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Archive for the ‘Montserrat’ Category

Satellite Images of Recent Volcanic Activities

Posted by feww on February 16, 2010

Recent Activity at Shiveluch Volcano


Shiveluch Volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula ejected a plume of ash, volcanic gases and steam, while dark rivulets flowed down the volcano’s snowy slopes. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image on February 13, 2010. Dark flows on the snowy slopes could result from lava and/or lahars—avalanches of water and mud likely prompted by heat from the summit.

Shiveluch is among Kamchatka’s most active volcanoes. In mid-February 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported that activity at Shiveluch had been elevated above background levels for days, including a lava flow as well as ash plumes reaching an altitude of 5.2 kilometers (17,060 feet). NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen. Caption by Michon Scott. Edited by FEWW.

Partial Dome Collapse at Soufriere Hills


Soufrière Hills Volcano on the Caribbean island of Montserrat experienced a partial dome collapse on February 11, 2010 at 12:35 pm local time. Lasting nearly an hour, the event sent a plume 15 km (50,000 feet) skyward, and sent pyroclastic flows—avalanches of hot gas and debris—some 300 to 400 meters (980 to 1,200 feet) out to sea. The pyroclastic flows destroyed many buildings in the village of Harris north of Sourfrière Hills, and the Montserrat Volcano Observatory described the dome collapse as the most severe incident since May 2006.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image on February 11, 2010, the same afternoon that the dome collapsed. An east-west volcanic plume completely obscures the island of Montserrat, casting a shadow toward the northeast. Two smaller, fainter plumes also extend from the island, one to the north and the other to the south. The northern plume lies in the shadow of the east-west plume and consequently must occur at a lower altitude. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team  at NASA GSFC. Caption by Michon Scott. Edited by FEWW.


View E across ash-covered Plymouth, the former capital city and major port of Montserrat, toward Soufriere Hills volcano.
Before the volcano became active in July 1995, about 5,000 people lived in Plymouth, located 4 km west of English’s Crater. During the first two years of the eruption, ash and noxious gas from explosions and pyroclastic flows frequently settled on Plymouth. On August 3, about 3 weeks after this image was taken, the first significant pyroclastic flow swept through the evacuated town. The flow triggered many fires and caused extensive damage to buildings and community facilities by direct impact and burial. Date: 12 July 1997. Credit: R.P. Hoblitt/ USGS

In Uncertain Future for Montserrat Island, Fire-Earth Moderators estimated that the island could become completely uninhabitable by 2013 or earlier

Fire Earth’s EarthModel forecasts the probability of Montserrat island becoming completely uninhabitable as follows:

Probability of Montserrat Becoming Uninhabitable in the Near Future

  • 2009 ≥ 50%
  • 2010 ≥ 56%
  • 2011 ≥ 60%
  • 2012 ≥ 70%
  • 2013 ≥ 80%

Montserrat Island Details:

  • Capital:
    • Plymouth (destroyed in 1997- see photo below)
    • Brades (de facto)
  • Location: Montserrat Island
  • Coordinates: (16.72 N, 62.18 W)
  • Height: 915 meters (3,010 feet)
  • Official languages:     English
  • Ethnic groups:     West African, Mulatto, British, Irish
  • Government:     British Overseas Territory
  • Area:   102 km²  (39 sq mi )

Related Links:


Posted in Montserrat, Soufrière Hills, volcanism, volcano | Tagged: , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Soufriere Hills Volcano Vents Ash

Posted by feww on October 7, 2009

Image of the Day:  Soufriere Hills undergoes three vigorous ‘ash venting’ episodes

Soufriere Hills Volcano
Soufriere Hills Volcano has remained at an increased activity level, after undergoing three vigorous ‘ash venting’ events, with the third event lasting 10 minutes, at 10:00am local time on October 5, 2009. Photo: Montserrat Volcano Observatory. Image may be subject to copyright.

MVO reported a small swarm of VT earthquakes, followed by “a period of tremor associated with vigorous ash venting” that resulted in large ash plumes drifting WNW over the island and out to sea. “Only a very light dusting of ash fell in Old Towne and Olveston as the plumes moved to the south of the inhabited areas.”

MVO observed no explosive activity or pyroclastic flows associated with the ash venting, which ceased at about 12:00am local time. “Two rockfall signals followed the vigorous ash venting,” followed by continual ash venting, however, no further seismicity occurred.

montserrat_tmo_2009279
After 10 months of relative quiet, Soufriere Hills volcano on the Caribbean island of Montserrat blasted ash into the sky in early October 2009. This natural-color satellite image shows a plume of ash extending westward from Soufriere Hills on October 6, 2009, a day after eruptive activity resumed on October 5th. A pilot reported ash extending 280 kilometers (170 miles) at an elevation of approximately 3,600 meters (12,000 feet).
In 1995, a series of major eruptions forced the evacuation of the Montserrat’s former capital city, Plymouth. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of this region. Caption by Robert Simmon. [Edited by FEWW]

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

Posted in Caribbean islands, island of Montserrat, Montserrat, Plymouth, stratovolcano, volcanic activity, volcanic unrest, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Hefty Omar May Develope into a Hurricane

Posted by feww on October 15, 2008

Update 10-16: Omar is now a cat 2 hurricane!

Omar is moving in a northeastly direction at 28 kmph. [Center located at latitude 16.6 north, longitude 65.2 west or about 137 km south-southwest of St. Croix and 227 km south-southeast of San Juan Puerto Rico.]  Omar is expected to move through the northern Leeward islands and the Virgin Islands  early Thursday, NHC reported.

Omar seems to have the potential to strengthen to a much larger hurricane under current/favorable conditions, according to FEWW model.

TS Omar headed toward Puerto Rico may become a hurricane soon

Tropical Storm Omar is likely to develop into a hurricane in the next few hours, the U.S. National Hurricane Center reported.

The storm headed toward Puerto Rico at about 11 kmph with sustained winds of 110 kmph was located near latitude 14.6 north, longitude 68.3 west or about 540 km south-southwest of San Juan Puerto Rico on October 15 at 01:15UTC.


TS Omar AVN Color Enhanced Satellite Image (still frame) – Oct 15, 2008 at 01:15UTC – SSD/NOAA

Hurricane watch and a tropical storm warning areas:

  • Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Islands of Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten/Martin, and St. Barthelemy.
  • The island of Montserrat.

Posted in Montserrat, Saba, San Juan, St. Barthelemy, St. Kitts | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »