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Earth Experiences 2nd Warmest Year to Date

Posted by feww on June 20, 2017

2nd warmest year to date and 3rd warmest May on record

Year to date – January through May 2017

The year-to-date (January–May) globally-average temperature across land and ocean surfaces for 2017 was 0.92°C (1.66°F) above the 20th century average of 13.1°C (55.5°F). This was the second highest January–May period in the 138-year record, falling behind the record year 2016 by 0.17°C (0.31°F).

May 2017 saw the average global temperature rising 0.83°C (1.49°F) above the 20th century average of 14.8°C (58.6°F) and the third highest May in the 138-year global records, behind 2016 (+0.89°C / +1.60°F) and 2015 (+0.86°C / +1.55°F), according to researchers at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information.

Warmer-than-average lands and oceans

The globally averaged land-surface temperature (seventh warmest for the month of May) and the sea-surface temperature (third warmest) ranked second highest on record for the March-to-May season and the year to date.

Both poles recorded below-average sea ice again

The average Arctic sea ice extent for May dropped 5.3 percent below the 1981-2010 average, the fifth smallest for the month since satellite records began in 1979. The average Antarctic sea ice extent was 10.6 percent below average, the second smallest on record for May behind 1980.

 

SST

The average May temperature for the global oceans was 0.71°C (1.28°F) above the 20th century average of 16.3°C (61.3°F). This was the third highest May global ocean temperature in the 138-year record, trailing behind 2016 (+0.76°C / +1.37°F) and 2015 (+0.72°C / +1.30°F).

LST

The global land-only surface temperature was the coolest May land temperature since 2011 and the seventh highest since global records began in 1880 at 1.15°C (2.07°F) above the 20th century average 11.1°C (52.0°F).

Portugal [Apocalyptic Fires Incinerate Victims Fleeing in their Cars]

Unusually warm temperatures engulfed Portugal during May 2017. Portugal’s national average mean temperature was 18.47°C (65.25°F) or 2.74°C (4.93°F) above average—the third highest May temperature since national records began in 1931, trailing behind 2011 and 2015. The nation’s average maximum temperature was 24.96°C (76.93°F), which is 4.0°C (7.2°F) above average and the second highest May maximum temperature since 1931.

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, State of the Climate: Global Climate Report for May 2017, published online June 2017, retrieved on June 20, 2017 from https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201705

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8 Responses to “Earth Experiences 2nd Warmest Year to Date”

  1. DM said

    Globe had 3rd warmest year to date and 4th warmest October on record
    Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice coverage remains small

    The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for October 2017 tied with 2003 as the fourth highest for the month of October in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back 138 years to 1880. The year-to-date global temperature was third warmest on record.

    Map of global selected significant climate anomalies and events for October 2017

    This monthly summary, developed by scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, is part of the suite of climate services NOAA provides to government, business, academia, and the public to support informed decision-making.
    October 2017 Temperature

    Map of global temperature percentiles for October 2017

    The October temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.31°F above the 20th century average of 57.1°F, tying with 2003 as the fourth highest value for October in the 138-year period of record, behind 2015 (highest), 2014 (second highest), and 2016 (third highest). The October 2017 above-average global land and ocean temperature was mainly driven by warmer ocean temperatures. October 2017 marks the 41st consecutive October and the 394th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average.
    The October globally averaged land surface temperature was 1.78°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This value was the 11th highest October land global temperature in the 1880–2017 record.
    The October globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.13°F above the 20th century monthly average of 60.6°F. This was the fourth highest global ocean temperature for October in the record, behind 2015 (highest), 2016 (second highest), and 2014 (third highest).

    October 2017 Sea Ice and Snow Cover

    Maps of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent in October 2017

    The average Arctic sea ice extent for October was 633,000 square miles (19.6 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, according to analysis by the National Snow and Ice Data Center using data from NOAA and NASA. Sea ice extent was below average throughout much of the Arctic, particularly in the Chukchi, Kara, and Barents Seas. Overall, this was the fifth smallest October extent since records began in 1979.
    Antarctic sea ice extent during October 2017 was 160,000 square miles (2.2 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, also the fifth smallest October value on record. On October 11 and 12, the Antarctic sea ice extent reached its annual maximum extent at 6.96 million square miles. This was the second smallest Antarctic sea ice extent maximum on record and tied with 2002 as the latest date of occurrence.
    According to data from NOAA and analyzed by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent during October was 1.4 million square miles above the 1981–2010 average. This was the ninth largest October Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent in the 50-year period of record. The North American snow cover extent was the seventh largest on record, while the Eurasian snow cover extent was the 11th largest.

    Year-to-Date (January–October 2017)

    Map of global temperature percentiles for January to October 2017

    The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.55°F above the 20th century average of 57.4°F. This was the third highest value for January–October in the 1880–2017 record, behind the record year of 2016 and 2015 (second highest). Nine of the ten warmest January–October global land and ocean temperatures occurred since 2005.
    The year-to-date globally averaged land surface temperature was 2.39°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This was the second highest for January–October in the 138-year record, behind 2016 by 0.32°F.
    The year-to-date globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.22°F above the 20th century average of 61.0°F. This was the third highest for January–October in the record, behind 2016 (highest) and 2015 (second highest).

    https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/global-climate-201710

    Global Climate Report – October 2017
    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201710

    DM

  2. DM said

    Globe had 3rd warmest year to date and 4th warmest October on record
    Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice coverage remains small

    The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for October 2017 tied with 2003 as the fourth highest for the month of October in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back 138 years to 1880. The year-to-date global temperature was third warmest on record.

    Map of global selected significant climate anomalies and events for October 2017

    This monthly summary, developed by scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, is part of the suite of climate services NOAA provides to government, business, academia, and the public to support informed decision-making.
    October 2017 Temperature

    Map of global temperature percentiles for October 2017

    The October temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.31°F above the 20th century average of 57.1°F, tying with 2003 as the fourth highest value for October in the 138-year period of record, behind 2015 (highest), 2014 (second highest), and 2016 (third highest). The October 2017 above-average global land and ocean temperature was mainly driven by warmer ocean temperatures. October 2017 marks the 41st consecutive October and the 394th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average.
    The October globally averaged land surface temperature was 1.78°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This value was the 11th highest October land global temperature in the 1880–2017 record.
    The October globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.13°F above the 20th century monthly average of 60.6°F. This was the fourth highest global ocean temperature for October in the record, behind 2015 (highest), 2016 (second highest), and 2014 (third highest).

    October 2017 Sea Ice and Snow Cover

    Maps of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent in October 2017

    The average Arctic sea ice extent for October was 633,000 square miles (19.6 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, according to analysis by the National Snow and Ice Data Center using data from NOAA and NASA. Sea ice extent was below average throughout much of the Arctic, particularly in the Chukchi, Kara, and Barents Seas. Overall, this was the fifth smallest October extent since records began in 1979.
    Antarctic sea ice extent during October 2017 was 160,000 square miles (2.2 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, also the fifth smallest October value on record. On October 11 and 12, the Antarctic sea ice extent reached its annual maximum extent at 6.96 million square miles. This was the second smallest Antarctic sea ice extent maximum on record and tied with 2002 as the latest date of occurrence.
    According to data from NOAA and analyzed by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent during October was 1.4 million square miles above the 1981–2010 average. This was the ninth largest October Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent in the 50-year period of record. The North American snow cover extent was the seventh largest on record, while the Eurasian snow cover extent was the 11th largest.

    Year-to-Date (January–October 2017)

    Map of global temperature percentiles for January to October 2017

    The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.55°F above the 20th century average of 57.4°F. This was the third highest value for January–October in the 1880–2017 record, behind the record year of 2016 and 2015 (second highest). Nine of the ten warmest January–October global land and ocean temperatures occurred since 2005.
    The year-to-date globally averaged land surface temperature was 2.39°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This was the second highest for January–October in the 138-year record, behind 2016 by 0.32°F.
    The year-to-date globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.22°F above the 20th century average of 61.0°F. This was the third highest for January–October in the record, behind 2016 (highest) and 2015 (second highest).

    https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/global-climate-201710

    Global Climate Report – October 2017
    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201710

    DM

  3. DM said

    Globe had 3rd warmest year to date and 4th warmest October on record
    Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice coverage remains small

    The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for October 2017 tied with 2003 as the fourth highest for the month of October in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back 138 years to 1880. The year-to-date global temperature was third warmest on record.

    Map of global selected significant climate anomalies and events for October 2017

    This monthly summary, developed by scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, is part of the suite of climate services NOAA provides to government, business, academia, and the public to support informed decision-making.
    October 2017 Temperature

    Map of global temperature percentiles for October 2017

    The October temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.31°F above the 20th century average of 57.1°F, tying with 2003 as the fourth highest value for October in the 138-year period of record, behind 2015 (highest), 2014 (second highest), and 2016 (third highest). The October 2017 above-average global land and ocean temperature was mainly driven by warmer ocean temperatures. October 2017 marks the 41st consecutive October and the 394th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average.
    The October globally averaged land surface temperature was 1.78°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This value was the 11th highest October land global temperature in the 1880–2017 record.
    The October globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.13°F above the 20th century monthly average of 60.6°F. This was the fourth highest global ocean temperature for October in the record, behind 2015 (highest), 2016 (second highest), and 2014 (third highest).

    October 2017 Sea Ice and Snow Cover

    Maps of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent in October 2017

    The average Arctic sea ice extent for October was 633,000 square miles (19.6 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, according to analysis by the National Snow and Ice Data Center using data from NOAA and NASA. Sea ice extent was below average throughout much of the Arctic, particularly in the Chukchi, Kara, and Barents Seas. Overall, this was the fifth smallest October extent since records began in 1979.
    Antarctic sea ice extent during October 2017 was 160,000 square miles (2.2 percent) below the 1981–2010 average, also the fifth smallest October value on record. On October 11 and 12, the Antarctic sea ice extent reached its annual maximum extent at 6.96 million square miles. This was the second smallest Antarctic sea ice extent maximum on record and tied with 2002 as the latest date of occurrence.
    According to data from NOAA and analyzed by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab, the Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent during October was 1.4 million square miles above the 1981–2010 average. This was the ninth largest October Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent in the 50-year period of record. The North American snow cover extent was the seventh largest on record, while the Eurasian snow cover extent was the 11th largest.

    Year-to-Date (January–October 2017)

    Map of global temperature percentiles for January to October 2017

    The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.55°F above the 20th century average of 57.4°F. This was the third highest value for January–October in the 1880–2017 record, behind the record year of 2016 and 2015 (second highest). Nine of the ten warmest January–October global land and ocean temperatures occurred since 2005.
    The year-to-date globally averaged land surface temperature was 2.39°F above the 20th century average of 48.7°F. This was the second highest for January–October in the 138-year record, behind 2016 by 0.32°F.
    The year-to-date globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.22°F above the 20th century average of 61.0°F. This was the third highest for January–October in the record, behind 2016 (highest) and 2015 (second highest).

    https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/global-climate-201710

    Global Climate Report – October 2017
    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201710
    DM

  4. Tom D. said

    2017 is set to be in top three hottest years, with record-breaking extreme weather

    WMO Statement on the State of the Global Climate in 2017
    Provisional Release 06.11.2017

    Executive Summary
    Whilst 2017 has been a cooler year than the record – setting 2016, it is very likely to be one of the three warmest years on record, and the warmest not influenced by an El Niño event. The five-year average 2013 – 2017 global average temperature is currently close to 1°C above the average for 1880 – 1900 and is likely to be the highest five-year average on record.

    The world also continues to see rising sea levels, with some level of acceleration and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. The cryosphere continued its contraction, in particular in the Arctic where sea ice extent co ntinued shrinking, and Antarctic sea ice extent started shrinking since last year aft er a multi-year period of stable or even slight expansion.

    The overall risk of heat-related illness or death has climbed steadily since 1980, with around 30% of the world’s population now living in clima tic conditions with extreme hot temperatures persisting several days a year. Between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events has increased by approximately 125 million. https://public.wmo.int/en

  5. CRR said

    Globe had 2nd warmest year to date, 4th warmest September on record
    Arctic and Antarctic sea ice coverage remains small
    September was 41st consecutive September and the 393rd consecutive month with temperatures above the 20th-century average.

    September 2017

    The average global temperature set in September 2017 was 1.40 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 59.0 degrees, according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. This average temperature was the fourth highest for September in the 1880-2017 record. This marked the 41st consecutive September and the 393rd consecutive month with temperatures above the 20th-century average.

    Year to date | January through September 2017

    The year-to-date average temperature was 1.57 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 57.5 degrees. This was the second warmest for this period, 0.23 of a degree behind the record set in 2016. Nine of the 10 warmest January-September global temperatures have occurred since 2005, with 1998 as the only exception.
    Here are some noteworthy climate events that occurred around the world in September.
    Here are some noteworthy climate events that occurred around the world in September. (NOAA NCEI)

    Other notable climate events and facts around the world last month included:

    Below-average sea ice at the poles persists

    The average Arctic sea ice coverage in September was 25.5 percent below the 1981-2010 average, the seventh smallest on record. On September 13, Arctic sea ice reached its annual minimum extent (coverage) at 1.79 million square miles, the eighth smallest in the 1979–2017 satellite record.

    Antarctic sea ice extent in September was 4.2 percent below average, the second smallest on record.

    Warmer-than-average lands and oceans

    The globally averaged land-surface temperature ranked as third warmest for the month of September and second highest for the year to date (January to September).

    The globally averaged sea-surface temperature ranked fourth warmest for September and third highest for the year to date.

    Africa leads the continents in September warmth rankings

    Africa had its warmest September on record; South America, its fifth; Asia, its seventh; North America, its eighth; Oceania, its 12th; and Europe, its 19th.
    SOURCE: http://www.noaa.gov/news/globe-had-2nd-warmest-year-to-date-4th-warmest-september-on-record

  6. BGS said

    Globe sees 2nd warmest year to date, 3rd warmest August on record
    Arctic and Antarctic sea ice coverage remains at near-record lows
    The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for August 2017 was the third highest for the month of August in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back to 1880. The June–August seasonal global temperature was also third highest on record, while the year-to-date global temperature was second warmest in the 138-year record.


    Map of global selected significant climate anomalies and events for August 2017

    This monthly summary, developed by scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information, is part of the suite of climate services NOAA provides to government, business, academia, and the public to support informed decision-making.

    August 2017 Temperature

    Map of global temperature percentiles for August 2017

    The August temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.49°F above the 20th century average of 60.1°F. This was the third highest for August in the 1880–2017 record, behind 2016 (highest) and 2015 (second highest). August 2017 marks the 41st consecutive August and the 392nd consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average.
    The August globally averaged land surface temperature was 2.11°F above the 20th century average of 56.9°F and the second highest August land global temperature in the 138-year record, trailing behind the record year 2016.
    The August globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.28°F above the 20th century monthly average of 61.4°F—the fourth highest global ocean temperature for August in the record.

    August 2017 Sea Ice

    Maps of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent in August 2017

    The average Arctic sea ice extent for August was 683,000 square miles (24.3 percent) below the 1981–2010 average. This was the third smallest August sea ice extent since records began in 1979, according to an analysis by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (link is external) based on data from NOAA and NASA.
    The Antarctic sea ice extent for August was 250,000 square miles (3.6 percent) below the 1981–2010 average. This was the second smallest August Antarctic sea ice extent since records began in 1979, behind 2002.

    Seasonal (June–August 2017)
    jhttps://www.ncei.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/styles/wide_full_width_image_no_crop/public/sites/default/files/june-august-2017-global-temperature-percentiles-map.png
    Map of global temperature percentiles for June to August 2017

    The June–August average temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.46°F above the 20th century average of 60.1°F. This was the third highest for June–August in the 1880–2017 record, behind 2016 (highest) and 2015 (second highest).
    The Northern Hemisphere global land and ocean temperature during summer 2017 was 1.76°F above average and the third highest summer temperature on record. Similarly, the Southern Hemisphere global land and ocean temperature during winter 2017 tied with 2009 as the third highest on record at 1.17°F above average.
    The globally averaged land surface temperature for June–August 2017 was 2.07°F above the 20th century average of 56.9°F. This was the second highest for June–August in the 138-year record, behind 2016.
    The June–August globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.24°F above the 20th century average of 61.5°F—the fourth highest for June–August in the record.

    Year-to-Date (January–August 2017)

    Map of global temperature percentiles for January to August 2017

    The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.58°F above the 20th century average of 57.3°F. This was the second highest for January–August in the 1880–2017 record, behind the record year 2016.
    The year-to-date globally averaged land surface temperature was 2.50°F above the 20th century average of 48.1°F. This was also the second highest for January–August in the record, behind 2016.
    The year-to-date globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.24°F above the 20th century average of 61.1°F. This value tied with 2015 as the second highest for January–August in the 138-year record, trailing behind the record year 2016.
    https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/global-climate-201708

    For a more complete summary of climate conditions and events, see our August 2017 Global Climate Report. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/2017/08

  7. G.H. said

    Globe had 2nd warmest July and year to date on record
    http://www.noaa.gov/news/globe-had-2nd-warmest-july-and-year-to-date-on-record

    Earth’s warmest month is typically July, when the strong mid-summer sun heats up large Northern Hemisphere land masses and adjacent coastal areas. In fact, July 2017 was not only the warmest month of this year, but also the second warmest July on record, trailing the record set in 2016.

    July 2017

    The average global temperature in July was 1.49 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees, according to scientists from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. This was the second-highest average temperature for July in the 138-year climate record, trailing last year. July 2017 marked the 41st consecutive July and the 391th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th-century average.

    Year to date | January through July 2017

    The year-to-date average temperature was 1.62 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 56.9 degrees. This was the second-warmest for this period, a quarter of a degree behind the record set in 2016.
    Here are some notable climate events that occurred around the world in July 2017.

    Other notable climate events and facts around the world last month included:

    Record and near-record sea ice at the poles: The average Arctic sea ice extent (coverage) for July was 16.1 percent below the 1981-2010 average, the fifth smallest for the month since satellite records began in 1979. The average Antarctic sea ice extent was 4.5 percent below average, the smallest on record for July.

    Warmer-than-average lands and oceans: The globally averaged land-surface temperature (warmest for the month of July) and the sea-surface temperature (third warmest for July) ranked second highest on record for the year to date.

    Africa and Oceania led the continents in warmth rankings: Africa and Oceania had their warmest July on record; North America (tied with 2016) and Asia, had their 5th; South America, its seventh; and Europe, its 17th.

    Other notable climate events and facts around the world last month included:

    Record and near-record sea ice at the poles: The average Arctic sea ice extent (coverage) for July was 16.1 percent below the 1981-2010 average, the fifth smallest for the month since satellite records began in 1979. The average Antarctic sea ice extent was 4.5 percent below average, the smallest on record for July.

    Warmer-than-average lands and oceans: The globally averaged land-surface temperature (warmest for the month of July) and the sea-surface temperature (third warmest for July) ranked second highest on record for the year to date.

    Africa and Oceania led the continents in warmth rankings: Africa and Oceania had their warmest July on record; North America (tied with 2016) and Asia, had their 5th; South America, its seventh; and Europe, its 17th.

  8. EMC said

    Global Climate Report – June 2017

    June 2017 was characterized by warmer to much-warmer-than-average conditions across much of the world’s land and ocean surface. The most notable warm temperature departure from average were present across much of central Asia, western and central Europe, and the southwestern contiguous U.S. where temperature departures from average were 2.0°C (3.6°F) or greater.

    The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for June 2017 was the third highest for the month of June in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back 138-years to 1880. The year-to-date global temperature was second warmest on record.

    Overall, the combined global land and ocean surface temperature for June 2017 was 0.82°C (1.48°F) above the 20th century average of 15.5°C (59.9°F) and the third highest June temperature in the 138-year record, behind 2016 (+0.92°C / +1.66°F) and 2015 (+0.89°C / +1.60). June 2017 marks the 41st consecutive June and the 390th consecutive month with temperatures at least nominally above the 20th century average.

    Similarly, the global land temperature for June 2017 was 1.15°C (2.07°F) above the 20th century average of 13.3°C (55.9°F). This was the fourth highest June global land temperature in the 138-year record, behind 2016 (+1.29°C / +2.32°F), 2015 (+1.28°C / +2.30°F), and 2012 (+1.22°C / +2.20°F). June 2017 was the 35th consecutive June with temperatures at least nominally above average.

    Across the oceans, the average global ocean surface temperature during June 2017 was 0.70°C (1.26°F) above the 20th century average of 16.4°C (61.5°F)—the third highest June temperature since global records began in 1880, behind 2016 (+0.78°C / +1.40°F) and 2015 (+0.74°C / +1.33°F). June 2017 marks the 41st consecutive June that the global sea surface temperature was nominally above the 20th century average.

    The first six months of 2017 have each ranked among the top three warmest months on record, giving way to the second highest January–June period in the 138-year record at 0.91°C (1.64°F) above the 20th century average of 13.5°C (56.3°F), behind the record year of 2016 by 0.16°C (0.29°F), but ahead of 2015 by 0.05°C (0.09°F).

    NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, State of the Climate: Global Climate Report for June 2017, published online July 2017, retrieved on July 24, 2017 from https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201706.

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