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Gobi Desert Dust Storms: Major Mechanism for Mega Disasters

Posted by feww on May 14, 2011

MAY YOU LIVE IN CHANGING TIMES!

Thick Plumes of Sand and Dust Continue to Blow Out of Gobi Desert Choking East Asia

The Gobi Desert Pictorial Disaster Calendar: Satellite images of ongoing severe sand and dust storms over East Asia

Gobi Dust over the Sea of Japan


Thick plumes of dust from Gobi Desert covered the Sea of Japan on May 13, 2011, when MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite took this photo-like image.


Massive plumes of sand and dust blew out of the Gobi Desert on May 11 moving toward northeastern China, and covering the provinces of Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning the next day when MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite took this image. The visibility in the region was reportedly reduced to about 1,000 meters (3,000 feet). 

Gobi Desert Sand and Dust Storms Plague East Asia


For a second time in 12 days, large plumes of sand and dust blew out of the Gobi Desert and spread across the Mongolia-China border. MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite took this photo-like image on May 11, 2011.


Sand and dust storms from the Gobi Desert blew across China covering the Yellow Sea in late April and early May 2011. MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image on May 1. 2011.


Gobi Desert dust plumes  blew eastward in late April 2011.  MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image on April 29, 2011.

Fast-moving sand from Gobi Desert reaches as far as east coast of Japan


A true color image of North China Plain, Shandong Peninsula and the Bo Haitaken was taken by MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite as sand  from Gobi Desert blew across the region. Source: NASA E-O.   Download large image (3 MB, JPEG) – Image acquired November 11, 2010


A dust storm that blew through Asia’s Gobi Desert on November 10, 2010, quickly intensified as the day wore on. When the MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image at 1:50 p.m. Beijing time (5:50 UTC), the dust plumes were considerably thicker than they had been just two hours earlier. Smaller dust plumes also appeared north of the Mongolia-China border. Source of image and caption: NASA E-O.


The dust from Gobi Desert passed over the East China Sea, and the Sea of Japan on November 12, 2010, when MODIS on NASA’s Terra satellite took this image. “A veil of dust forms an arc hundreds of kilometers long, and extends from the Yellow Sea to the northern Sea of Japan. Thick dust also blows over the nation of Japan. In the northeast, clouds hide parts of the dust plume. Although skies appear mostly dust-free over the Korean Peninsula, weather reports from November 11 and 12 reported widespread dust over Seoul, the location of the Group of 20 summit.” Source of image and caption: NASA E-O. Download large image (7 MB, JPEG).

Click images to enlarge.  (Source of images: NASA-EO)

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