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Swine Flu Pandemic: Pharmaceuticals Payday

Posted by feww on June 11, 2009

WHO’s done it: Swine flu scam enters $600 billion phase!

Responding to pharmaceuticals business emergency, WHO ‘phinally’ declares swine flu ‘phandemic’

Here are some of the issues to consider:

1. Swine flu is a ‘phandemic’; it’s a ‘pandemic’  created by the World Health Organization (WHO), for pharmaceuticals. [See background, and scam  details.]

2. The recent influenza A(H1N1) viral mutation was most likely laboratory-engineered by/ for the multinational pharmaceuticals.

3. Flu viruses, laboratory-engineered or not, are pharmaceuticals’ ‘backbone’ business, especially when they’re elevated into a “pandemic.” They’re exploited as global, wholesale, long-term lucrative trade prospects. As WHO’s top flu expert Keiji Fukuda said: “When you’re talking about pandemic influenza, you are talking about a marathon, you are not talking about a sprint.”

4. The “flu experts” on whose advice the WHO supposedly acts, are pals of the same order eating from the same trough. If there are any ‘independent’ experts anywhere in the world, and don’t bet your life on finding one, they could only arrive at the same [desired] conclusion concerning a ‘pandemic’ because they’d be looking at the same set of flu data provided by the WHO.

5. To keep all other conditions normal, preventing  any  animosity/ rivalry between the pharmaceuticals and the other industries over potential loss of trade opportunities, and no doubt “acting on the recommendation of flu experts,”  the WHO has again advised its 193 member countries “not to close borders or impose travel restrictions to halt the movement of people, goods and services,” a call which has been approved and “echoed by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

6. The languishing pharmaceuticals are not immune to the impacts of global economic slowdown. [Though they are clearly more enterprising than other industries, and can bank on the WHO to bail them out every time!]

7. When asked, Dr Thomas Frieden, new director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told a news conference: “This is not a surprise… It is expected based on the data.”

World now at the start of 2009 influenza pandemic – WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan

Her full statement to the press:

Dr Margaret Chan – Director-General of the World Health Organization

Ladies and gentlemen,

In late April, WHO announced the emergence of a novel influenza A virus.

This particular H1N1 strain has not circulated previously in humans. The virus is entirely new.

The virus is contagious, spreading easily from one person to another, and from one country to another. As of today, nearly 30,000 confirmed cases have been reported in 74 countries.

This is only part of the picture. With few exceptions, countries with large numbers of cases are those with good surveillance and testing procedures in place.

Spread in several countries can no longer be traced to clearly-defined chains of human-to-human transmission. Further spread is considered inevitable.

I have conferred with leading influenza experts, virologists, and public health officials. In line with procedures set out in the International Health Regulations, I have sought guidance and advice from an Emergency Committee established for this purpose.

On the basis of available evidence, and these expert assessments of the evidence, the scientific criteria for an influenza pandemic have been met.

I have therefore decided to raise the level of influenza pandemic alert from phase 5 to phase 6.

The world is now at the start of the 2009 influenza pandemic.

We are in the earliest days of the pandemic. The virus is spreading under a close and careful watch.

No previous pandemic has been detected so early or watched so closely, in real-time, right at the very beginning. The world can now reap the benefits of investments, over the last five years, in pandemic preparedness.

We have a head start. This places us in a strong position. But it also creates a demand for advice and reassurance in the midst of limited data and considerable scientific uncertainty.

Thanks to close monitoring, thorough investigations, and frank reporting from countries, we have some early snapshots depicting spread of the virus and the range of illness it can cause.

We know, too, that this early, patchy picture can change very quickly. The virus writes the rules and this one, like all influenza viruses, can change the rules, without rhyme or reason, at any time.

Globally, we have good reason to believe that this pandemic, at least in its early days, will be of moderate severity. As we know from experience, severity can vary, depending on many factors, from one country to another.

On present evidence, the overwhelming majority of patients experience mild symptoms and make a rapid and full recovery, often in the absence of any form of medical treatment.

Worldwide, the number of deaths is small. Each and every one of these deaths is tragic, and we have to brace ourselves to see more. However, we do not expect to see a sudden and dramatic jump in the number of severe or fatal infections.

We know that the novel H1N1 virus preferentially infects younger people. In nearly all areas with large and sustained outbreaks, the majority of cases have occurred in people under the age of 25 years.

In some of these countries, around 2% of cases have developed severe illness, often with very rapid progression to life-threatening pneumonia.

Most cases of severe and fatal infections have been in adults between the ages of 30 and 50 years.

This pattern is significantly different from that seen during epidemics of seasonal influenza, when most deaths occur in frail elderly people.

Many, though not all, severe cases have occurred in people with underlying chronic conditions. Based on limited, preliminary data, conditions most frequently seen include respiratory diseases, notably asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and obesity.

At the same time, it is important to note that around one third to half of the severe and fatal infections are occurring in previously healthy young and middle-aged people.

Without question, pregnant women are at increased risk of complications. This heightened risk takes on added importance for a virus, like this one, that preferentially infects younger age groups.

Finally, and perhaps of greatest concern, we do not know how this virus will behave under conditions typically found in the developing world. To date, the vast majority of cases have been detected and investigated in comparatively well-off countries.

Let me underscore two of many reasons for this concern. First, more than 99% of maternal deaths, which are a marker of poor quality care during pregnancy and childbirth, occurs in the developing world.

Second, around 85% of the burden of chronic diseases is concentrated in low- and middle-income countries.

Although the pandemic appears to have moderate severity in comparatively well-off countries, it is prudent to anticipate a bleaker picture as the virus spreads to areas with limited resources, poor health care, and a high prevalence of underlying medical problems.

Ladies and gentlemen,

A characteristic feature of pandemics is their rapid spread to all parts of the world. In the previous century, this spread has typically taken around 6 to 9 months, even during times when most international travel was by ship or rail.

Countries should prepare to see cases, or the further spread of cases, in the near future. Countries where outbreaks appear to have peaked should prepare for a second wave of infection.

Guidance on specific protective and precautionary measures has been sent to ministries of health in all countries. Countries with no or only a few cases should remain vigilant.

Countries with widespread transmission should focus on the appropriate management of patients. The testing and investigation of patients should be limited, as such measures are resource intensive and can very quickly strain capacities.

WHO has been in close dialogue with influenza vaccine manufacturers. I understand that production of vaccines for seasonal influenza will be completed soon, and that full capacity will be available to ensure the largest possible supply of pandemic vaccine in the months to come.

Pending the availability of vaccines, several non-pharmaceutical interventions can confer some protection.

WHO continues to recommend no restrictions on travel and no border closures.

Influenza pandemics, whether moderate or severe, are remarkable events because of the almost universal susceptibility of the world’s population to infection.

We are all in this together, and we will all get through this, together.

Thank you. [NO, thank you! Really!]

Related Links:

[NOTE: IF you use the term ‘phandemic’ in the above context, quote this source!]

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3 Responses to “Swine Flu Pandemic: Pharmaceuticals Payday”

  1. msrb said

    “NEW FLU” Spin Goes On!

    CDC sees “something different” with new flu
    Fri Jun 19, 2009 9:46am EDT

    By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The new strain of H1N1 flu is causing “something different” to happen in the United States this year — perhaps an extended year-round flu season that disproportionately hits young people, health officials said on Thursday.

    An unusually cool late spring may be helping keep the infection going in the U.S. Northeast, especially densely populated areas in New York and Massachusetts, the officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

    And infections among healthcare workers suggest that people are showing up at work sick — meaning that workplace policies may be contributing to its spread, the CDC officials said.

    The new strain of swine flu is officially a pandemic now, according to the World Health Organization.

    So far the virus is causing mild to moderate disease, but it has killed at least 167 people and been confirmed in nearly 40,000 globally.

    The United States has been hardest hit, with upward of 100,000 likely cases and probably far more, with 44 deaths and 1,600 hospitalized.

    “The fact that we are seeing ongoing transmission now indicates that we are seeing something different,” the CDC’s Dr. Daniel Jernigan told a news briefing.

    “And we believe that that may have to do with the complete lack of immunity to this particular virus among those that are most likely affected. And those are children,” Jernigan added.

    “The areas of the country that are most affected, some of them have very high population densities, like Boston and New York. So that may be a contributor as well. Plus the temperature in that part of the country is cooler, and we know that influenza appears to like the cooler times of the year for making transmission for effective.”

    Jernigan said in areas that are the most affected up to 7 percent of the population has influenza-like illness.

    SUMMER OF FLU

    “The United States will likely continue to see influenza activity through the summer, and at this point we’re anticipating that we will see the novel H1N1 continue with activity probably all the way into our flu season in the fall and winter. The amount of activity we expect to be low, and then pick up later.”

    One worrying pattern: healthcare workers are being infected, and most reported they did little or nothing to protect themselves, the CDC’s Dr. Mike Bell said.

    People coming into emergency departments or clinics need to be checked right away for flu symptoms and anyone working with such a patient needs to wear a mask, gloves and eyewear, Bell said.

    “We’re beginning to see a pattern of healthcare personnel-to-healthcare personnel transmission in some of the clusters, which is also concerning, because it gets to the issue of people showing up to work sick,” Bell said.

    Doctors, nurses and technicians who have flu can spread it to vulnerable patients, Bell noted.

    As of May 13, the CDC said it had received 48 reports of healthcare workers infected with swine flu.

    Detailed case reports on 26 showed that 13 were infected in a healthcare setting such as a clinic or hospital and 12 caught it from infected patients, the CDC said in its weekly report on death and disease.

    (Additional reporting by Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago, editing by Philip Barbara)

    © Thomson Reuters 2009 All rights reserved

  2. Patrick said

    Keep Clean, Safe, Thank you

  3. From Peru said

    “WHO continues to recommend no restrictions on travel and no border closures”

    Because according to their mathematical models, those measures are useless. But ACCORDING TO THE FACTS, the virus has spread via international travelers(see all the news).

    Obviously, it is more important to protect the world turistic industry than to protect the people from a new virus that will at the same time give billions to the pharmaceuticals.

    Using quarantine, the virus could have been trapped in Mexico and the south-west US states infected, and all this stuff will be over months ago.

    Shame on WHO, CDC & co.

    PS: Thank God that this is swine influenza(whith 0,5% mortality = at least 5 million deaths worldwide) and not avian influenza(with 60% mortality = at least 2500 million deaths worlwide). If it were the case, a thermonuclear war will cause less deaths.

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