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Archive for the ‘food safety’ Category

Global Health Alert – Botulism: Infant Formula, Sports Drinks at Risk

Posted by feww on August 3, 2013

Botulism bacteria found in Fonterra Infant formula

Fonterra, New Zealand dairy Goliath, has announced that some of its ingredients used in infant formula and sports drinks have tested positive for a type of bacteria that could cause the potentially fatal illness botulism.

Countries most at risk could include China, South Korea, UK, France, United States, Japan, Australia and Canada, according to informed sources.

Fonterra identified a potential quality problem in March when a product tested positive for the bacteria Clostridium.

The company today warned that the bacteria had been found in 38 tons of a type of whey protein concentrate processed at its plant at Hautapu in the Waikato in May 2012, but hasn’t yet provided any detail on the customers, countries or specific products that may be tainted.

Fonterra managing director NZ Milk Products Gary Romano told reporters it was up to Fonterra’s customers, “in conjunction with their regulatory authorities, to make statements about particular consumer products,” if appropriate.

Fonterra is the world’s fourth-largest dairy company, with annual revenues of more tan $16 billion.

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

The Internet Mafia has previously censored Public Health Emergency and global health warnings posted on this blog. The cabal have blocked or buried for commercial reasons potentially life-saving alerts concerning food items originating from New Zealand, especially Fonterra milk products.

What is botulism?

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and sometimes by strains of Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii. There are five main kinds of  botulism. Foodborne botulism is caused by eating foods that contain the botulinum toxin. Wound botulism is caused by toxin produced from a wound infected with Clostridium botulinum. Infant botulism is caused by consuming the spores of the botulinum bacteria, which then grow in the intestines and release toxin. Adult intestinal toxemia (adult intestinal colonization) botulism is a very rare kind of botulism that occurs among adults by the same route as infant botulism. Lastly, iatrogenic botulism can occur from accidental overdose of botulinum toxin. All forms of botulism can be fatal and are considered medical emergencies. Foodborne botulism is a public health emergency because many people can be poisoned by eating a contaminated food. [CDC]

Clostridium botulinum bacteria -s
Clostridium botulinum
is the name of a group of bacteria. They can be found in soil, water sediment and fish. These rod-shaped organisms are anaerobic (they grow best in low oxygen conditions). The gram positive bacteria form spores (endospore forming), which allow them to survive in a dormant state until exposed to conditions that can support their growth. There are seven types of botulism toxin designated by the letters A through G; only types A, B, E and F cause illness in humans. [Source CDC and others]

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Posted in food poisoning, food recall, Food Regulations, food safety, Foodborne Illness | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments »

Mad Cow Disease Reemerges in California

Posted by feww on April 25, 2012

California dairy cow had mad cow disease

Health officials have confirmed that a dairy cow in California’s Central Valley had bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly referred to as the mad cow disease, but insist that the US beef and dairy products are safe.

  • BSE is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in cattle that can be easily passed on to humans; it has an incubation period of up to 8 year in cattle and about 12 years in humans.
  • The disease is easily transmitted to humans by eating food contaminated with the brain, spinal cord or digestive tract of infected carcasses.
  • An outbreak of BSE in the United Kingdom killed at least 166 people (an additional 50 known fatalities occurred in other countries) and about 180,000 cattle in the 1980s, and forced the authorities to destroy about 4.5 million cows at cost of more than $7 billion.
  • BSE prion is not destroyed through cooking and can be transmitted to humans who consume contaminated beef products.
  • An estimated half a million cattle infected with BSE entered the human food chain in the 1980s.
  • A second strain of BSE prion, discovered in 2004, may have also entered the food chain.
  • The diseased animal was he first confirmed case of mad cow disease in the U.S. in 6 years.
  • The first known case of BSE infection in North America was reported in Alberta, Canada in 1993.
  • South Korea has suspended sales of U.S. beef on Wednesday.

Other Global Disasters, Significant Events

  • Pennsylvania, USA.  Pennsylvania Governor has declared a statewide disaster emergency following the chaos caused by the late spring storm. Parts of western and northern Pennsylvania were paralyzed by heavy snowfall, and the rest of the State experienced heavy rain.
  • Florida, USA.  A total of  12 counties in Florida have been designated by USDA as Natural Disaster Areas due to damage and losses caused by frost and freezing temperatures that occurred January 3-16, 2012.
    • Primary natural disaster areas in Florida: Hendry, Nassau and Palm Beach counties.
    • Contiguous disaster areas: Baker, Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Duval, Glades, Lee, Martin and Okeechobee counties.
  • Georgia. Charlton and Camden counties in Georgia were also declared  natural disaster areas because they’re contiguous.

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in environment, food safety, food supply chain, foodborne disease, Foodborne infections, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S. FBI Cost $500 Per Head in Healthcare, Losses

Posted by feww on March 3, 2010

Press Release: Safe Food for a healthy Life

Foodborne Illness Costs Nation $152 Billion Annually – Nearly $39 Billion Loss Attributed to Produce

Washington DC – Acute foodborne illnesses cost the United States an estimated $152 billion per year in healthcare, workplace and other economic losses, according to a report published today by the Produce Safety Project (PSP).

The study, Health-Related Costs from Foodborne Illness in the United States, was written by Dr. Robert L. Scharff, a former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) economist and current Ohio State University assistant professor in the department of consumer sciences. The study estimates that more than a quarter of these costs, an estimated $39 billion, are attributable to foodborne illnesses associated with fresh, canned and processed produce.

The FDA has announced that it will propose before the end of the year mandatory and enforceable safety standards for the growing, harvesting and packing of fresh produce. These will be the first nationwide safety standards for fresh fruits and vegetables.

“An up-to-date cost analysis of foodborne illnesses is critical for FDA officials and lawmakers to craft the most effective and efficient reforms,” said Jim O’Hara, PSP director. “A decade ago, we spent more than $1.3 billion annually to try to reduce the burden of foodborne illness and today we are spending even more. We need to make certain we are spending limited funds wisely and hitting our target of reducing sicknesses and deaths, and this study gives us a yardstick to measure our progress.”

Produce (fresh, canned and processed) accounts for roughly 19,700,000 of the reported illnesses documented, at a cost of approximately $1,960 per case and $39 billion annually in economic losses. California, Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois and Pennsylvania were the states most impacted by foodborne illness cases related to produce.

In additional to national data, the report includes data at the state level.

“The contribution of this study is that it provides more complete estimates of the health-related cost of foodborne illness in the United States by summing both medical costs (hospital services, physician services, and drugs) and quality-of-life losses (deaths, pain, suffering, and functional disability) for each of the major pathogens associated with foodborne illness,” said Dr. Scharff. “This cost includes both expenses to the person made ill such as pain and suffering losses and costs to others in society such as outlays by insurance companies that pay medical expenses.”

Scharff based his analysis on the economic principles currently used by FDA and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) economists in their cost analyses. In addition, to account for uncertainty he utilized confidence intervals and sensitivity analysis.

The cost of foodborne illness is calculated on both an aggregate level and a pathogen-specific level. To view a full copy of the report and the state-by-state data analysis, simply visit http://www.producesafetyproject.org and click on the Health-Related Costs report.

###

http://www.producesafetyproject.org.

Interactive Map: Annual Health-Related Costs of Foodborne Illness for Each State

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Posted in FDA, food hygiene, Food Regulations, food safety, salmonella | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Calif Massive Food Recall

Posted by feww on February 14, 2010

Calif meat company recalls another 5 million lbs of beef, veal

The latest recall by the company brings its total recall to 5.8 million lbs*, USDA said.

*[The equivalent of about 94 million burgers!]

Huntington Meat Packing Inc. of Montebello, California, first recalled 864,000 lbs of beef on January 18, suspecting E.coli contamination. They have now expanded the initial recall because the beef and veal products did not follow the company’s food safety procedures, USDA said.

“The products are adulterated because the company made the products under unsanitary conditions failing to take the steps it had determined were necessary to produce safe products,” the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) reported.

The boxes of suspect meat bear “EST. 17967″ ID number marked within the USDA inspection label and were produced between January 22, 2009, and January 4, 2010. All of The boxes were reportedly shipped to distribution centers, restaurants, and hotels within the state of California.

The recall was expanded based on evidence collected in  with assistance from FSIS, USDA said.

An ongoing criminal investigation by the Office of the Inspector General has uncovered evidence indicating that the food safety records of the company were unreliable, USDA reported.


A colorized version of PHIL 7137 depicting a highly magnified scanning electron micrographic (SEM) view of a dividing Escherichia coli bacteria, clearly displaying the point at which the bacteria’s cell wall was dividing; Magnification 21674x.

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that normally colonizes the digestive tract of most warm-blooded animals, including human beings. E. coli are facultative in nature, which means that they can adapt to their environments, switching between aerobic, and anaerobic metabolic growth depending environmental stresses. One strain of E. coli, O157:H7, causes an estimated 73,000 cases of infection, and 61 deaths in the United States each year. Infection often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. Most illness has been associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Person-to-person contact in families and child care centers is also an important mode of transmission. Infection can also occur after drinking raw milk and after swimming in or drinking sewage-contaminated water. Content Providers: CDC/ Evangeline Sowers, Janice Haney Carr. Photo Date: 2005. Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr

What is Escherichia coli?

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, while others cause urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses. Still other kinds of E. coli are used as markers for water contamination—so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the water is contaminated. It does get a bit confusing—even to microbiologists.

What are Shiga toxin-producing E. coli?

Some kinds of E. coli cause disease by making a toxin called Shiga toxin. The bacteria that make these toxins are called “Shiga toxin-producing” E. coli, or STEC for short. You might hear them called verocytotoxic E. coli (VTEC) or enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC); these all refer generally to the same group of bacteria. The most commonly identified STEC in North America is E. coli O157:H7 (often shortened to E. coli O157 or even just “O157”). When you hear news reports about outbreaks of “E. coli” infections, they are usually talking about E. coli O157. (Source: CDC.)

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Posted in E coli outbreak, E.coli O157:H7, food safety, Foodborne Illness, tainted beef | Tagged: , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Beef Recall in Six States

Posted by feww on December 27, 2009

Oklahoma firm recalls 112 tons of beef products in six states

Following an outbreak of E. coli, National Steak and Poultry of Owasso, Oklahoma, said it was recalling 248,000 lbs (112,000 kg) of beef products in Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, South Dakota  and Washington state.

The company said it was recalling the meat products voluntarily and as a precautionary measure because it thought some of its beef products might be linked to a series of E. coli outbreaks in those states.

Although the company refused to confirm any contamination had occurred at its production facilities, it said they “will err on the side of being cautious” by recalling the products.

“This is the first recall in our company’s nearly 30-year history,” the firm said in a recorded message on a consumer helpline.

National Steak and Poultry of Owasso package frozen beef and poultry, marinated beef and poultry products as well as fully cooked meats.

Ecoli bacteria
An image of E.coli bacteria provided by the USDA. The bacteria can cause diarrhea, dehydration, kidney failure and death.The Agriculture Department, which oversees meat safety in the US, said it concluded  “there is an association between the fresh ground beef products and illnesses in Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts,” after a cluster of food-borne illnesses in New England was reported, and a New Hampshire resident had died consuming ground beef that may have been infected with the deadly E. coli bacteria. More images

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a physician.

SAFE PREPARATION OF FRESH AND FROZEN GROUND BEEF

From: USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline

  • Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.
  • Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.
  • Consumers should only eat ground beef or ground beef patties that have been cooked to a safe internal temperature of 160° F, whether prepared from fresh or frozen raw meat products.
  • Color is NOT a reliable indicator that ground beef or ground beef patties have been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7.
  • The only way to be sure ground beef is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature.
  • Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90° F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking

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Posted in E coli outbreak, E.coli O157:H7, food safety, Foodborne Illness, tainted beef | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Peanut Corp of America widens salmonella recall

Posted by feww on January 29, 2009

[8 years and at least 12 cases of salmonella infected peanut butter later] FDA inspectors discover more strains of salmonella at the Georgia plant in the center of salmonella poisoning

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday said Peanut Corp of America would expand its recall to include all peanut products produced at its Blakely, Georgia plant since January 1, 2007, after FDA inspectors discovered more strains of salmonella at the plant.

salmonella-bacteria-cdc
Colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Gram-negative bacilli, or rod-shaped Salmonella sp. The genus Salmonella is a member of the taxonomic family, Enterobacteriaceae, and approximately 2000 serotypes of this genis are known to cause disease in human beings. Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr/CDC

Case count is 501 in 43 states with latest confirmed, reported illness beginning on January 8, 2009, CDC said.

“These additional products are being recalled because there is concern of potential salmonella contamination, including contamination with salmonella strains not associated with the current outbreak,” Stephen Sundlof, director of the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition said.

typhimurium_012609

Persons Infected with the Outbreak Strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, United States, by State, September 1, 2008 to January 25, 2009. Image: CDC

Sundlof stressed, however, that so far the only illnesses linked to salmonella poisoning in peanut products was caused by Salmonella Typhimurium strain.

“CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and FDA will continue to monitor incidents of salmonella illness throughout the country,” he said.

typhimurium_epi_012609

“Sundlof said the expanded recall now includes all peanuts [dry and roasted ,] granulated peanuts, peanut meal, peanut butter and peanut paste made at the Blakely, Georgia facility, which has stopped production of all products. Reuters reported.

FDA officials don’t know how many more products will be included in the widened recall. Check their website at http:/www.fda.gov for updates.

The recall so far includes about 200 products in the United States, Canada and Britain, from crackers to dog treats. Reuters said.

Click to Search for Peanut Butter Product Recalls

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Posted in CDC, food safety, Peanut Butter Products, Peanut Corp of America, Salmonella infection | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

Biotoxin Bulletin – Imported NZ Food Alert

Posted by feww on January 7, 2009

Do NOT Consume or Import New Zealand Shellfish

Toxic shellfish from New Zealand can cause paralysis and respiratory failure within 12 hours of being consumed

Public Medical Officer of Health in New Zealand reported that levels of paralytic shellfish poison were “particularly high” along the eastern coastline of New Zealand and urged people  to avoid shellfish from the area. Source

Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (“red tide”)

Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a serious illness caused by eating shellfish contaminated with algae that contains a toxin harmful to humans. When this algae increase to high numbers in marine waters, the condition is sometimes (and somewhat erroneously) referred to as a “red tide”.

Which seafood can transmit PSP to humans?

All molluscan shellfish including clams, mussels, oysters, geoduck and scallops can have paralytic shellfish poison. Moon snails and other gastropods also can become toxic. Other marine species, such as sea cucumbers, might also be affected. Crabmeat is not known to contain the PSP toxin, but the guts can contain unsafe levels. To be safe, clean crab thoroughly and discard the guts.

Who is most at risk?

Anyone who eats PSP contaminated shellfish is at risk for illness or death.

What are the symptoms of PSP?

Early symptoms include tingling of the lips and tongue, which may begin within minutes of eating poisonous shellfish or may take an hour or two to develop. Depending upon the amount of toxin a person has ingested, symptoms may progress to tingling of fingers and toes and then loss of control of arms and legs, followed by difficulty in breathing. Some people have experienced a sense of floating or nausea. If a person consumes enough poison, muscles of the chest and abdomen become paralyzed. Death can result in as little as two hours, as muscles used for breathing become paralyzed.

Does cooking the shellfish make it safe to eat?

No. The poison is not destroyed by cooking or freezing.

What should I do if I think that I, or someone in my family, has paralytic shellfish poisoning?

If symptoms are mild, call your health care provider and your local public health agency. If symptoms are severe, call 911 or have someone take you to the emergency room.

Where can I get more information?

Call the Washington State Department of Health’s Office of Shellfish and Water Protection at (360) 236-3330 or the Marine Biotoxin Hotline at 1-800-562-5632.

Source

Warning! Eating shellfish contaminated with marine biotoxin can kill you.

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Posted in clams, food safety, oysters, paralysis, Water Protection | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Imported Food Alert 22 Oct 2008

Posted by feww on October 22, 2008

This information comes from:

New Zealand Health Alert Bulletin # 22. E.coli found in NZ milk, and listeria in yogurt products

for more details go to:

NZ Visitor Warning: E.coli detected in milk, listeria in yogurt

The E. coli strain serotype O157:H7 can cause serious food poisoning in humans.


Low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times. Each individual bacterium is oblong shaped. Photo by Eric Erbe, digital colorization by Christopher Pooley, both of USDA, ARS, EMU.

Listeria monocytogenes


Source: Bacterial Meningitis. Image may be subject to copyright.

“Group B Streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes are the most common causes of meningitis in neonatals. In the United States, about 17,500 cases of bacterial meningitis are reported annually.”

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Posted in Bacterial Meningitis, contaminated milk, food safety, new zealand, yogurt products | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

Taiwan Cares about Citizens, China Doesn’t!

Posted by feww on September 30, 2008

Taiwan demands apology, compensation from China over tainted milk

Taipei – Taiwan Premier Liu Chao-hsuan told parliament on Tuesday that he demanded an apology and compensation as appropriate from China over tainted milk import.

“Hereby, I make a formal request to demand China apologize to Taiwan … Departments concerned will have calculate the damages caused within a week. Once the damages are confirmed, we will help seek compensation from China,” he said.


A 6x8mm Kidney Stone. Credit: Robert R. Wal

Five Taiwanese children have reportedly developed kidney stones after drinking tainted Chinese milk powder, and the food industry has incurred substantial losses due to product recalls.

A Taiwanese delegation that visited China last weekend to probe the tainted milk scandal, expressed concerns about the safety of imported food from China.

Beijing and Taipei subsequently agreed to cooperate closely on food safety issues. (Source)

Will China Prosecute Sanlu-Fonterra Directors and Executives for Corporate Manslaughter?

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FEWW

Posted in China Food Import, Fonterra, food safety, kidney stones, Sanlu | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Sanlu Was First Banned in 2004, then Reinstated

Posted by feww on September 23, 2008

Why Both Fonterra & NZ Govt Must Have Known About Tainted Baby Formula Long Before Their  Corporate Manslaughter Case

The following article, which is reprinted in full in view of public interest, is another damning testimony why both Fonterra and New Zealand Government must have known about Sanlu tainted milk practice by as early as December 2004.

Tainted Milk Powder Banned Four Years Ago – But back on shelf with authorities’ backup

Sep 21, 2008 (Last Updated: Sep 22, 2008) -

http://en.epochtimes.com/n2/china/tainted-milk-four-years-ago-4573.html

By Xin Fei
Epoch Times Staff

Turn Crisis into Turning Point ((Screenshot))

The reprint of communist regime’s mouthpiece Xinhua News by China Pharmaceutical News on December 7, 2004, 'Sanlu Powdered Milk: Turn Crisis into Turning Point' ((Screenshot))

Deception that began four years ago continues, as the furore of tainted powdered milk causing kidney stones in babies spreads throughout China.

The public learned, earlier this month, that milk powder tainted with melamine has been found to be the cause of kidney stones in infants across China. At least four babies have died as a result.

In an incident four years ago, following the “Big Head Baby” media report in Fuyang City, Anhui Province, Sanlu’s powdered milk had been blacklisted as inferior.

Shortly after, Sanlu was removed from the blacklist, by the communist regime’s food administration, and reinstated.

Many people in Fuyang, knowing that Sanlu powdered milk had quality problems, suspected the company of manipulating the local and central government officials and using the Chinese state media in efforts to restore its reputation.

Media Reports Indicated No Crisis

A December 7, 2004 reprint of state-run Xinhua news by China Pharmaceutical News headline reading: ‘Sanlu Powdered Milk: Turn Crisis into an Advantage’ provided a clue that the group was aware the powdered milk had been tainted.

On January 16, 2004, Zhang Guangkui of Yongzhuang Village, Luzhai Town, Linquan County, Fuyang City, Anhui Province complained that the Sanlu infant powdered milk formula that he bought was tainted.

On April 22, the front page of local Fuyang newpaper Yingzhou Evening News printed a list of tainted powdered milk brands resulting from the spot check. Sanlu infant milk formula was 32nd on the list.

On the same day, Sanlu Group deputy general manager Zhang Zhenling and other high level staff members hurried to Fuyang City to negotiate with the local government. A statement said:  “ … a mistake was made by related workers” and Fuyang City apologized.

A few days after April 22, 2004, markets all over the country were compelled to remove and seal Sanlu’s powdered milk.

Sanlu’s sales fell, its losses exceeded tens of millions RMB (around US$10 million).

On April 26, the Ministry of Public Health, State Administration for Industry and Commerce, General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) issued an emergency notice requesting local law-enforcing departments to allow normal sales of Sanlu powdered milk.

On the first working day after the “May 1” seven-day-long holidays that year, AQSIQ announced that as a result of a spot check, 30 companies producing powdered milk had been declared as safe.

Sanlu was the first one on the list.

Public Relations Crisis Management Efforts

According to a Xinhua News report in 2004, on April 27, Sanlu and several dozen dairy enterprises conducted good faith symposiums in several cities. The theme was  ‘Resisting Killer Powdered Milk’.

They jointly released the first ‘Dairy Business Good Faith Pledge’ in the country, firmly promising not to produce or sell inferior quality dairy products.

Within one day, Sanlu had notified 93 media nationwide, and 19 media removed Sanlu powdered milk from their blacklist reports.

On April 28, 2004, organized by Specific Association for Child Food, Chinese Society for Food Science and Technology, Sanlu and nine food security trusts donated 4,985 boxes of infant powdered milk to Fuyang City in an experimental bid for commercial enterprises.

After these events, in many business strategy documents and articles, Sanlu was used as model for managing crisis successfully.

In September 2008, when poisonous Sanlu powdered milk was first exposed, Sanlu vigorously denied any contamination in the powdered milk and attempted to redeem itself by citing conclusions given by the authoritative quality examination departments.

According to Tencent QQ financial channel report on September 11, Sanlu Group media department indicated;

“Sanlu is a brand product of powdered milk, the production is strictly in accordance with national standards and the product is qualified. Currently, there is no evidence indicating illness caused by Sanlu powdered milk.”

Since the incident came to light last week, the Sanlu Group has continued to gloss over it and deny involvement, while passing the blame onto dairy farmers.

As pressure increases domestically and internationally, the communist regime’s officials, at all levels, have ducked for cover saying that Sanlu knew the facts all along but failed to file a report.  Copyright the author or respective news agency. [Emphasis are added by FEWW]

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Posted in China, food safety, Helen Clark, new zealand | Tagged: , , , , | 9 Comments »

Breaking News: China Deadly Milk Scandal Deepens

Posted by terres on September 19, 2008

Update Sept 22-08: Sanlu Was First Banned in 2004, then Reinstated

China Finds Liquid Milk Also Tainted

First melamine-tainted milk powder, now melamine-tainted ‘fresh’ milk, too!

Chinese inspectors said they found 10% of the milk from the country’s two largest dairies, Mengniu Dairy Group and Yili Industrial Group, contained up to 8.4 milligrams of melamine per kg.

This news came amid deepening tainted powdered milk scandal which has already killed 4 babies and claimed up to 7,000 infant victims with kidney stones, including at least 150 babies with acute kidney failures.  Sources:      VideoBBC; AP


Parents and their infants queue for medical treatment at the Children’s Hospital of Zhengzhou in Zhengzhou, capital of central China’s Henan Province, Sept. 17, 2008.  4 Infants have already died and up to 7,000 developed kidney stones, 150 of them with actue kidney failures, drinking Sanlu-Fonterra tainted baby milk powder. The chemical melamine was added to the milk as it was believed to have helped to increase protein content. (Xinhua/Zhao Peng)
.

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Fonterra had Foreknowledge

Truth About New Zealand

Posted in China, food safety, kidney stones | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

E. coli O157:H7 Again? AGAIN?

Posted by feww on November 26, 2007

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause both intestinal infections such as bloody diarrhea, and extra-intestinal infections such as urinary tract infections, meningitis, peritonitis, mastitis, septicemia and Gram-negative pneumonia. Children, elderly and people with compromised immune systems are the most susceptible to E. coli.

“GREEN BAY, Wis. – A company voluntarily recalled nearly 96,000 pounds of ground beef products after two people were sickened, possibly by the E. coli bacteria, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said Saturday.

“The beef products by American Foods Group include coarse and fine ground beef chuck, sirloin and chop beef. They were distributed to retailers and distributors in Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Tennessee, Wisconsin and Virginia.” Read more …

Previous entry: E. coli O157:H7, Again?

Posted in diet, food safety, health, meat | Leave a Comment »

 
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