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Archive for December 5th, 2009

Drought and Deluge: Major Mechanisms Of Collapse

Posted by feww on December 5, 2009

Of the Visible Mechanisms of Collapse Drought and Deluge Are Among Leaders

For most everyone it would be difficult to imagine dealing with about 2,800 mm of rainfall in 6 months; however, many Filipinos experienced such catastrophic deluge caused by 12 storm between May and November 2009.

It’s not known whether the Island of Luzon would ever recover from the 2009 tropical cyclones, or how much worse the next few seasons could get.

The consensus among our colleagues at EDRO is that the mechanisms of collapse will intensify globally.

Brief History of 2009 Tropical Cyclones that affected The Philippines

  • May 2 and 3, 2009. Tropical Storm Kujira brought torrential rains which triggered floods in  southern Luzon (northeast and central Philippines).
  • May 7. Typhoon Chan-hom (“Emong”) struck the northwest coast of Luzon with more heavy rains and yet more flooding.
  • June 12 – 22 and June 23 – 25. Typhoon Linfa and Tropical Storm Nangka [“Feria”] passed over the Philippines triggering more heavy rains, floods, and landslides. Many tornadoes worsened the impact of Nangka.
  • July 10 – 11. Tropical Storm Soudelor [“Gorio”] reduced to a tropical depression, Soudelor moved close to northern Luzon, producing more than 330 mm of rainfall which triggered flash floods and landslides in a dozen villages.
  • July 16 – 18. Typhoon Molave [“Isang”] passed close to northern Philippines causing yet more flooding in the region.
  • August 1. Tropical Storm Goni (Jolina) affected about 120,000 people, with a dozen dead or missing in 120 villages, 25 towns and 5 cities.
  • August 3 – 11. Typhoon Morakot [“Kiko”] left ten villages in the Philippines,submerged in up to 2-meters of  floodwater after the Pinatubo Dike overflowed. Morakot dumped over 2,500 mm of rain over parts of Taiwan.
  • September 9, 2009 Tropical Storm Mujigae [“Maring”] was lurking around in Soth China Sea near western Luzon causing more rainfall.
  • September 11 – 13. Typhoon Koppu [“Nando”] caused a 48 hour downpour over parts of Luzon and a   24 hour rainfall over Visayas and Mindanao,as it enhanced the impact of the southwest monsoon.
  • September 26. Typhoon Ketsana [“Ondoy”] triggered Manila’s worst flooding in living memory.
  • October 1. Typhoon Parma followed quickly after, churning Manila to Vanilla.
  • Late October 2009. Typhoons Lupit and Mirinae left trails of destructioon in theier wakes.

Rainfall from Philippine Typhoons – NASA EO


This image illustrates the rainfall in the Philippines from 12 named storms between May and October in 2009. Two storms, Ketsana and Parma, brought unusually heavy flood-inducing rain within a two-week span at the end of September and early October. Image includes only the rain when each of the 12 storms were active. The heaviest rainfall, in excess of 2000 millimeters (80 inches), is shown in dark blue.

The data for the image came from the Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis, which calibrates rainfall estimates from many satellites using rainfall measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen. Caption by Holli Riebeek. Acquired May 2, 2009 – November 2, 2009. Released December 5, 2009 [Edited by FEWW]


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