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Archive for the ‘Sarychev Peak’ Category

VolcanoWatch Weekly [23 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 23, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 15 July – 21 July 2009

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

VOW: Revisiting Mount Tambora Volcano, Sumbawa Island, Indonesia

Tambora
On April 10, 1815, the Tambora Volcano produced the largest eruption in recorded history. An estimated 150 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of tephra—exploded rock and ash—resulted, with ash from the eruption recognized at least 1,300 kilometers (808 miles) away to the northwest. While the April 10 eruption was catastrophic, historical records and geological analysis of eruption deposits indicate that the volcano had been active between 1812 and 1815. Enough ash was put into the atmosphere from the April 10 eruption to reduce incident sunlight on the Earth’s surface, causing global cooling, which resulted in the 1816 “year without a summer.”

This detailed astronaut photograph depicts the summit caldera of the volcano. The huge caldera—6 kilometers (3.7 miles) in diameter and 1,100 meters (3,609 feet) deep—formed when Tambora’s estimated 4,000-meter- (13,123-foot) high peak was removed, and the magma chamber below emptied during the April 10 eruption. Today the crater floor is occupied by an ephemeral freshwater lake, recent sedimentary deposits, and minor lava flows and domes from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Layered tephra deposits are visible along the northwestern crater rim. Active fumaroles, or steam vents, still exist in the caldera.

In 2004, scientists discovered the remains of a village, and two adults buried under approximately 3 meters (nearly 10 feet) of ash in a gully on Tambora’s flank—remnants of the former Kingdom of Tambora preserved by the 1815 eruption that destroyed it. The similarity of the Tambora remains to those associated with the AD 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius has led to the Tambora site’s description as “the Pompeii of the East.”

Astronaut photograph ISS020-E-6563 was acquired on June 3, 2009  [photo caption said acquired March 6, 2009] , with a Nikon D3 digital camera fitted with an 800 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 20 crew. The image in this article has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. Lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by William L. Stefanov, NASA-JSC.

New activity/unrest:

Ongoing Activity:

  • Bagana, Bougainville
  • Barren Island, Andaman Is
  • Batu Tara, Komba Island (Indonesia)
  • Chaitén, Southern Chile
  • Egon, Flores Island (Indonesia)
  • Ibu, Halmahera
  • Kilauea, Hawaii
  • Makian, Halmahera
  • Rabaul, New Britain
  • Sarychev Peak, Matua Island
  • Semeru, Eastern Java (Indonesia)
  • Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan)

Related Links:

FEWW Links:

Posted in Batu Tara, Chaiten, Komba Island, Sakura-jima, Sarychev Peak | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [16 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 16, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 8 July – 14 July 2009

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

NOTES: A large sulfur dioxide plume and several thermal anomalies from Manda Hararo that were detected in satellite imagery during 28-30 June prompted a science team to visit the area on 4 July. They saw new predominantly ‘a’a lava flows that were 2-3 m thick. The fissure was lined with scoria ramparts 30-50 m high.

On 10 July, AVO reported that a distinct thermal anomaly in Shishaldin’s summit crater observed intermittently since January 2009 became more intense during the previous month. AVO raised the Aviation Color Code and the Volcano Alert Level. (Source: GVP)

VOW: More Volcanoes to watch for 2009-10

  • Buvet
  • Colima
  • Rabul  [Explosive eruption more powerful than 1994 may occur]

Ongoing Activity:

  • Batu Tara, Komba Island (Indonesia)
  • Chaitén, Southern Chile
  • Dukono, Halmahera
  • Fuego, Guatemala
  • Kilauea, Hawaii (USA)
  • Pacaya, Guatemala
  • Rabaul, New Britain
  • Sakura-jima, Kyushu
  • Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates

Alaska Volcano Observatory Update: July 16, 2009 0300 UTC

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

  • Cleveland Activity – Color Code – UNASSIGNED: Alert Level UNASSIGNED

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 18:05 UTC

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Related Links:

FEWW Links:

Posted in Buvet, Rabul, San Miguel, Sarychev Peak, Shishaldin | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »