Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Archive for July 12th, 2017

Large Fires Burning Across 15 US States

Posted by feww on July 12, 2017

National Preparedness Raised to Level 4  (Scale of 1 to 5)

Total fires: 175 new fires
Cumulative Acres: 1,040,056
Fire Crews: 359
Engines: 1,180
Helicopters: 114
Personnel: 16,082

Number of Active Large Fires: 56

States currently reporting large fires:  15

Alaska (1), Arizona (10), California (9), Colorado (6), Florida (1), Idaho (2), Montana (7), Nevada (9), New Mexico (1), North Dakota (1), Oregon (3), Texas (1), Utah (3), Washington (1) and Wyoming (1).

Fires and Acres Year-to-Date

  • TOTAL FIRES: 33,430
  • TOTAL ACRES: 3,760,090

Ten Year Average (2007 – 2016, as of today): 36,288 Fires; 2,792,16 acres

Prescribed Fires and Acres Year-to-Date

  • TOTAL FIRES: 61,118
  • TOTAL ACRES:  2,873,85

Canada Fires and Hectares YEAR-TO-DATE

Hectares: 341,314  (1 Hectare = 2.47 Acres)

Source: NIFC

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Trillion-ton Iceberg Brakes Off Antarctica

Posted by feww on July 12, 2017

Larsen C Calves Giant Iceberg [“A68”]

One of the largest icebergs on record has finally calved away from the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica. The 5,500km² section of Larsen C broke away during the past 48 hours. The iceberg could be named “A68.” It has a volume of about 1,150km³, weighing about 1.1 trillion tons.

A cluster of mini icebergs may have also broken off the ice shelf.

Related Links

Source of image: http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/07/Monitoring_the_rift

Image Details:

  • Title Monitoring the rift
  • Released 12/07/2017 1:46 pm
  • Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016–17), processed by Swansea University
  • Description The fissure in the Larsen C ice shelf first appeared several years ago, but seemed relatively stable until January 2016, when it began to lengthen. In January 2017 alone it travelled 20 km, reaching a total length of about 175 km. After a few weeks of calm, the rift propagated a further 16 km at the end of May, and then extended further at the end of June. More importantly, as the crack grew, it branched off towards the edge of the shelf, whereas before it had been running parallel to the Weddell Sea. With just a few km between the end of the fissure and the ocean by early July, the fate of the shelf was sealed. Images from 12 July showed that part of the ice shelf had finally broken away.
  • Id 380991

 

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

FIRE-EARTH V-E Alert: NST1

Posted by feww on July 12, 2017

  • All Groups

FIRE-EARTH V-E Alert: NST1

[Issued by FIRE-EARTH Science Team.]

  • Details available from FIRE-EARTH PULSARS.

 

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

FIRE-EARTH E-E ALERT – 071201

Posted by feww on July 12, 2017

  • All Groups

FIRE-EARTH E-E ALERT – 071201

[Issued by FIRE-EARTH Science Team.]

  • Details via FIRE-EARTH PULSARS.

 

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived” –Study

Posted by feww on July 12, 2017

Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines

Gerardo CeballosPaul R. Ehrlich, Rodolfo Dirzo

Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City 04510, Mexico;  Department of Biology, Stanford, 94305

Significance

The strong focus on species extinctions, a critical aspect of the contemporary pulse of biological extinction, leads to a common misimpression that Earth’s biota is not immediately threatened, just slowly entering an episode of major biodiversity loss. This view overlooks the current trends of population declines and extinctions. Using a sample of 27,600 terrestrial vertebrate species, and a more detailed analysis of 177 mammal species, we show the extremely high degree of population decay in vertebrates, even in common “species of low concern.” Dwindling population sizes and range shrinkages amount to a massive anthropogenic erosion of biodiversity and of the ecosystem services essential to civilization. This “biological annihilation” underlines the seriousness for humanity of Earth’s ongoing sixth mass extinction event.

Abstract

The population extinction pulse we describe here shows, from a quantitative viewpoint, that Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe than perceived when looking exclusively at species extinctions. Therefore, humanity needs to address anthropogenic population extirpation and decimation immediately. That conclusion is based on analyses of the numbers and degrees of range contraction (indicative of population shrinkage and/or population extinctions according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature) using a sample of 27,600 vertebrate species, and on a more detailed analysis documenting the population extinctions between 1900 and 2015 in 177 mammal species. We find that the rate of population loss in terrestrial vertebrates is extremely high—even in “species of low concern.” In our sample, comprising nearly half of known vertebrate species, 32% (8,851/27,600) are decreasing; that is, they have decreased in population size and range. In the 177 mammals for which we have detailed data, all have lost 30% or more of their geographic ranges and more than 40% of the species have experienced severe population declines (>80% range shrinkage). Our data indicate that beyond global species extinctions Earth is experiencing a huge episode of population declines and extirpations, which will have negative cascading consequences on ecosystem functioning and services vital to sustaining civilization. We describe this as a “biological annihilation” to highlight the current magnitude of Earth’s ongoing sixth major extinction event.

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/07/05/1704949114

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »