Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Klyuchevskaya, Bezymianny and Sakurajima Erupt

Posted by feww on February 19, 2010

Satellite images of 3 erupting volcanoes


Sakurajima Volcano in southern Japan erupted more than 400 times during 2009, and activity was increasing in early 2010. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this natural-color image of the erupting volcano on February 15, 2010. Gray ash is visible in the plume that extends northeast (towards the lower-right) of the volcano. Ashfall is a regular occurrence at the daikon and mandarin farms surrounding the volcano, as well as in the nearby cities of Kagoshima and Kirishima. NASA Earth Observatory image and caption by Robert Simmon. Click image to enlarge.


Neighboring volcanoes on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula Klyuchevskaya Volcano in the north and Bezymianny Volcano in the south both erupted. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this false-color image on February 13, 2010. [But the image was released today, 6 days later.]  Reaching a height of 4,835 meters (15,860 feet), Klyuchevskaya (also Kliuchevskoi) Volcano is both the tallest and most active volcano on Kamchatka. Dwarfed by its neighbor, Bezymianny reaches 2,882 meters (9,455 feet) above sea level. It released a smaller, thinner plume than Klyuchevskaya.
NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen. Caption by Michon Scott. Edited by FEWW. Click image to enlarge.

Related Links:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.