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Earth is fighting to stay alive – mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin in 2016

Japanese Massacre of Indonesians in Mandor Commemorated

Posted by feww on June 28, 2015

Up to 14 million people massacred by the Japanese between 1895 and 1945 —U.S. historian

Japanese occupiers massacred more than 21,000 people, including many women and children, near Pontianak between April 23, 1943 to June 28, 1944.

[Pontianak is the provincial capital of West Kalimantan, one of five Indonesian provinces in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo. Editor]

Most of the victims were buried in giant wells in Mandor, located about 88 km from Pontianak. Remains of more victims were discovered in mass, unmarked graves in Mandor and the surrounding areas in 2005, more than 60 years after the massacre.

Juang Mandor Monument
Indonesian victims of one of the Japanese massacres in WWII commemorated at the Juang Mandor Monument in Mandor town, near Pontianak, capital of West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia, June 28, 2015. (Xinhua/Zulkarnain). More images…

Japanese War Crimes in Asian and Pacific Countries

Japanese committed numerous war crimes in many Asian and Pacific countries throughout the period of Japanese imperialism, especially during the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II, under Emperor Hirohito.

The scorched earth policy, sanctioned by Emperor Hirohito himself, ordered Japanese forces to “Kill All, Burn All, and Loot All.”

The total number of victims massacred by the “Japanese is more like 10-million to 14-million. Of these, I would suggest that between 6-million and 8-million were ethnic Chinese, regardless of where they were resident,” according to Sterling and Peggy Seagrave.

[The Tokyo Tribunal determined the death rate among POWs from Asian countries under Japanese occupation was 27.1%. However, the death rate of Chinese POWs was much higher because Emperor Hirohito ratified a directive on August 5, 1937 removing the constraints of international law on treatment of Chinese prisoners of war. Editor]

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