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Archive for the ‘Koryaksky’ Category

VolcanoWatch Weekly [2 September 2009]

Posted by feww on September 5, 2009

Supervolcanoes may awaken

VOW: Mt Tambora

Mt tambora indonesia
Photo: Mark Webster/Lonely Planet Images. Image may be subject to copyright.

Tambora Photo
Country:    Indonesia
Region:    Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)
Volcano Type:     Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption:     1967 ± 20 years
Summit Elevation:     2,850 m     (9,350 feet)
Latitude:     8.25°S
Longitude:     118.00°E
Source: GVP


Tambora volcano on Indonesia’s Sumbawa Island was the site of the world’s largest historical eruption in April 1815. This NASA Landsat mosaic shows the 6-km-wide caldera truncating the 2850-m-high summit of the massive volcano. Pyroclastic flows during the 1815 eruption reached the sea on all sides of the 60-km-wide volcanic peninsula, and the ejection of large amounts of tephra caused world-wide temperature declines in 1815 and 1816. NASA Landsat7 image (worldwind.arc.nasa.gov). Caption GVP.

Mount Tambora (or Tomboro) is an active stratovolcano on Sumbawa island, Indonesia. Sumbawa is flanked both to the north and south by oceanic crust, and Tambora was formed by the active subduction zones beneath it. This raised Mount Tambora as high as 4,300 m (14,000 ft), making it one of the tallest peaks in the Indonesian archipelago.

Tambora erupted in 1815 with a rating of seven on the Volcanic Explosivity Index, making it the largest eruption since the Lake Taupo eruption in about 180 AD. It was the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history. The explosion was heard on Sumatra island (more than 2,000 km  away). Heavy volcanic ash falls were observed as far away as Borneo, Sulawesi, Java and Maluku islands. Most deaths from the eruption were from starvation and disease, as the eruptive fallout ruined agricultural productivity in the local region. The death toll was at least 71,000 people (perhaps the most deadly eruption in history), of whom 11,000–12,000 were killed directly by the eruption. The eruption created global climate anomalies; 1816 became known as the Year Without Summer because of the effect on North American and European weather. Agricultural crops failed and livestock died in much of the Northern Hemisphere, resulting in the worst famine of the 19th century. (Source: Wikipedia; edited by FEWW)

SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(26 August-1 September 2009)

New activity/unrest:

  • Kanlaon, Negros Island (central Philippines)
  • Kolokol Group, Urup Island  (Kurile Islands,Sakhalin Oblast region, Russia)
  • Koryaksky, Eastern Kamchatka, Russia

Ongoing Activity:

Related Links:

FEWW Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Posted in Chaiten, Kanlaon, Kolokol Group, Koryaksky, Kīlauea, Popocatépetl, Shiveluch | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Volcano Watch Weekly: 23 April 2009

Posted by feww on April 23, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 15 April – 21 April 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

  • Ebeko, Paramushir Island  (Russia)
  • Fernandina, Galápagos Islands  (Ecuador)
  • Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • NW Rota-1, Mariana Islands (Central Pacific)
  • Pagan, Mariana Islands (Central Pacific)
  • Paluweh, Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)

VoW: Shasta

Volcano: Mount Shasta
Location: Siskiyou County, California
Latitude: 41.40 N
Longitude: 122.18 W
Height: 4,317 Meters  (14,161 Feet)
Type: Stratovolcano
Composition: Silicic andesite to dacite
Source: USGS (Cascades Volcano Observatory)


Mount Shasta and Shastina, California. USGS Photograph taken by Lyn Topinka, 1984 .

From: Miller, 1980, Potential Hazards from Future Eruptions in the Vicinity of Mount Shasta Volcano, Northern California: USGS Bulletin 1503

Mount Shasta is located in the Cascade Range in northern California about 65 kilometers (40 miles) south of the Oregon-California border and about midway between the Pacific Coast and the Nevada border. One of the largest and highest of the Cascade volcanoes, snowclad Mount Shasta is near the southern end of the range that terminates near Lassen Peak. Mount Shasta is a massive compound stratovolcano composed of overlapping cones centered at four or more main vents; it was constructed during a period of more than 100,000 years. … Two of the main eruptive centers at Mount Shasta, the Shastina and Hotlum cones were constructed during Holocene time, which includes about the last 10,000 years.

For more information including eruptive history and probable future potential hazard see: Mount Shasta and Vicinity, California


The most voluminous of the Cascade volcanoes, northern California’s Mount Shasta is a massive compound stratovolcano composed of at least four main edifices constructed over a period of at least 590,000 years.
Roughly 46 cu km of an ancestral Shasta volcano was destroyed by one of Earth’s largest known Quaternary subaerial hummocky debris avalanches, which filled the Shasta River valley NW of the volcano about 350,000 year ago.  The Hotlum cone, forming the present summit, and the Shastina lava dome complex were constructed during the early Holocene, as was the SW flank Black Butte lava dome. Eruptions from these vents have produced pyroclastic flows and mudflows that affected areas as far as 20 km from the summit. Eruptions from Hotlum cone continued throughout the Holocene. Shasta’s only historical eruption was observed from the ship of the explorer La Perouse off the California coast in 1786.  Photo by Dave Wieprecht, 1995 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP


The deposits of an exceptionally large debris avalanche extend from the base of Mount Shasta volcano northward across the floor of Shasta Valley in northern California. The debris-avalanche deposits underlie an area of about 675 square kilometers, and their estimated volume is at least 45 cubic kilometers. Radiometric limiting dates suggest that the debris avalanche occurred between about 300,000 and 380,000 years ago. Hundreds of mounds, hills, and ridges formed by the avalanche deposits are separated by flat areas that slope generally northward at about 5 meters per kilometer. The hills and ridges are formed by the block facies of the deposits, which includes masses of andesite lava tens to hundreds of meters across as well as stratigraphic successions of unconsolidated deposits of pyroclastic flows, lahars, air-fall tephra, and alluvium, which were carried intact within the debris avalanche. The northern terminus of the block facies is near Montague, at a distance of about 49 kilometers from the present summit of the volcano. The flat areas between hills and ridges are underlain by the matrix facies, which is an unsorted and unstratified mudflowlike deposit of sand, silt, clay, and rock fragments derived chiefly from the volcano. Boulders of volcanic rock from Mount Shasta are scattered along the west side of Shasta Valley and in the part of Shasta Valley that lies north of Montague, at heights of as much as 100 meters above the adjacent surface of the debris-avalanche deposits. The boulders represent a lag that was formed after the main body of the avalanche came to rest, when much of the still-fluid matrix facies drained away and flowed out of Shasta Valley down the Shasta River valley and into the Klamath River. About 300 years ago, three rockfall-debris avalanches occurred from domes at the Chaos Crags eruptive center near Lassen Peak. The Chaos Crags avalanches traveled as far as 4.3 kilometers from their source areas. USGS Photograph taken September 22, 1982, by Harry Glicken. Caption: CVO


Mount Shasta, California Debris Avalanche Deposit. Source: USGS – CVO

Ongoing Activity:


FEWW Volcanic Forecast:

(see: Sumatra’s Mt Kerinci Erupts )

1. The Loyalty – New Hebrides  Arc Collision. Intense volcanic activity should be expected throughout 2009 and beyond along the New Hebrides arc, the Vanatu region (also to the north to include Solomon Island and Santa Cruz Island), possibly continued along the New Hebrides Trench (to include Matthew and Hunter Island). Volcanoes that are located in the above-described area include:

  • Savo (Solomon Island)
  • Tinakula (Santa Cruz Island – SW Pacific)
  • Suretamatai
  • Motlav
  • Gaua
  • Mere Lava
  • Aoba
  • Ambrym
  • Lopevi
  • Kuwae
  • North Vate
  • Traitor’s Head
  • Yasur
  • Eastern Gemini Seamount
  • Matthew Island
  • Hunter Island

2. Pacific Plate subduction beneath the Okhotsk Plate. Subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Okhotsk Plate continues to create Intense volcanism. Starting 2009, however, a much greater than the average number of volcanoes located on the Kuril Islands island arc, Kamchatka volcanic arc and Japan trench to the south may erupt with renewed intensity.

Related Link and FEWW previous forecasts:

Posted in Chaiten, Galapagos Islands, Koryaksky, volcanic activity, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Weekly Volcano Watch: 12 March 2009

Posted by feww on March 12, 2009

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Thursday, Mar 5, 2009 at 06:40:05 PST

  • 2009-03-11 20:27:47 Okmok Advisory Yellow
  • 2009-03-11 20:27:47 Redoubt Advisory Yellow
  • 2009-03-11 20:27:47 Cleveland Advisory Yellow
  • 2009-03-11 20:07:45 Kilauea Watch Orange
  • 2009-03-03 01:05:40 Mauna Loa Advisory Yellow

Volcano Hazards Program Webcams page links to webcams at 19 of the 169 active volcanoes in the U-S.

Volcanic Activity Report: 4 March – 10 March 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Rainier


Mount Rainier, at 4392 m the highest peak in the Cascade Range, forms a dramatic backdrop to the Puget Sound region. Large Holocene mudflows from collapse of this massive, heavily glaciated andesitic volcano have reached as far as the Puget Sound lowlands. The present summit was constructed within a large crater breached to the north during the a mid-Holocene eruption as a result of the collapse of a once-higher edifice. Several postglacial tephras have been erupted from Mount Rainier; tree-ring dating places the last recognizable tephra deposit during the 19th century. The present-day summit cone was formed during a major mixed-magma explosive eruption about 2200 years ago and is capped by two overlapping craters. Extensive hydrothermal alteration of the upper portion of the volcano has contributed to its structural weakness; an active thermal system has caused periodic melting on flank glaciers and produced an elaborate system of steam caves in the summit icecap.
Photo by Lee Siebert, 1983 (Smithsonian Institution). Caption: GVP

  • Country: United States
  • Region: Washington
  • Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
  • Last Known Eruption: 1894
  • Summit Elevation: 4392 m (14,409 feet)
  • Latitude: 46.853°N (46°51’10″N)
  • Longitude: 121.760°W ( 121°45’37″W)

Seattle_Rainier
Mount Rainier photographed from Seattle, WA. Photo dated July 2005. Source. Image may be subject to copyright.

Monthly report (subject to change) from

06/1969 (CSLP 53-69) Increased seismicity since September 1968

“Local activity has been increasing each month for the last three months. We have been averaging about 1-3 ‘Mt. Ranier Events’ per 5-day period with an increase to about five per 5-day period last September 1968. This April, the events increased to approximately five per 5-day period. In May, it increased to about six per 5-day period and as of 15 June the increase is to approximately 12 per 5-day period.”

Information Contact: N. Rasmussen, Seismology Station, University of Washington.

Cascade Range Current Update

CASCADES VOLCANO OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
Friday, March 6, 2009 09:05 PST (Friday, March 6, 2009 17:05 UTC)

Source: USGS/Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Washington

Cascade Range Volcanoes
Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Activity Update: All volcanoes in the Cascade Range are at normal levels of background seismicity. These include Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Adams in Washington State; Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Three Sisters, Newberry Volcano, and Crater Lake, in Oregon; and Medicine Lake volcano, Mount Shasta, and Lassen Peak in northern California.
Mount St. Helens has been at Volcano Alert Level NORMAL (Aviation Color Code GREEN) since July 10, 2008.

Recent Observations: Activity at all Cascade volcanoes remained at background levels. A few tiny earthquakes were detected at Mount St. Helens and Mount Shasta.

The U.S. Geological Survey and University of Washington continue to monitor these volcanoes closely and will issue additional updates and changes in alert level as warranted.

Introduction

Mount Rainier at 4393 meters (14,410 feet) the highest peak in the Cascade Range is a dormant volcano whose load of glacier ice exceeds that of any other mountain in the conterminous United States. This tremendous mass of rock and ice, in combination with great topographic relief, poses a variety of geologic hazards, both during inevitable future eruptions and during the intervening periods of repose.

The volcano’s past behavior is the best guide to possible future hazards. The written history of Mount Rainier encompasses the period since about A.D. 1820, during which time one or two small eruptions, several small debris avalanches, and many small lahars (debris flows originating on a volcano) have occurred. This time interval is far too brief to serve as a basis for estimating the future behavior of a volcano that is several hundreds of thousands of years old. Fortunately, prehistoric deposits record the types, magnitudes, and frequencies of past events, and show which areas were affected by them. At Mount Rainier, as at other Cascade volcanoes, deposits produced since the latest ice age (approximately during the past 10,000 years) are well preserved. Studies of these deposits reveal that we should anticipate potential hazards from some phenomena that only occur during eruptions and from others that may occur without eruptive activity. Tephra falls, pyroclastic flows and pyroclastic surges, ballistic projectiles, and lava flows occur only during eruptions. Debris avalanches, lahars, and floods commonly accompany eruptions, but can also occur during dormant periods.

This report (1) explains the various types of hazardous geologic phenomena that could occur at Mount Rainier, (2) shows areas that are most likely to be affected by the different phenomena, (3) estimates the likelihood that the areas will be affected, and (4) recommends actions that can be taken to protect lives and property. It builds upon and revises a similar document prepared by D.R. Crandell in 1973. Our revision was motivated by the availability of new information about Mount Rainier’s geologic history, by advances in the field of volcanology, and by the need to assess hazards in a more quantitative manner than in Crandell’s pioneering report. —R.P. Hoblitt, J.S. Walder, C.L. Driedger, K.M. Scott, P.T. Pringle, and J.W. Vallance, 1998, Volcano Hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington, Revised 1998: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 98-428

REPORT:
Volcano Hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington, Revised 1998

Mount Rainier at 4,393 meters (14,410 feet) the highest peak in the Cascade Range is a dormant volcano whose load of glacier ice exceeds that of any other mountain in the conterminous United States. This tremendous mass of rock and ice, in combination with great topographic relief, poses a variety of geologic hazards, both during inevitable future eruptions and during the intervening periods of repose. … This report (1) explains the various types of hazardous geologic phenomena that could occur at Mount Rainier, (2) shows areas that are most likely to be affected by the different phenomena, (3) estimates the likelihood that the areas will be affected, and (4) recommends actions that can be taken to protect lives and property. It builds upon and revises a similar document prepared by D.R. Crandell in 1973. Our revision was motivated by the availability of new information about Mount Rainier’s geologic history, by advances in the field of volcanology, and by the need to assess hazards in a more quantitative manner than in Crandell’s pioneering report. —Hoblitt, et.al., 1998

Ongoing Activity:

FEWW Forecast: Mount Rainier could erupt in the next 36 months with a probability of 0.65 [and in the next 18 months with a probability of >0.5]

Posted in Cleveland, Koryaksky, Mauna Loa, Okmok, Redoubt | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »