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Archive for the ‘oil’ Category

Obama: A Serious Self-Hater

Posted by feww on April 1, 2010

Serial No  1,520. Starting today, each new post on this blog has been allocated a serial number. If any of the numbers is missing, it may mean the corresponding entry has been blocked by the authorities/Google in your country. Please drop us a line, if you detect any missing numbers.

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Obama Hates Himself, His Kids, His Family and Rest of the World

He hates himself because he is emotionally unstable, has a weak character and has been trodden on all his life.

His hatred for rest of the world is all too evident in Iraq and Afghanistan. He has the blood of thousands of people on his hands, and it won’t wash off.

But, above all, he hates his kids. He couldn’t give a damn if they had a chance, a future, or not.

He has just unveiled plans for a “limited expansion” of offshore oil and gas drilling shamelessly disguised as winning Republican support for new strategies to fight climate change.

The moratoriums on offshore exploration which were secured  in the 1980s are all out of the window. [This is what the President had earlier called “hope and change.”]

Oh, and he hates wildlife, especially in the coastal areas.

President B.O. is a pathological liar, too.


AssociatedPress — March 31, 2010 — Reversing a ban on oil and gas drilling off most U.S. shores, President Barack Obama announced an expansive new policy that could put oil and natural gas platforms in waters along the Atlantic coastline, the Gulf of Mexico and parts of Alaska.

If the national security of a country entails the health and well-being of its people, then Obama’s plan to expand offshore oil and gas drilling is a direct threat to the national security of the United States.

Here’s the unintelligent lies he delivered at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland recently:

“Today we’re announcing the expansion of offshore oil and gas exploration, but in ways that balance the need to harness domestic energy resources and the need to protect America’s natural resources.”

“Drilling alone can’t come close to meeting our long-term energy needs, and for the sake of our planet and our energy independence, we need to begin the transition to cleaner fuels now,” Obama said.

Just exactly what are our “long-term energy needs?” What exactly are your plans for saving the planet? What are “cleaner fuels?” How much cleaner are they? Exactly, how much of these cleaner fuels do you have in mind?

Note that everything is left vague and in a haze of uncertainty in the hope that somehow you’ll figure it out, making sense out of his utter nonsense. He hopes the majority will never catch on to the truth. Will you ever stop bullcrapping?

“I know that we can come together to pass comprehensive energy and climate legislation that’s going to foster new energy—new industries, create millions of new jobs, protect our planet, and help us become more energy independent,” Obama added.

What a load of hot doublespeak, Mr President.

“My administration will consider potential new areas for development in the mid and south Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.”

Meanwhile, his administration announced the cancellation of oil and gas drilling leases in the Bristol Bay area [for now, at least!] as well as four other [useless, unwanted] leases in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas off the north coast of Alaska.  The region will remain available to “future scientific research to assess their suitability for leasing.”


DOI Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Strategy – Lower 48 – Click image to enlarge.


DOI Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Strategy – Eastern Coast of Mexico Planning Area – Click image to enlarge.


DOI Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Strategy – Alaska Strategy – Click image to enlarge.

“There will be those who strongly disagree with this decision,” said Obama with a smirk.

No shit, Mr B.O.

What would his plan really mean

  • Continued addiction to oil
  • More intense, faster paces of climate change
  • Wilder climatic swings
  • Deadlier weather patterns
  • More oil spills
  • More sea and coastal pollution
  • Additional threats to marine life
  • More threats to the livelihood of coastal communities

May something have mercy on hid kids because, sure as climate change, nature will be inclement.

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Posted in ConocoPhillips, Fossil Fuel, oil, oil and gas drilling, US energy policy | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments »

Arctic Marine Mammals on Thin Ice

Posted by feww on April 24, 2008

(source: Ecological Society of America)

Experts outline primary risks of climate change to natives of the Arctic

The loss of sea ice due to climate change could spell disaster for polar bears and other Arctic marine mammals. The April Special Issue of Ecological Applications examines such potential effects, puts them in historical context, and describes possible conservation measures to mitigate them. The assessment reflects the latest thinking of experts representing multiple scientific disciplines.

Sea ice is the common habitat feature uniting these unique and diverse Arctic inhabitants. Sea ice serves as a platform for resting and reproduction, influences the distribution of food sources, and provides a refuge from predators. The loss of sea ice poses a particularly severe threat to Arctic species, such as the hooded seal, whose natural history is closely tied to, and depends on, sea ice.

The Arctic undergoes dramatic seasonal transformation. Arctic marine mammals appear to be well adapted to the extremes and variability of this environment, having survived past periods of extended warming and
cooling.


Walrus – Odobenus rosmarus divergens – hauled out on Bering Sea ice, Alaska. (Photo Credit: Captain Budd Christman, NOAA Corps)

“However, the rate and scale of current climate change are expected to distinguish current circumstances from those of the past several millennia. These new conditions present unique challenges to the well-being of Arctic marine mammals,” says Sue Moore (NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center).

Climate change will pose a variety of threats to marine mammals. For some, such as polar bears, it is likely to reduce the availability of their prey, requiring them to seek alternate food. Authors Bodil Bluhm and Rolf Gradinger (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) note that while some Arctic marine mammal species may be capable of adjusting to changing food availability, others may be handicapped by their very specific food requirements and hunting techniques. Species such as the walrus and polar bear fall under this category, while the beluga whale and bearded seal are among those who are more opportunistic in their eating habits and therefore potentially less vulnerable, at least in this regard.


Look here, General George, I can’t unzip the fur! (Photo Credit:Kathy Crane, NOAA Arctic Research Office.)

Using a quantitative index of species sensitivity to climate change, Kristin Laidre (University of Washington) and colleagues found that the most sensitive Arctic marine mammals appear to be the hooded seal, polar bear, and the narwhal, primarily due to their reliance on sea ice and specialized feeding.

Shifts in the prey base of Arctic marine mammals would likely lead to changes in body condition and potentially affect the immune system of marine mammals, according to Kathy Burek (Alaska Veterinary Pathology Services). She and fellow researchers point out that climate change may alter pathogen transmission and exposure to infectious diseases, possibly lowering the health of marine mammals and, in the worst case, their survival. Changing environmental conditions, including more frequent bouts of severe weather and rising air and water temperatures, also could impact the health of Arctic marine mammals.


Exasperated polar bears shoo the submarine USS Honolulu off their melting porch (450 km from the North Pole).

The effects of climate change will be compounded by a host of secondary factors. The loss of ice will open the Arctic to new levels of shipping, oil and gas exploration and drilling, fishing, hunting, tourism, and coastal development. These, in turn, will add new threats to marine mammal populations, including ship strikes, contaminants, and competition for prey.

Timothy Ragen (US Marine Mammal Commission) and colleagues describe how conservation measures may be able to address the secondary effects of climate change, but that only reductions in greenhouse gas emissions can-over the long-term-conserve Arctic marine mammals and the Arctic ecosystems on which they depend.

Ragen talks more about the issue on an Ecological Society of America podcast. Visit http://www.esa.org/podcast/ to listen to this latest edition of ESA’s podcast, Field Talk.

Lead authors of the collection of papers in the Special Supplement to Ecological Applications are:

John Walsh (U. of AK, Fairbanks)–climatological understanding C.R. Harrington (Canadian Museum of Nature)–evolutionary history of arctic marine mammals Maribeth Murray (U. of AK, Fairbanks)–past distributions of arctic marine mammals Gregory O’Corry-Crowe (Southwest Fisheries Science Center)–past and current distributions and behaviors Bodil Bluhm (U. of AK, Fairbanks)–food availability and implications of climate change Kristin Laidre (U. of WA)–sensitivity to climate-induced habitat change Kathy Burek (Alaska Veterinary Pathology Services)–effects on Arctic marine mammal health Grete Havelsrud (Center for International Climate & Environmental Research-Oslo)–human interactions Vera Metcalf (Eskimo Walrus Commission, Kawerak)–walrus hunting Sue Moore (NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center)/Henry Huntington (Huntington Consulting)–resilience of Arctic marine mammals to climate change Timothy Ragen (U.S. Marine Mammal Commission)–conservation in context of climate change

The Ecological Society of America is the world’s largest professional organization of ecologists, representing 10,000 scientists in the United States and around the globe. Since its founding in 1915, ESA has promoted the responsible application of ecological principles to the solution of environmental problems through ESA reports, journals, research, and expert testimony to Congress. ESA publishes four journals and convenes an annual scientific conference. Visit the ESA website at http://www.esa.org.

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Posted in Climate Change, coastal development, energy, environment, exploration, food, gas, Global Warming, health, hunting, oil, polar bears, politics, shipping, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

The Shrinking Window of Opportunity

Posted by feww on April 19, 2008

Two Questions for Don Quixote

1. General George, do you fight Global Warming, or prevent it?
2. How do you fight global warming?


World’s Top 33 Emitters of CO2


The top 20 emitters are responsible for about 80 percent of CO2 pollution. (Source: Wikipedia)


The Shrinking Window of Opportunity (Inset photo REUTERS/Jim Young). Image may be subject to copyright.

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Posted in air pollution, coal, environment, greenhouse gasses, oil, rising seas | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »