Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Archive for the ‘fumarolic activity’ Category

Volcano Watch: 17 February 2009

Posted by msrb on February 19, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 11 February – 17 February 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Volcano of the Week: Ebeko

Country:    Russia
Region   :    Kuril Islands

Volcano Type:     Somma volcano
Last Known Eruption:     2005
Summit Elevation:   1,156 m     (3,793 feet)
Latitude:     50.68°N     (50°41’0″N)
Longitude:     156.02°E    (156°1’0″)


An ash-bearing eruption column rises above the North crater of Ebeko volcano on September 9, 1989. An explosive eruption that began on February 2, 1989 continued until April 1990. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, which occupies the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones at the northern end of Paramushir Island. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Photo courtesy of Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team, 1989. Caption: GVP

The Tokyo VAAC reported an ash plume which drifted NE from Ebeko at an altitude of 0.6 km. Another ash plume was detected drifting SW at an altitude of 1.2 km ft.

Geologic Summary. The flat-topped summit of the central cone of Ebeko volcano, one of the most active in the Kuril Islands, occupies the northern end of Paramushir Island. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, at the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones. The eastern part of the southern crater of Ebeko contains strong solfataras and a large boiling spring. The central crater of Ebeko is filled by a lake about 20 m deep whose shores are lined with steaming solfataras; the northern crater lies across a narrow, low barrier from the central crater and contains a small, cold crescentic lake. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Intense fumarolic activity occurs in the summit craters of Ebeko, on the outer flanks of the cone, and in lateral explosion craters. GVP

Ongoing Activity:

Posted in Arenal, fumarolic activity, Kamchatka, Paramushir Island, Shishaldin | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Tonga’s Metis Shoal may be erupting

Posted by feww on February 3, 2009

Metis Shoal Submarine Volcano May Be Erupting

1. FEWW seismic analysis of Tonga Islands region in south Pacific Ocean (SPO) indicate that Metis Shoal, a submarine volcano located midway between the islands of Kao and Late (about 50 km NNE of Kao), may be about to erupt, or is currently undergoing a period of unrest.

2. Metis Shoal’s last known eruption occurred in 1995, which produced an island with a diameter of about 300 m and a height of 43 m after a solid lava dome was formed above the surface of water in SPO.

3. Since 1851 some 8 episodes of unrest have been recorded. In three, possibly five, of those occasions new islands were created (1858, 1967-68, 1979, 1995).

Metis Shoal

  • Country:  Tonga
  • Region:  Tonga Islands, SPO
  • Volcano Type:  Submarine volcano
  • Last Known Eruption:  1995
  • Summit Elevation:  43 m asl
  • Latitude: 19.18°S   19°11’0″S
  • Longitude:  174.87°W   174°52’0″W

4. Metis Shoal, a submarine volcano midway between the islands of Kao and Late, has produced a series of ephemeral islands since the first confirmed activity in the mid-19th century. An island, perhaps not in eruption, was reported in 1781 and subsequently was eroded away. During periods of inactivity following 20th-century eruptions, waves have been observed to break on rocky reefs or sandy banks with depths of 10 m or less. Dacitic tuff cones formed during the first 20th-century eruptions in 1967 and 1979 were soon eroded beneath the sea surface. An eruption in 1995 produced an island with a diameter of 280 m and a height of 43 m following growth of a lava dome above the surface. [Caption: GVP]


5. Waves break over Metis Shoal on February 19, 1968, more than a month after the end of a submarine eruption that began in December 1967 and produced an ephemeral island. Metis Shoal has produced a series of small islands during eruptions observed since the mid-19th century. Most recently, an eruption in 1995 produced a lava dome that built up to 43 m above sea level. Photo by Charles Lundquist, 1968 (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory). Caption: GVP


6. Map of the Tonga Islands, showing the island groups and location of Metis Shoal, which re-emerged as an island in June 1995. Source: GVP

Other Photos of Metis Shoal


7. Metis Shoal, sea level view. Source: MTU


8. Metis shoal, aerial view. Source: MTU


9. Metis Shoal aerial photo dated December 7,  2006. Source: GVP

Related Links:

Content of this post: 424 words, 9 paras/captions, 5 images, 1 list w/9 bullets

Posted in fumarolic activity, Submarine eruption, tephra, volcanic unrest, volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

Redoubt’s ‘Phantom Unrest’ Could Lead to Eruption

Posted by msrb on October 4, 2008

Alaska Volcano Observatory

Information Statement – Friday, October 3, 2008 10:37 AM AKDT (10:37 UTC)

Redoubt Volcano

  • Type of Volcano: Stratovolcano
  • Coordinates: 60°29’7″ N 152°44’38” W
  • Summit Elevation: 10197 ft (3108 m)
  • Recent Eruptions:1902, 1966-68, and 1989-90
  • Location: Western side of Cook Inlet, about 170 km southwest of Anchorage and 82 km east of Kenai, Alaska
  • Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL

Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN


Annotated photo of Redoubt Volcano from the north, including features seen on 27 September, 2008.
Picture Date: September 27, 2008 – Image Creator: Kate Bull – Image courtesy of the AVO/ADGGS.
Full Size

What’s up at Redoubt?

Starting September 16, reports of strong hydrogen sulfide odor and loud noises coming from the direction of the volcano were reported. AVO observation flight on September 27 revealed:

  • A number of fractures and circular openings in the upper Drift glacier for the first time.
  • Scientist noted a strong hydrogen sulfide odor, but onboard instrumentation recorded no sulfur dioxide.
  • Fumaroles on top of  domes formed in the 1968 and 1990 eruptions showed more vigorous steaming than the last observation in mid-August.
  • AVO’s seismic network detected no abnormal earthquake activity, despite the earlier reports.

AVO believes Redoubt’s increased fumarolic activity and presence of sulfur odors do not suggest an imminent eruption, despite similar observations being made in the  months preceding the 1989-1990 eruption, when seismicity also increased significantly. AVO expects a similar strong increase in seismicity first before an eruption occurs.

Notes:

In the 1989-90 eruption lahar traveling down the Drift River partially inundated the Drift River Oil Terminal facility. Ash plumes produced during the same eruption affected international air traffic with traces of ashfall falling on Anchorage and nearby communities. (AVO)

Posted in Drift glacier, Drift River, Drift River Oil, fumarolic activity, Seismicity | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »