Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Archive for the ‘Australian Coal export’ Category

Australian Oil Leak Disaster – Update April 5

Posted by feww on April 5, 2010

Serial No  1,537. If any posts are blocked in your country, please drop us a line.

Leaky Chinese bulk coal carrier Shen Neng 1 assessed for salvage

Background:  Another Oil Leak Nightmare Made in Australia


Images of the 230-meter long coal tanker Shen Neng 1, which ran aground on a reef about 70km east of Great Keppel Island, off the coast of Queensland, Australia, were taken by Maritime Safety Queensland on Sunday (p.m.), 4 April 2010. Images may be subject to copyright. Click images to enlarge.

The 230-meter (754-ft) coal tanker Shen Neng 1 was carrying 65,000 tons of coal to China, with 975 tons of heavy fuel oil on board. Based on all the information available, and in all probability, the vessel could break apart causing an even larger disaster.

The following News Release is by Maritime Safety Queensland:

Ship grounding off Central Queensland – 6:00am update (5 April 2010)

Professional salvors are onboard the Shen Neng 1 this morning to begin the process of salvaging the grounded Chinese bulk coal carrier.

They are part of the salvage contract and more will arrive this morning – they will assess the structural integrity of the ship and options for refloating.

The Shen Neng 1 ran aground about 70km east of Great Keppel Island just after 5pm on Saturday with approximately 975 tonnes of heavy fuel oil onboard.

Maritime Safety Queensland General Manager, Patrick Quirk, said the initial damage report was that the main engine room was breached, the main engine damaged and the rudder seriously damaged.

“One of the most worrying aspects is that the ship is still moving on the reef to the action of the seas, which is doing further damage,” he said.

“MSQ have aircraft in the air now doing an assessment, although the hope is that little oil escaped through the night.

“We also have helicopters surveying the coast to prepare early planning in the event of needing to get equipment onto the beach.

“A second tug is due to arrive in the early afternoon to assist the specialised tug already there to stabilise the vessel,” Mr Quirk said.

He said dispersants were deployed yesterday on oil leaking from the carrier.

Dispersants are most effective in breaking up heavy oil when deployed within 24-48 hours.

Related Links:

Posted in Australian Coal export, china coal consumption, Great Keppel Island, Maritime Safety Queensland, Queensland coast | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

The Australian Clean Energy Ruse

Posted by feww on May 17, 2009

Australia plans to build 1000 megawatts solar power plant—world’s largest

Australia will invest A$1.4 billion (US$1.05 billion) to build a 1,000 MW solar power station, the world’s largest solar plant,  Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, said today.

Rudd called the country’s abundant sunshine  “Australia’s biggest natural resource,” saying that the project would help the country become a leader in renewable, clean energy.

“The government plans to invest with industry in the biggest solar generation plant in the world, three times the size of the world’s current biggest, which is in California,” Rudd said.

“Why are we doing this? We are doing it in order to support a clean energy future for Australia, we’re doing it to boost economic activity now and we’re doing it also to provide jobs and much needed opportunities for business as well.”

“We don’t want to be clean energy followers worldwide, we want to be clean energy leaders worldwide.” Rudd said.

But how would yours be any bigger than ours or half dozen other countries’?


A broad view of parabolic trough solar collectors at Kramer Junction in the Mojave desert in California. Image source.

Currently, Solar Energy Generating Systems (SEGS) is the world’s largest solar energy generating facility, which consists of nine solar power plants, located in Mojave Desert, Calif., generating a combined total of about 355 MW [Kramer Junction (150 MW), Harper Lake (160 MW) and  Daggett (44 MW).]  However by the time the proposed Australian plant is commissioned, there would be at least another half dozen other plants throughout the world with 1,300 MW or larger capacities.

Rudd said the project is a part of  a wider A$4.65 “green energy” initiative by his government that would allow Australia to become a full member of the International Renewable Energy Agency.

Great! But what’s Australia doing with its large reserves of coal? And how does that make it any cleaner on a global level if someone else burned the Australian coal instead?

Australia has 5% of global reserves of black coal (~ 40 Gigatons, Gt) and 24% of global reserves of brown coal (~37.5 Gt). With a total annual production of about 390 Mt, Australia is the world’s largest exporter with about 30% of world total coal export trade (250Mt) and nearly 5% of world consumption.

Coal also comprises Australia’s largest single export (~ $A23 billion), an industry with up to 150,000 employees, and is used to generate about 85% of Australia’s electricity.

With a population of about 21.5 million (0.3% of world population, ranking 51st globally), Australia accounts for 2.5% of the world’s energy production (world’s eighth largest producer), with coal being its main source of energy production (Coal 54%, Uranium 28%, Natural gas 10%, Oil 6% and Renewables less than 2%) . [Source: Australian Coal Association and others.]

The proposed solar-power plant network would serve to free more of the Australian coal, making it available for export. This makes perfect economic sense, especially as the price coal is expected to increase.

As for the GHG emissions from burning Australian coal, who gives a damn! No, really, since when did the Australians gave a Sydney shrimp about rest of the world, or health of the planet?

Related Links

Posted in Australian Coal export, clean energy initiative, Kramer Junction, SEGS, solar power plant | Tagged: , , , , | 10 Comments »