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Archive for the ‘God particle’ Category

LHC IS FAULTY

Posted by feww on March 10, 2010

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Construction Flawed: Director

Dr Steve Myers LHC cannot be operated at full  potential for [at least] two years.

In September 2008 after about 100 of the LHC’s super-cooled magnets heated up to more than 100°C, the system was shut down. It took 14 months to repair.

Soon the machine must close down again for about a year to make the tunnel safe for high energy proton collisions.

“It’s something that, with a lot more resources and with a lot more manpower and quality control, possibly could have been avoided but I have difficulty in thinking that this is something that was a design error.” Myers said, BBC reported.

“The standard phrase is that the LHC is its own prototype. We are pushing technologies towards their limits.” He added.

“You don’t hear about the thousands or hundreds of thousands of other areas that have gone incredibly well. [REALLY?]

“With a machine like the LHC, you only build one and you only build it once.”

The $10 to $14 billion “White Elephant” is buried up to 100m below the French-Swiss border region.

Must Read Background:

Posted in big bang, cosmic radiation, God particle, Over engineered, Rube Goldberg | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

NO Big Bang, not even a little one, for 6 months!

Posted by terres on September 24, 2008

LHC Update:
Our good Professor Peter Higgs will have to find another way of communicating with the “Almighty!”

As the Moderators previously anticipated, there won’t be a big bang, not even a tiny one, for at least another 6 months at CERN’s “Champaign Science Center” the LHC.

It is highly probable that LHC may not be fully operational before 2010.


One of 1,746 helium-cooled superconducting magnets is lowered into the LHC tunnel via a specially constructed hatch in April 2007. The 17-meter long dipole magnet, one of 1,232 dipoles positioned around the LHC, is designed to produce a magnetic field that bends the particle beams around the circular path of the accelerator. [About 100 of these magnet overheated to more than 100ºC —possibly to several hundred degrees—frying the wiring, when liquid helium leaked out of the vacuum cooling system.] Photo by Maximilien Brice for CERN. Source: CNET

And who knows what surprises might be lurking around the LHC’s 27-km tunnel in 2009!

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Posted in big bang, God particle, Science & Tech, wasteful technology | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

LHC: What will it do after the bang?

Posted by msrb on September 10, 2008

Astronomical Cost of LHC Reminds You of ISS

When the Scientists take the taxpayers to the cleaners

LHC has so far cost an estimated $10billion to build, while its annual operating cost remains a “secret.” FEWW Moderators believe the philosophy, direction and reasons for creating this white [super] elephant are entirely misplaced.

On a planet whose ability to support life is eroding daily, caused by the human onslaught on her ecosystems, and where the probability of finding any named living individual being still alive in a few years time is truly minuscule, the $10billion could have been better invested to:

  • Conduct research into low-energy technology in air quality improvement, water purification, food production, clean energy, health and hygiene, learning and education, sustainable living … and communication sectors.
  • Create working blueprints for low-energy, low-impact intelligent communities, providing about 1,500,000 people with a realistic chance of crossing the precarious “life bridge” into a possible future.

Bang for the Buck [readers will excuse the unintended pun]

The LHC project is inappropriate, ill-timed, unnecessary and hideously expensive!

Never mind the Big Bang simulation. The LHC’s poorly conceived philosophy would provide the tiniest, one-time, damp squib for your buck. The minuscule return on the enormous investment, the amount of [useful] science received for the cost of building and operating the project, makes LHC stand out like a giant white European elephant on the France’s border with Switzerland. The scientific payoff of LHC will not come even close to that of its orbiting uncle, the multi-billion dollar public-financed space science project black hole, aka the International Space Station (ISS).

And what exactly has NASA got to show for the ISS since 1998 when its on-orbit assembly began?
To be precise, NOT much!

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A simulated event at the CMS particle detector of the LHC, CERN, Switzerland. The simulation depicts the decay of a Higgs particle following a collision of two protons.

LHC
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest particle accelerator complex, intended to collide opposing beams of 7 TeV protons. Its main purpose is to explore the validity and limitations of the Standard Model, the current theoretical picture for particle physics. The LHC was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and lies under the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. More …

When activated, it is theorized that the collider will produce the elusive Higgs boson, the observation of which could confirm the predictions and missing links in the Standard Model of physics and could explain how other elementary particles acquire properties such as mass. More …

Posted in Astronomical Cost of LHC, big bang, God particle, Higgs boson, LHC, space shuttle | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

God Particle

Posted by feww on April 10, 2008

Updates:

Physicist says “God particle” will be found soon

Peter Higgs, a British physicist, believes scientists can soon prove the existence of a force which gives mass to the universe and makes life possible, a theory he first published 40 years ago.

Higgs, 78, believes a particle called the “Higgs boson” [nicknamed the “God particle” much to his chagrin as he is an atheist] will be found when a vast particle collider at the CERN research center in Switzerland kicks into full gear early 2009.

“The likelihood is that the particle will show up pretty quickly … I’m more than 90 percent certain that it will,” Higgs told reporters.

In the 1960s, the scientists at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) had dismissed Higgs’s theory, which explained why the force, named the Higgs field, must exist.

Today, the scientists widely accept the existence of the invisible field, which they believe came into being several milliseconds after the Big Bang created the universe about 13.73 billion years ago [the age of universe has an uncertainty of about 120 million years.]

Ordinary matter in our universe is made up of atoms. Each atom includes a nucleus composed of protons and neutrons, surrounded by a cloud of electrons. Protons and neutrons are in turn made of quarks, which are bound together by other particles called gluons. The bounds are so strong they have prevented quarks from existing on their own since just after big bang.

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will simulate conditions at the time of big bang. Particles colliding at near light speed will generate temperatures 100,000 times hotter than the sun, which would melt protons and neutrons, breaking the quark-gluon bonds and creating a state of matter called quark-gluon plasma. The project collaborators hope that by studying the quark-gluon plasma, as it expands and cools, they can uncover the mysteries of universe.

Higgs, who taught at Scotland’s Edinburgh University, postulated that matter was weightless at the exact moment of the Big Bang, but most of it quickly gained mass because of the presence of a field that combined with the particles as they passed through it.


LHC Particle Collider at CERN. Image may be copyrighted. See FEWW Fair Use Notice.
CERN is currently building the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC. This massive collider is being installed in a tunnel 27 km in circumference. CERN claims by studying collisions at very high energies its physicists could make progress in understanding the mysteries of how universe was born.

It is not known how long it might take to analyze the big bang simulation data, despite using bleeding edge supercomputers, before any evidence of the god particle could be found.

“I may have to keep the champagne on ice for a while yet.” Said Higgs.

“It all happens so fast that the appearance of the boson may be hidden in the data collected, and it could take a long time for the analysis to find it,” said Higgs. “If it doesn’t,” he said, “I shall be very, very puzzled.” Report

Cost of LHC Project: About $10 billion.

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Posted in God particle, invisible field, light speed, mysteries, Nuclear Research, Peter Higgs | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »