvelli Webcam Image of Eyjafjallajokull also recorded at 08:55UTC.

The following irregular sequence of images were recorded from Hvolsvelli Webcam.


[L-R and T-B] Freeze frames shows a large plume of ash, steam and gasses ejected from the volcano just after sunrise at 5;16UTC on April 17, 2010. The ash plume seen in the first frame above dispersed (second frame) within minutes of being ejected from Eyjafjallajokull; however, after a series of explosions that occurred about 30 seconds later, another plume was ejected out of the volcano’s crater. The new plume seemed to be slightly larger than the previous one. Click image to enlarge.

Another sequence of images recorded simultaneously from Hvolsvelli and Valahnúk Webcams.


[T - B] The above freeze frames were recorded at about 5:31UTC, showing single plumes of ash and gasses ejected from
Eyjafjallajokul. Click image to enlarge.


[T - B] The above freeze frames were recorded at about 5:35UTC. Most of the frames show two plumes, indicating a gradual increase in the frequency of eruptions at Eyjafjallajokul. Click image to enlarge.


This frame was recorded at 5:40UTC showing 3 plumes which meant the eruptions at Eyjafjallajokul had further intensified. Click image to enlarge.

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Eyjafjallajökull – UPDATE Apr 17

Posted by feww on April 17, 2010

Eyjafjallajökull Still Erupting

40,000 flights grounded since Thursday to avoid engine failure from Eyjafjallajökull ash

A new round of flooding has affected the areas around Eyjafjallajokull, as hot gases from the volcano continue to break up and melt the glacier that covers it.

Huge volumes of floodwater and massive chunks of ice, some reportedly as large as 3-story apartment blocks, have forced about 1,000 locals to evacuate their homes, most of them for a second time in 3 days. The floodwaters have almost completely washed off a causeway along the flooded Markarfljot river, which was severely damaged in the first round of flooding.

According to a local report,  the eruption is somewhat weakening, and Eyjafjallajökull is producing less ash, for now.

Sunrise at Eyjafjallajokull


Valahnúk Webcam freeze frame of Eyjafjallajökull shortly after sunrise.


Hvolsvelli Webcam Image of Eyjafjallajokull. Freeze frame shows a large plume of ash, steam and gasses ejected from the volcano just after sunrise at 5;16UTC on April 17, 2010. The ash plume seen above dispersed within minutes of appearing, but about 30 seconds and a series of explosions later, a larger plume was spewed out of the volcano’s crater. See the dramatic sequences in the next update.

Click image to enlarge.


Staff from the Icelandic Meteorological Office flew with the Icelandic Coast Guard to the Eyjafjallajökull eruption site on the afternoon of April 16th 2010. At 4 pm the volcanic ash cloud was clearly visible above the cloud deck, rising at times to at least 30,000 feet. Steady winds from the east-north-east moved the cloud away from the volcano. The cloud height was variable from 25 to 30,000 feet and its colour varied from dark to white, depending on how much ash was in the cloud. Credit: Icelandic Met Office.
Image may be subject to copyright.


The Surreality Test. Credit:
Jónas Erlendsson via MBL-Is. Image may be subject to copyright.


The above photo shows the outlet glacier, which is dark at the top due to mud from the flash floods. At the base the glacier flows to the right of a large cracked rock.Credit: Icelandic Met Office. Image may be subject to copyright.  More Photos…


A diagrammatic  illustration of volcanic ash dispersion up to 20,000 ft, issued at 7 pm on 16 April. Advisory charts are issued every six hours, for up to 18 hours ahead, by the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. Source: UK Met Office.


According to the UK Met Office the cloud were moving over northern France and Austria, as well as  eastern and central Russia. © Copyright EUMETSAT/Met Office.

The ash particles range in size from 15 × 20 µm to 70 × 85 µm. (1 µm is a millionth of a meter, or a thousands of a millimeter).


Ash dust particles (at ×400) collected from Aberdeen on the morning of 16 April. These particles are approximately 60 × 70 µm.


Ash dust particles at ×100. Source and Copyright Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

Geoengineer This!

Credit: Golli / Kjartan Þorbjörnsson via MBL-Is. Image may be subject to copyright.

What Happend to Disaster Tourism?

The rascals coiled their tails and ran for the coast. Nearby roads covered in a thick blanket of volcanic ash. Credit: Ómar Óskarsson via MBL-Is. Image may be subject to copyright.

Click link for Eyjafjallajökull Eruption – Satellite Images

The All Important Pronunciation: ‘Aye-ya fyah-tla jow-kutl

Related Links:

Videos

More Photos:

Technical information:

Webcams – Volcanoes in Iceland

Latest Images (RUV): http://www.ruv.is/flokkar/hamfarir

Related Headline News

Related Sites in Iceland (English)

Fire-Earth Links:

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Serial No 1,585. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).

Posted in Eyjafjallajökull, Fimmvörduháls, Iceland volcano, Katla, Laki | Tagged: , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Eyjafjallajökull Eruption – Satellite Images

Posted by feww on April 17, 2010

Ash cloud from Eyjafjallajökull eruption has grounded about 30,000 flights, so far!


Ash from Iceland’s erupting Eyjafjallajökull Volcano had drifted over northern Europe by April 16, 2010. The brown ash is mixed with clouds in this photo-like image taken by MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite at 12:45 p.m. local time (GMT/UTC+2) on April 16,2010. The visible ash sweeps in an arc across the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, and Russia. Additional ash is most probably masked by clouds. Source: NASA. Click image to enlarge.


The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on April 15, 2010. A volcanic plume blows from Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in southern Iceland toward the east-southeast. The plume’s tan hue indicates a high ash content. Volcanic ash consists of tiny jagged particles of rock which can cause engine failure, if sucked into an airplane’s turbines. Source: NASA. Click image to enlarge.

DLR, TerraSAR-X, via Associated Press

A computer enhanced image of  Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland acquired by the TerraSAR-X satellite on April 16, 2010 (late PM).
Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

For the latest Eyjafjallajökull update and links see

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Serial No 1,582. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).

Posted in Eyjafjallajökull, Fimmvörduháls, Iceland volcano, Katla, Laki | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Eyjafjöll Eruption Update – April 3

Posted by feww on April 3, 2010

Serial No  1,532. If any posts are blocked in your country, please drop us a line.

Fimmvörduháls Eruption May be Intensifying – A Second Fissure Has Appeared

A new volcanic fissure has appeared near Eyjafjallajökull in southern Iceland to the northwest of the original fissure on March 31. It may be a sign that the eruption at Fimmvörduháls is intensifying.

A pilot on a sight-seeing flight observed the vent at about 7:00PM  on Wednesday (local time). He saw a sudden flash of light followed  by a new rift, which opened up immediately after, a report said.


The natural-color satellite image (ALI on NASA’s EO-1) above shows a new fissure at Fimmvörduháls near Eyjafjallajökull ejecting steam. The vent, which appeared on March 31, is located  northwest of the original vent. Source: NASA


Map of the Lava flow. Click image to enlarge.
Full map including flow data and legend available at Map of the lava flow from 21 - 31 March 2010 (by Eyjólfur Magnússon, pdf file)

Latest and the most spectacular video of the eruption:

Earlier Videos

Technical information:

Webcams – Volcanoes in Iceland

Latest Images (RUV): http://www.ruv.is/flokkar/hamfarir

Related Headline News

Related Sites in Iceland (English)

Fire-Earth Links:

Posted in Eyjafjallajökull, Eyjafjöll, Fimmvörduháls, Hrunagil canyon, Hvannárgil | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

2010 Year of Super Volcanoes?

Posted by feww on January 30, 2010

Global Volcanism is on the rise!

2010 May Prove to Be Year One of Super Volcanic Activities

Fire-Earth Moderators believe the increase in global volcanism could  include renewed activities at some of the planet’s super volcanoes.

VolcanoWatch Weekly [28 January 2010]

VoW: Volcano Ash Threatens Ecuador’s Ambato City

19 – 26 January 2010 – SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/Unrest

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

MVO reported that during 15-22 January activity from Soufrière Hills consisted of cycles of vigorous ash venting, rockfalls, and pyroclastic flows. On 18 January, a small lava-dome collapse from the W side of the volcano generated a large pyroclastic flow that traveled 4 km and reached the sea.

IG reported that during 20-26 January explosions from Tungurahua were detected by the seismic network. Ashfall was noted almost daily in areas to the SW and sometimes to the W and NW. During 20-23 January lava fountains and explosions ejected incandescent blocks that fell onto and rolled down the flanks.

Ongoing Activity

Barren Island, Andaman Is;  Batu Tara, Komba Island (Indonesia); Chaitén, Southern Chile; Fuego, Guatemala; Gaua, Banks Islands (SW Pacific);  Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka;  Kilauea, Hawaii (USA);  Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Llaima, Central Chile;  Sakura-jima, Kyushu;  Santa María, Guatemala;  Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan).

Related Links:

More Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

VolcanoWatch Weekly [ previous 4 entries ]

Posted in Chaiten, Global Volcanism, Soufrière Hills, Tungurahua, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Mt Mayon Menacingly Mute – Update [3 January 2010]

Posted by feww on January 3, 2010

Will Mayon Erupt Again Soon?

Which scenario will Mayon adopt: Chaitén, Kilauea, Galeras, or one with an entirely different pattern?

What seems highly probable—judging by a number of factors including increased tempo and rhythm of volcanism globally—is that Mayon won’t be in repose for very long.

Mayon activity highlights during  the past 24 hours:

  • Volcano hazard alert down to level 3
  • 9 volcanic earthquakes detected
  • 30 rockfall events
  • No steam emissions
  • Summit crater covered by heavy clouds for most of the 24-hr observation period.
  • Faint glow at the crater occurred
  • Sulfur Dioxide emission rate reported at an average rate of 2,094 tons per day

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 21 released by PHIVOLCS on 3 January 2010

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) seismic monitoring network  detected 9 volcanic earthquakes and 30 rockfall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes during the past 24- hour observation period. Steaming activity was not observed due to thick clouds that covered the summit crater. Pale crater glow was observed last night. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was measured yesterday  morning at an average value of 2,094 tonnes/day.

Alert Level 3 is in effect over Mayon, which means that the 6-km radius Permanent Danger Zone around the volcano and the 7-km Extended Danger Zone on the southeast flank of the volcano should be free from human activity because of sudden explosions that may generate hazardous volcanic flows. People residing close to these danger areas are also advised to observe precautions associated with post-eruption activity, such as rockfalls, pyroclastic flows, and ash fallout which can also occur anytime due to instabilities of lava deposited on steep slopes. Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. Civil aviation authorities must advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejected ash and volcanic fragments from sudden explosions may pose hazards to aircrafts. PHIVOLCS-DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon alert level, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Mayon Volcano Update [2 January 2010]

Posted by feww on January 2, 2010

Philippines experts out of step with Mayon?

Mayon may be gradually returning to the repose period: Phivolcs

The information coming out of PHIVOLCS and the decisions made by the state volcanologists concerning the volcano’s hazard status are at best inconsistent with the history of Mayon’s eruptive activity.

Highlights from the news, eye-witness accounts, official and unofficial reports on Mayon’s status during  the past 24 hours:

  • Phivolcs is lowering Mayon’s alert status from level 4 to level 3 [hazardous explosive eruption less likely]
  • Volcanic quakes down to 13 events (majority of events associated with rockfalls, and rolling  of lava fragments down the mountain)
  • No tephratic eruptions for the 3rd day
  • Sulfur Dioxide emission rate of 2,621 tons per day up (more than twice the amount previous day), but down from a high of about 9,000 tons.
  • Small amount of steam emitted

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 20 released by PHIVOLCS on 2 January 2010

The seismic monitoring network around Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) detected 13 volcanic earthquakes and 68 rockfall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes during the past observation period. Emission of weak volume of white steam at the summit crater was observed during cloud breaks yesterday. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was measured yesterday morning at an average value of 2,621 tonnes/day.

The latest activity of Mayon still indicates that its overall state of unrest remains relatively high.  However, this phase of unrest, characterized by moderate seismicity, high volcanic gas outputs and continuing glow of the summit are processes normally associated with very gradual return to the repose period.  The volcanic system is expected to continue producing earthquakes and to vent a large amount of gases because fresh magma still resides along the whole length of the volcanic pipe and near the summit.

From 28 December to present, a declining trend in Mayon volcano’s activity was noted as reflected by the following observations:

1.      No ash ejections were observed since 29 December. Steam emission was most of the time weak and white in color indicating considerable decrease in energy and absence of ash.

2.      Majority of the type of earthquakes that were recorded during the past days were associated with rockfalls and rolling down of fragments from the lava deposits along Bonga gully and the advancing lava front.

3.      Measured SO2 levels have also showed a decreasing trend from a maximum of 8,993 tons per day to 2,621 tons per day. The still high concentration of SO2 gas emission suggests that there is residual magma degassing at shallow depth.

In view of the above observations, PHIVOLCS-DOST is lowering the alert status of Mayon from Alert Level 4 to Alert Level 3 to reflect the overall gradual decrease of activity. Alert Level 3 means that there is less probability of a hazardous explosive eruption.  However, the lowering of the alert level from 4 to 3 should not be interpreted that the unrest of the volcano has ceased. If there is resurgence in the volcano’s activity and the potential for explosive eruptions is perceived to be forthcoming, the alert level may be raised back to 4 but if there is noticeable downward trend in the monitored parameters, then the alert will be further lowered to Alert Level 2.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon Hazard level, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mayon Volcano Update [1 January 2010]

Posted by feww on January 1, 2010

Could Blue Moon Trigger Mayon Explosion?

State vulcanologists believe full moon could trigger Mayon explosion

Resident volcanologists at Phivolcs said a major eruption could occur based on the volcano’s behavior and the the full moon working as triggering mechanism to cause the restive volcano to explode.

According to their theory,  the gravitational pull of the full moon as it gets closer to Earth could cause a large increase in the rate of ascent of magma up and out of the volcano.


The Moon glows by light it reflects from the Sun and is frequently the brightest object in the night sky. The Moon orbits the Earth about once a month (moon-th) from about 1 light second away. The above-pictured Full Moon occurs when the Moon is nearly opposite to the Sun in its orbit.   Credit: Lick Observatory.

How They Paint the Moon Blue

Most years have twelve full moons occurring monthly; however, each solar calendar year has an additional eleven days compared with the lunar year. The extra days add up to a 13th full moon called a “blue moon” about 7 times in the 19-year Metonic cycle, which translates into one blue moon every two or three years.

Other highlights from the news, eye-witness accounts, official and unofficial reports on Mayon’s status during  the past 24 hours:

  • 28 volcanic earthquakes recorded
  • 91 rockfall events
  • Some steam emitted
  • Lava still flowing
  • SO2 emissions down to daily average of 1,255 tons
  • Phivolcs may lower alert level from 4 to 3, if no significant events occur in the next few days

Human Angle:

  • A power blackout was enforced in the danger zone around Mt Mayon on Thursday, to discourage residents from returning to their homes.
  • The water supply is due to be turned off Friday, as state volcanologists warned that the full moon  could trigger a major explosion today.
  • A military spokesman said many residents were using  “backdoor” routes to return to their homes for the New Year’s festivities.
  • About two dozen tourists were reportedly arrested as they entered the danger zone.
  • Local police and military have been ordered to carry out house-to-house searches and arrest any residents that might still be in the danger zone.
  • Aid organizations are plan to evacuate about 4,000 animals to areas outside Mayon danger zone, ABC said.

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 19 released by PHIVOLCS on 1 January 2010

The seismic monitoring network around the volcano detected 28 volcanic earthquakes and 91 rockfall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes during the past 24-hour observation period. No ash explosion was observed. Weak to moderate emission of white steam at the summit crater was seen during cloud breaks from 7:29 AM – 8:30 AM and from 5:25 PM to 5:40 PM yesterday. Flowing lava and intermittent rolling incandescent lava fragments were observed last night. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was measured at an average of 1,255 tons/day.

Alert Level 4 is still being maintained but if no significant events should occur during the next few days, PHIVOLCS-DOST shall consider the possibility of lowering down the alert level from 4 to 3. PHIVOLCS-DOST still strongly reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity. Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. In addition, Civil Aviation Authorities must advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejected ash and volcanic fragments from sudden explosions may pose hazards to aircrafts. PHIVOLCS-DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Mayon Volcano Update [31 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 31, 2009

Mayon Pipes Down, for Now

The Contrast: “Disaster Tourism” Booms as Boredom Sets in Among the Evacuees!


Lava flow from the crater of Mayon volcano as viewed from Lignon Hill in Legazpi city, Albay province, December 30, 2009. Credit: Bullit Marquez/ AP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Highlights of news, observations, official and unofficial reports:

  • Thick clouds covered the volcano summit affecting visibility
  • No ash explosion during times of good visibility
  • Steam and ash spewed from volcano
  • 60 volcanic earthquakes recorded
  • 267 rock fall events reported
  • SO2 emissions rate down to 1,158 tonnes per day
  • volcano edifice remains inflated
  • Volcano hazard alert remained at Level 4 (explosive eruption could be imminent)

Other Headlines:

  • Seismic activity increasing in Mindanao, Philippines, with several several quakes measuring 5.0 to 5.7Mw reported in the region.
  • At least two quakes measuring 5.2 and 5.6 Mw struck near Leyte, Philippines in the past 24 hrs.

Human Angle:

Albay Governor Joey Salceda ordered the electricity and water supplies to be cit off to properties within the extended and permanent danger zones near Mayon Volcano yesterday, the Manila Bulletin reported.

Salceda said he wanted to discourage people from entering their homes withing the danger zone, after reports that many evacuees had returned to their homes for the New Year.

“Legally, there should be no people within the declared danger zones because of the provincial ordinance of the implementation of a 24-hour curfew. It is on this premise that I ordered that electricity and water supplies should be cut off,” he added.

“By Thursday afternoon (December 31), Salceda said he is also expecting the security forces to cut off the roads leading to all affected barangays in the cities of Tabaco, Legazpi and Ligao and the towns of Guinobatan, Camalig, Daraga, Malilipot and Sto. Domingo.” Manila Bulletin reported

“All the hotels are fully booked, even the cheapest ones,” Salceda told reporters.

The Contrast: “Disaster Tourism” Booms as Boredom Sets in Among the Evacuees!


As the hotels in the Albay Province are filled to capacity with overenthusiastic, “disaster tourism” visitors, boredom sets in among the evacuees. AP Photo/Mike Alquinto. Image may be subject to copyright.

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 18 released on 31 December 2009

For the past 24 hours, Mayon Volcano’s (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) activity was characterized by extrusion of lava and rolling down of incandescent lava fragments along the Bonga gully. The summit of the volcano was obscured most of the time yesterday due to thick cloud cover. No ash explosion was observed during times of good visibility. Emission of very weak to moderate volume of white steam that drifted towards west- southwest was observed during clear views of the crater.

Seismic monitoring revealed the occurrence of 60 volcanic earthquakes. A total of 267 rock fall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes was also detected by the seismic network. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate measurements yesterday yielded an average value of 1,158 tonnes per day (t/d). The volcano edifice remains inflated as indicated by the electronic tilt meter installed at the northeast sector of the volcano.

The status of Mayon Volcano is maintained at Alert Level 4.  PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. In addition, Civil Aviation Authorities must advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejected ash and volcanic fragments from sudden explosions may pose hazards to aircrafts. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mayon Volcano Update [30 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 30, 2009

Mayon Calmer, But it Could Be the Lull Before the Storm

It would be very helpful if PHIVOLCS released more detailed information on Mayon status!

Highlights of news, observations, official and unofficial reports:

  • Minor ash explosions down to one
  • Tephra ejected to a height of 100 meters above the summit
  • Continuous lava flow down Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies
  • Lava front traveled an additional 100 meters to a distance of 5.9 km from th esummit
  • 16 volcanic earthquakes recorded
  • 150 rockfall events caused by lava fragments detaching from the upper slopes
  • SO2 emission rate of 4,397 tons per day almost a third higher than the previous day
  • The edifice remains inflated

The Human Angle

  • About 50,000 people are still crammed in 29  evacuation centers in the country’s eastern province of Albay.
  • Local schools are doubling as makeshift evacuation centers.
  • The evacuees may have to spend several months in the centers.
  • But schools are supposed to open after New Year holidays.
  • Water and sanitation facilities are in critically short supply, UNICEF said.
  • Evacuees have been advised to protect their children from Mayon’s fine ash, because it could worsen asthma, bronchitis and respiratory-related illnesses; however, face masks are reportedly in short supply.
  • At least four people have died in the evacuation centers so far. A 3-year-old from an unspecified infection and three elderly people from heart attacks, health officials have revealed.
  • Crowding and cramp conditions have already led to widespread skin diseases and respiratory illnesses throughout the 29 shelters.
  • Food isn’t in short supply, but there’s a shortage of items such as nappies for babies and sanitary towels for women, according to a local news bulletin.
  • “The evacuees face the grim prospect of being away from home for several more weeks—local disaster officials said the worst case is six more months since Mayon Volcano remains under Alert Level 4 indicating imminent eruption.” The report said.
  • An elected official of Legazpi City, Councilor Celoy Chan, has been “renting his All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) to foreign tourists [in direct contravention of the emergency laws] and even escorting them for a trip right near the lava front of the Mayon volcano.” A news report said.
  • Evacuees in Legazpi City and Tabaco City shelters are being “shortchanged.” That is, they are only receiving half the amount of relief goods, especially rice, allocated to them.  Every family is allocated 5 kilograms of rice daily but they only receive 2 ½  to 3kgs, according to another report.
  • Province of Albay officials say about 2,500 tourists per day are flocking into the region to see Mayon activity, a rise of about 15 folds since the volcano became restive on December 14.

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 17 released on 30 December 2009

For the past 24 hours, one ash explosion occurred at Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E). The explosion produced a dirty white ash column that rose to about 100 meters above the summit and drifted to the northwest. Lava continued to flow down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies. The lava front has now reached about 5.9 kilometers from the summit along the Bonga-Buyuan gully.

Mayon Volcano’s seismic network recorded 16 volcanic earthquakes. A total of 150 rock fall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes was also detected by the seismic network. Yesterday’s measurement of Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) rate yielded an average value of 4,397 tonnes per day (t/d). The volcano edifice remains inflated as indicated by the electronic tilt meter installed at the northeast sector of the volcano.

The status of Mayon Volcano is maintained at Alert Level 4.  PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. In addition, Civil Aviation Authorities must advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejected ash and volcanic fragments from sudden explosions may pose hazards to aircrafts. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mayon Volcano Update [29 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 29, 2009

The Raging Lava Mill

Mayon Continues to Spew Lava and Eject Tephra


Lave spews out of Mt Mayon. Dated 27 December 27, 2009.
Credit: Erik de Castro, Reuters. Image may be subject to copyright.

Highlights of news, observations, official and unofficial reports:

  • 9 minor explosions during the past 24-hr observation period
  • Explosions ejected tephra to a height of 2km above the summit
  • Seismic activity high with 38 tremors recorded
  • 171 incidents of rock fall reported as lava fragments detached from Mayon’s upper slopes
  • Sulfur dioxide emission rate at 3,416 ton, almost unchanged from the previous day
  • Fresh lava flowed along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies
  • Lava advanced by an additional 100 meters to 5.8km from the summit crater
  • Officials have declared the area a no-fly zone
  • Tourists are strictly prohibited from entering the danger zone
  • Pilots are advised to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit to prevent probable damage to aircraft caused by the ejected tephra.

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 16 released on 29 December 2009

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to be restive and exhibited 9 ash explosions during the past 24 hours. The explosions produced dirty white to light brown ash columns that rose to a maximum height of about 2000 meters above the summit before drifting towards the west and southwest.

Seismic activity remained at high level as a total of 38 volcanic earthquakes and 171 rock fall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes was detected by the seismic network. Measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rate conducted yesterday yielded an average value of 3,416 tonnes per day (t/d).

Red hot lava continued to flow down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies. At present, the lava front at Buyuan channel is approximately 5.8 kilometers downslope from the summit crater. From time to time, rolling down of incandescent lava fragments coming from the crater was observed.

The status of Mayon Volcano is maintained at Alert Level 4.  PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. In addition, Civil Aviation Authorities must advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejected ash and volcanic fragments from sudden explosions may pose hazards to aircrafts. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:


Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon SO2, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mayon Volcano Update [28 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 28, 2009

Mayon activity remains intense


Clouds partially cover Mayon volcano, as it ejects tephra in Legazpi City, Albay province December 28, 2009. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo). Image may be subject to copyright.

Highlights of news, observations, official and unofficial reports:

  • Mayon activity remains intense
  • The lava flowed about 5.7 km from the summit crater, nearing  coconut plantations in the area
  • 7 tephra explosions
  • Tephra ejected to a height of about 2km above the summit
  • 44 volcanic earthquakes
  • 137 rock fall events
  • Fresh lava continues to flow down the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies.
  • Sulfur dioxide emission rate reached 4,329 ton per day almost double the amount previous day.
  • Volcanic Hazard warning remains at level 4, which means an explosive eruption could occur anytime.
  • About 50,000 people are staying at 30 evacuation centers.
  • The authorities said they were setting  up an epidemiology surveillance unit at the provincial health headquarters.
  • Local government said it discouraged “disaster tourism” in the light of tourists from the US, Europe and Asia flocking to the Albay province where Mt Mayon is located.
  • A group of tourists who tried to venture into the 8-kilometer danger zone were ejected by the military at one of the nine checkpoints set up within the area.

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 15 released on 28 December 2009

For the past 24 hours, Mayon Volcano’s (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) intense level of unrest persisted. Seven ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. The explosions produced dirty white to light gray ash columns that rose to a maximum height of about 2000 meters above the summit before drifting towards the southwest.

A total of 44 volcanic earthquakes and 137 rock fall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes was detected by the seismic network. Red hot lava continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies. Intermittent rolling of incandescent lava fragments were also observed. Yesterday’s measurement of

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano.  PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:


Posted in Mayon activity, Mayon Volcano, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes, SO2 emissions at mayon | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mayon Volcano UPDATE: 27 Dec 09

Posted by feww on December 27, 2009

20 million m³ of lava spewed since Dec 14

Mayon edifice remains inflated despite voluminous lava extrusion

Highlights of news, observations, official and unofficial reports:

  • Renewed high level of activity in the past 24 hrs
  • At least 9 tephra explosions
  • Tephra (ash, lapilli and volcanic bombs) ejected to maximum height of about 1 km above the summit
  • 44 volcanic earthquakes
  • 297 rock fall events
  • 20 million m³ of lava extruded since Dec 14 [Unofficial figure]
  • Edifice remained inflated despite voluminous lava flow during the past two weeks
  • SO2 average daily emissions down to 2,304 tons per day due to brief clogging the previous day
  • Water-rationing regime has begun at the makeshift evacuation centers (mostly local school classrooms)

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 14 released on 27 December 2009

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to exhibit a high level of activity during the past 24-hours observation period. Nine ash explosions accompanied by rumbling sounds were observed during times of good visibility, seven of which occurred from 4:20 AM to 5:49AM today. The explosions produced dirty white to brownish ash columns with lava fragments that reached heights from 800 to 1000 meters above the summit.

The seismic network detected 44 volcanic earthquakes and 297 rock fall events related to the detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes. Flowing red hot lava and rolling incandescent lava fragments temporarily slowed down after the 10:52 A.M. explosion earthquake yesterday and resumed early morning today after the 4:20 A.M. ash explosion. The apparent brief lull was also reflective of the decrease in the sulfur dioxide emission rate from the previous 8,993 tonnes per day to yesterday’s measurement of 2,304 tonnes per day.

Electronic tilt meter measurements at the northwest slope of Mayon Volcano (elevation 800m ASL), indicate that the edifice remained inflated despite the high volume of lava extruded since the start of the eruption on December 14, 2009.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see links below:

Related Links:

Posted in Mayon activity, mayon edifice, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes, SO2 emissions at mayon | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Mayon Volcano Update [26 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 26, 2009

Explosive Eruption at Mayon Almost a Certainty: FEWW

  • Mayon in “high level of unrest”

  • Volcano’s daily SO2 emissions reach 9,000MT

“Mayon volcano is still in a high state of unrest and in the coming days it could still have an explosive eruption. If we look at the volcano’s history in 1984, the volcano calmed down but after a few days it erupted. ” —Ed Laguerta, resident volcanologist the Lignon Hill Observatory

“The number of  quakes have lessened but now the quakes are of a different variety. What is becoming clear is that [Mayon] is getting clogged. That is when the lava is rising but cannot get out,” he added.

“The edifice looks inflated so we cannot say that the actual activity of Mayon has decreased.”

During the past 24-hr observation period, the state vulcanologists recorded:

  • Mt Mayon is clogged up. [Latest Information]
  • The edifice seems inflated. [Latest Information]
  • High levels of activity continued during the past 24-hours.
  • Volcano hazard warning stayed at stayed at level 4 which indicates a hazardous eruption could occur anytime.
  • 33 explosions ejected off-white ash to heights of about 1km above the summit (observations subject to visibility)
  • 26 rumbling sounds and 2 loud hisses detected at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City
  • Elevated seismic activity produced 406 volcanic earthquakes.
  • 142 rock fall events caused by detachment of lava fragments occurred near  the upper slopes.
  • Fresh lava and rolling incandescent lava fragments continuously flowed at Bonga, Padang and Miisi gullie.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate for the report period reached a daily average of 8,993 MT. [HIGHEST amount reported since latest episode began.]

FEWW Comment: The latest information suggest an increase in the probability of [almost guaranteeing] explosive eruption(s) occurring at Mt Mayon.

For FEWW Earlier Forecast see: 76% chance Mayon explodes before 2010

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 13 released on 26 December 2009

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to exhibit a high level of activity during the past 24-hour observation period. Thirty three (33) ash explosions with dirty white to brownish ash columns that reached maximum heights of 1,000 m above the summit were observed during times of good visibility. Twenty six (26) rumbling and two (2) hissing sounds from the volcano were heard at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City. Seismic activity remained elevated as the seismic network recorded a total of four hundred six (406) volcanic earthquakes. One hundred forty two (142) rock fall events related to detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes were also detected. Flowing red hot lava and rolling incandescent lava fragments were continuously observed at Bonga, Padang and Miisi gullies. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate remained high and was measured at an average of 8,993 tonnes per day (t/d) yesterday.

Alert Level 4 is hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

Mayon Volcano Update [25 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 25, 2009

Mayon Volcano Activity: Intense

Mayon Volcano activity remains at high levels of intensity


Mayon Volcano spews ash as glowing lava cascades down its slope during a mild eruption, December 24, 2009.  Credit: REUTERS/Erik de Castro. Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

During the past 24-hr observation period, the state vulcanologists observed and recorded:

  • 96 ash explosions when visibility permitted.
  • Columns of “light brown to grayish” ash ejected to a height of  2 km.
  • 125  booming and rumbling sounds detected at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City.
  • Elevated seismic activity.
  • 871 volcanic earthquakes.
  • 98 rock fall events, “related to detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes.”
  • Pyroclastic flows moved down within 2 km from the crater.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission averaged at 2,738 tonnes/day.
  • Volcano hazard warning remains at alert level 4.

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 12  released on 25 December 2009

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to show an intense level of activity during the past 24-hour observation period. Ninety-six (96) ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced light brown to grayish ash columns that reached heights of up to 2 km. One hundred twenty five (125) rumbling and booming sounds from the volcano were heard at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City. Seismic activity remained elevated as the seismic network recorded a total of eight hundred seventy one (871) volcanic earthquakes. Ninety eight (98) rock fall events, related to detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes, were also detected. Three of these events were observed to have generated pyroclastic flows that moved down within 2 km from the crater. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was high and was measured at an average of 2,738 tonnes/day yesterday.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

Mayon Volcano Update 24 December 2009

Posted by feww on December 24, 2009

Mayon lava fountains shoot up to 500m

Mt Mayon’s Unrest Continues at High Levels of Intensity


Mayon Volcano in Legazpi city shoots up a column of ash into air during a small explosion December 24, 2009. The Philippines’ most active volcano could erupt explosively anytime. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo). Image may be subject to copyright.

State Vulcanologists record 815 volcanic earthquakes and harmonic tremors, many at maximum deflection.

  • Mayon lava fountains shoot up to 500m.
  • Mt Mayon unrest continues at high levels of intensity.
  • Incandescent lava fragments were ejected during several explosions which occurred last night.
  • 20 Ash explosions, observed when visibility was good, ejected columns of “grayish to light brown” ash up to 1500 meters into air.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emissions  remained high at an average daily rate of about 5,737 metric tons, yesterday.
  • 124 booming and rumbling sounds were heard throughout the past 24 hours.

The following Bulletin by Phivolcs was released today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 11  released on 24 December 2009

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) intense level of unrest continued to persist during the past observation period.  Seismic activity remained elevated in number and size as the seismic network detected 815 volcanic earthquakes and harmonic tremors. Many of these volcanic earthquakes were recorded at maximum deflection. Twenty (20) ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced grayish to light brown ash columns that reached height from 100 to 1500 meters above the summit before drifting towards the southwest by the prevailing northeast monsoon. Lava fountaining was observed at 2312 PM, 2314 PM, 2320 PM and 2332 PM with maximum height of 500 meters above the crater. Several explosions with ejected incandescent lava fragments were noted during night observations.

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate remained high and was measured at an average of 5,737 tons per day (t/d) yesterday. One hundred twenty four (124) audible booming and rumbling sounds were intermittently heard for the past 24 hours.  Red hot lava also continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

Mayon Volcano Update 23 December

Posted by feww on December 23, 2009

Mayon Volcano Undergoing Strombolian Phase

Mt Mayon is believed to be in a strombolian phase (often occurs before a major eruption), say state vulcanologists.

  • Lava flow has reached 5.5 km from the summit.
  • There may be a series of eruptions instead of a single catastrophic explosion.
  • Magma movement continues to generate continuous tremors.
  • Albay residents who refuse to leave their properties may have to sign a waiver.

The following bulletin was issued by PHIVOLCS:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 10
23 December 2009 – 7:00 AM [UTC + 8hrs]

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to show an intense level of activity during the past 24-hour observation period. Seismic activity remained elevated in number and size as the seismic network detected 1,051 volcanic earthquakes and continuously recorded harmonic tremors. Many of these volcanic earthquakes were recorded at maximum deflection. Sixty six (66) ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced grayish to light brown ash columns that reached height from 100 to 1000 meters above the summit before drifting towards southwest.

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate remained very high and was measured at an average of 6,737 tons per day (t/d) yesterday. Two hundred eighty (280) audible booming and rumbling sounds were intermittently heard for the past 24 hours.  Red hot lava also continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

Mayon Volcano (13.2576ºN, 123.6856ºE)

Mt Mayon Eruption: The Human Angle


Filipino children living near the foot of Mt Mayon pray before being evacuated, as an imminent eruption looms. Photo; AFP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Previously:

Mayon Alert Raised to Level 4 and 76% chance Mayon explodes before 2010

Mayon Volcano Update from Phivolcs Bulletin 9 – Issued 22 December 2009 7:00 AM Local Time

  • Intense level of activity detected during the past 24-hour observation period
  • A total of 1,266 volcanic earthquakes were recorded with seismic activity remaining elevated both in frequency and amplitude.
  • “Many of these volcanic earthquakes were recorded at maximum deflection and have continuously occurred since 12:21 PM, 20 December 2009.  Harmonic tremors were still continuously being recorded.” Phivolcs reported.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate averaged at about 6,529 tons per day (t/d).
  • State vulcanologists were unable to make visual observations due to theavy  clouds that shrouded the upper and middle slopes of mayon for most of the last 25 hours.
  • “However, an intensified crater glow was observed during a short cloud break last night. Audible booming and rumbling sounds were still intermittently heard for the past 24 hours. Red hot lava also continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies. The lava front has reached about 5 kilometers downslope from the summit along the Bonga-Buyuan gully.”

Other remarks:

“Alert Level 4 is hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days. Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity. Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify. Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.”

Other Reports

As the volcano continued to eject ash into the air early Tuesday morning, eye-witness reports said ashfall had covered parts of three towns in Albay province: Guinobatan, Camalig and Polangui towns in the Mayon’s southern sector.

Some of the residents in the area have been issued with face masks, others including the residents in Daep have been told to cover their faces with handkerchiefs, or pieces of cloth.

Mayon Update [21 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 21, 2009

Mayon Volcano on Fire

The Final Countdown May Have Begun


Lava cascades down the slopes of Mayon volcano Sunday Dec. 20, 2009 in Legazpi city, Albay province, about 500 kilometers southeast of Manila, Philippines. Tens of thousands residents living around the slopes of Mayon are now housed in evacuation centers and most likely will spend Christmas away from their homes as the country’s most active volcano became restive a week ago. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez). Image may be subject to copyright.

Previously:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 8 Issued by Phivolcs

Date: 21 December 2009  at 7:00AM Local Time [20-12-09 at 23:00UTC]

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) activity escalated during the past 24-hour observation period. Seismic activity dramatically increased in number and size. A total of 1,942 volcanic earthquakes was detected by the seismic network. Many of these volcanic earthquakes were recorded at maximum deflection and continually occurred beginning at 1221H yesterday. Harmonic tremors were also continuously recorded.

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate remained very high at 6,089 tonnes per day (t/d). Audible booming and rumbling sounds were first reported in the eastern flank of the volcano at about 1455H then occasionally occurred beginning 2200H last night. Intensified crater glow and rolling down of incandescent lava fragments from the crater was also persistent. Red hot lava also continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies. Lava fountains rising approximately 200 meters above the crater were observed at 2007H, 2008H and 2018H. The lava front has now reached about 5 kilometers downslope from the summit along the Bonga-Buyuan gullies.

Alert Level 4 is hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days. Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8 km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7 km on the northern sector be strictly observed. Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify. Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

.

Mayon Alert Raised to Level 4

Posted by feww on December 20, 2009

Mayon Major Eruption Expected Within Days

Fire Earth Forecast: 76% chance Mayon explodes before 2010

State volcanologist in the Philippines raised the Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) alert status  to level on Sunday at 14:30 local time, which means they expect a major eruption within days.

PHIVOLCS reported Sunday that the advancing lava flow had traveled about 4.5 kilometers from the crater along Bonga-Buyuan Gully. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission had increased from 2,034 MT per day (t/d) to 7,024 t/d.

Their seismic network had recorded a total of two hundred twenty two (222) volcanic quakes and tremors in the previous 24 hours, they said.

According to other reports rumbling sounds were heard in Santa Misericordia village near Santo Domingo town, about 8.5 km to the east of Mt Mayon.

.

76% chance Mayon explodes before 2010

Posted by feww on December 19, 2009

MAYON MAY EXPLODE BY YEAREND: FEWW

More than 250 tremors recorded at Mt Mayon, a sign that the volcano may be about to explode.

About 4 dozen minor explosions have occurred at the volcano, accompanied by off-white columns of smoke, gasses and ash that were ejected to a height of about 1,000 meters  above the summit,  according to the Phivolcs’ latest bulletin.

Below are some of the highlights of latest reports on Mayon:

  • Mayon’s activity has intensified since Friday.
  • Emissions of sulfur dioxide have exceeded 2,000 tons per day.
  • The lava flow has reached about 4 km from the summit crater along the Bonga Gully, generating secondary pyroclastic flows.
  • As the buildup of new lava on the cone continues to increase, the additional weight would cause the edifice to collapse, while the buildup of pressure inside the volcano would most probably result in a major  explosion.
  • Based on the the available evidence, Fire Earth Moderators believe there’s a 76 percent  chance  that Mt Mayon could explode before the year’s end.
  • If the volcano explodes, more lava would flow out of the crater.
  • Phivolcs officials are contemplating on raising the alert level at Mayon Volcano to  Level 4, which would indicate “hazardous volcanic eruption” is imminent.
  • Albay Public Safety and Emergency Management officials said more than 40,000 people or about 8,500 families from 30 villages had already been evacuated to 24 temporary shelters by noon Saturday.

The regional govt in Albay may evacuate an additional 70,000 villagers, in case heavy rains in the area threaten a repeat  2006 nightmare  in which more than 1,000 perished after typhoon Durian triggered mudslides of volcanic ash on November 30, which buried  several villages near the foot of the mountain.

Many of the villagers who have been evacuated reportedly sneak back into their villages to look after their animals and ready-to-harvest seasonal crops.

.

Volcano UPDATE: Mt Mayon Could Explode

Posted by feww on December 17, 2009

Mayon: What might happen next

After an explosive eruption, the “perfect cone” could disappear partially or altogether

A major hazardous eruption could lead to large explosions destroying Mt Mayon. The erupting volcano could empty its magma chamber causing the much-admired “perfect cone” edifice to collapse into its depleted reservoir, and forming a caldera.


BEFORE: Mayon volcano,  located in a coconut-growing region of the central Philippines, is famed for its near-perfect cone shape. Mt Mayon. Credit: Lozaphilippines. Image may be subject to copyright.


AFTER: If Mt Mayon edifice collapses into the magma chamber, the after image may look like the above. [The snow cover is less likely right now.] Photo shows Aniakchak Caldera in the Aleutian Range, Alaska. This 10 km diameter caldera formed about 3,450 years ago. Many smaller cinder cones have formed within the caldera. Credit: USGS

Mayon UPDATE:

As Mayon Volcano continued to eject 500-m plumes of ash into air, spewing lava down its slopes for a third day, and burning rocks, mud and everything else in its path, PHIVOLCS vulcanologists said they expected a major explosive eruption soon.

Up to 50,000 people have been or are about to be evacuated from Mayon’s danger zones and neighboring areas, Philippines Defense Secretary said in a news conference.

Many villagers are reluctant to live because its seasonal harvest time for their crops. They are staying put despite th eregional government threat of martial law.

PHIVOLCS, whose computer network is off the internet when there’s a crisis, as is the case right now,  was reported ass saying it had recorded at least five minor explosions at the volcano on Wednesday, and 80 “high frequency quakes” in the last 24 hours.

.

Mayon Lava in Interesting Times!

Posted by feww on December 16, 2009

Mayon Lava Flow Grows

Mayon at a ‘high level of unrest’ may experience  more dangerous explosions


Mt Mayon Spews Lava.
Photo: Reuters. Image may be subject to copyright.

Mayon 5-level hazard alert raised to level 3 Tuesday after Mayon ejected ash and spewed lava.

According to Phivolcs, “Alert level 3 condition signifies magma is near the top of the crater and incandescent materials are now detaching. Mayon volcano is now at a ‘high level of unrest’ and may have more dangerous explosions.”

Quick fact about the latest episode of activity at Mt Mayon:

  • Phivolcs Level 3 alert means an eruption is expected within days to weeks [Level 4 means an eruption is imminent, while level 5 means eruption is in progress.]
  • Albay Governor Jose Salceda has declared “a state of imminent disaster” throughout the province, to allow the provincial government to access disaster funds needed to evacuate residents in Mayon’s danger zones.
  • Phivolcs scientist, Alex Baloloy,  said, “a full blown eruption is expected to take place within weeks to days.”
  • Baloloy said lava had cascaded down about 3 km from the crater summit of the volcano.
  • By Monday Mayon had emitted about 800 tons of Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas.
  • The air in the region has been described as “hot and irritable” and “smelly.”
  • After 23 volcanic quakes on Monday, 5 ash explosions occurred at the volcano generating a mix of brownish and grayish ash cloud.
  • Phivolcs said it had recorded 78 volcanic earthquakes in the last 24 hours
  • Philippines disaster management officials have now evacuated about 50,000 people from Tabaco City and the towns of Malipot, Daraga, Camalig, Guinobatan and Ligao near Mt Mayon, aiming for a “zero-casualty situation.”
  • Schoolrooms within an 8-km radius of Mt Mayon have been suspended and used as evacuation shelters. [Let's hope the schools are better built in the Philippines than they are in China.]
  • Mayon has experienced more than 50 eruption in 400 years.
  • The first recorded major eruption occurred in 1616.
  • The most voluminous lava flow occurred in the 1766 eruption.
  • Mayon’s most destructive eruption occurred on February 1, 1814. The volcano bombarded the town of Cagsa with tephra, burying all but the bell tower of the town’s church in about 9 m of ash. As many as 2,300 of Albay residents may have perished in the volcano’s deadliest eruption to date.
  • Mayon erupted continuously for 7 days starting June 23, 1897. The village of Bacacay was buried in 15 m of lava. About 500 villagers were killed in the aftermath.

Fire Earth Moderators believe more volcanic activities at other Philippines volcanoes are highly probable in the near future. The volcanoes located on the island on Mindanao are particularly liable to erupt in the next 12 to 36 months.

The moderators also believe a large eruption may occur at Taal volcano. For other related forecast, see links below and search blog contents.

.

Mayon Volcano Oozes Lava

Posted by feww on December 15, 2009

Mayon, Philippines most active volcano, oozes lava and ejects plumes of ash into the air

The Philippines Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, PHIVOLCS, raised the five-step alert to 3 after increased activity at Mayon volcano.

The authorities have evacuated thousands of residents from the 6-km (4 miles) permanent danger zone, which is now declared a prohibited area.

About 50,000 people live in an 8km (5 mile) radius of the mountain.


Lava cascades down the slopes of Mayon volcano in Legazpi city, Albay province, Monday Dec. 14, 2009.  (AP Photo/Nelson Salting). Image may be subject to copyright.


About 30,000 people were evacuated from the foot of Mt Mayon after the volcano spewed ash and lava in Albay province, the Philippines.  Photo:AFP. Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

Magma had been steadily rising at Mayon since late November and finally oozed out of the crater late Monday, and the activity at the volcano is expected to intensify, said PHILVOC.

If magma continues to push up the crater at a steady rate there would be lava flows, and “the possibility of an explosion.” PHILVOC reported.


Major Volcanoes of the Philippines Location Map. Click image to enlarge.

The 2467-meter Mayon Volcano is a stratovolcano [it is renowned for its almost perfectly conical shape] islocated about 15 kilometres northwest of Legazpi City [about 500 kilometers south of the capital, Manila,] in the province of Albay, Bicol Region, on the island of Luzon, in the Philippines.

Mayon is one of the 22 or so active volcanoes in the Philippines, and has caused the deaths of thousands of people and devastated several towns and villages in three major eruptions since its 1814. In 2006, after several eruptions, typhoon Durian triggered mudslides of volcanic ash on November 30, which buried  several villages near the foot of the mountain, killing about 1,000 people.

Fire Earth Moderators believe more volcanic activities at other Philippines volcanoes are highly probable in the near future. The volcanoes located on the island on Mindanao are particularly liable to erupt in the next 12 to 36 months.

The moderators also believe a large eruption may occur at Taal volcano. For other related forecast, see links below and search blog contents.

Related Links:

Posted in edifice inflated, Mt Mayon, Philippines volcanoes, SO2 emissions at mayon, volcanic activity | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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