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Archive for the ‘Volcanic Activity Report’ Category

Santa María Volcano Continues to Erupt

Posted by feww on May 11, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07
.

Mass evacuations ordered as  Santa María continues to erupt

Santa María volcano (volcán Santiaguito) is a large active volcano located in the Western Highlands of Guatemala, near he city of Quetzaltenango. The volcano has been eruting since May 9, 2014, forcing the authorities to evacuate hundreds of people.

Lahar races down a river valley near El Palmar

lahar from Santiaguito
Original caption: Image provided by Guatemala’s Prensa Libre Newspaper on May 9, 2014 shows a man watching the volcanic material descending at El Palmar municipalty of Quetzaltenango department in Guatemala. The Santiaguito volcano continues its explosive activity with less intensity, according to technicians of Guatemala’s Disaster Reduction National Coordinator, according to local press. (Xinhua/Prensa Libre)

santiaguito volcano
Santa María volcano erupts. Credit Daniel Leclair/ Reuters

Santa María’s eruption in 1902 is recorded as the fourth largest volcanic explosion of the 20th century with a VEI of 6 [‘Colossal’.]

The volcanic ash from the eruption was detected as far away as San Francisco, more than 4,000 km away.

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Sakurajima Volcano Erupts Explosively

Posted by feww on May 11, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07
.

Rivers of of lava and large columns of ash moving in the direction of Ibusiki City

Sakurajima’s eruption on Sunday was the most powerful one at the volcano so far this year.

The explosion ejected a column of ash and smoke to a height of about 4.5km above the Minamidake crater, according to local reports.

One of the most active volcanoes in the world, Sakurajima is located in Kagoshima Bay, southern Kyushu, Japan (about 1,100km WSW of Tokyo). The composite volcano has three peaks: Kitadake, Nakadake and Minamidake (southern peak).

Since 1955 the Minamidake crater has been continually active. The ongoing activity includes strong strombolian to ash explosions at least once and as many as 8 times a day.

The volcano was placed under a Level 3 (orange) alert by the Japan Meteorological Agency on March 21, 2012.

Level 3 (orange) alert means the volcano is active (do not approach crater).

A major lava flow in 1914 connected the volcano island  to the Osumi Peninsula on the Kyushu Island.

There were no immediate report of damage or casualties, as of posting.

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Mass Evacuations as Sinabung Erupts Again

Posted by feww on January 8, 2014

Mount Sinabung Continues to Eject Volcanic Materials into the Air

Some 22,000 people living near Sinabung volcano have been evacuated Since Monday after the volcano erupted in North Sumatra, Indonesia.

The volcano is spewing columns of ash and smoke up to 4.5km above the summit crater, authorities said.

sinabung 7jan14
About 22,000 people have been evacuated near Mt Sinabung as the volcano continues to erupt. Mount Sinabung has been ejecting columns of ash and smoke up to 4.5km above the summit crater since Saturday. More than 60 pyroclastic flows extending up to 5 km from the crater have also been recorded. Photo credit: Agung Kuncahya B./Xinhua.  More images…

“The National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) has instructed all relevant ministries, government institutions, local disaster mitigation agencies and the Karo regency administration in North Sumatra to prepare for a worst-case scenario following an increase in Mount Sinabung’s volcanic activity during the past week,” said a report.

The “worst-case scenario” comes into if the exclusion zone is extended from its latest 7km radius, southeast slope of the volcano, to between 7.5 and 10 km from the crater.

More than 60 pyroclastic flows extending up to 5 km from the crater have been recorded with the flow volume increasing every day, said The National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB).

The volume of volcanic material ejected so far is about a quarter of the total 2,540,000 cubic meters formed in Mt. Sinabung’s crater. “This means that the pyroclastic potential stored in the volcano’s lava dome is still substantial; so if it should all come out, the threat would be devastating,” Jakarta post quoted an official as saying.


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra could cause the collapse of Singapore. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Chronology of Recent Eruptions

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic event, volcanism, volcanism report, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mass Evacuation Ordered as Mt SINABUNG Put on Red Alert

Posted by feww on November 24, 2013

18,000 people evacuated as Sinabung activity intensifies

Mt Sinabung’s latest explosive eruption has prompted the authorities to raise the volcanic alert to the highest level, “siaga,” or “red alert,” according to Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation Center.

The alert level was raised from “orange” or “level III ” to the highest level “red” or “level IV” by PVMBG on Sunday, as the authorities evacuated an additional  11,618 residents from 19 villages and expanded the evacuation zone to a 5-km exclusion  zone from 3 km previously.

“This is Sinabung’s highest level of activity. The intensity of the eruptions continues to increase,” said Hendrasto, head of PVMBG.

sinabung erupting 24nov2013
Villagers evacuate to a safe area, as Mount Sinabung ejects ash into air at Aman Teran village in Karo district, Indonesia’s North Sumatra province, November 24, 2013. Credit: Reuters/YT Haryono. More images…

As of 2 p.m. local time on Sunday, Sinabung was continuing to eject an 8-km high column of smoke and ash into the air, he said.

Some 6,000 villagers had already been evacuated from the 3-km exclusion zone, about 90 km from Medan, capital of North Sumatra province.

The North Sumatra health has distributed 180,000 face masks, medicine and 4 tons of baby formula to relief posts in Karo regency, reported Jakarta Post.

mt sinabung
Mt Sinabung erupted explosively again on November 12, 2013 for a second time in 9 days. Image credit: CRIonLine via Xinhua. More images…


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.


Mount Sinabung ejected tephra into the air as seen from Tanah Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Dedy Zulkifli). Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Chronology of Recent Eruptions

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano, volcano alert, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Volcano Erupts in Ogasawara Islands

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

Warning issued to Pacific shipping after volcano erupts, forming a new Island

Authorities have warned shipping in the Pacific Ocean to maintain vigilance for airborne volcanic material after a volcano erupted near one of the Ogasawara Islands, some 1,000 kilometers south of Tokyo, NHK reported Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) as saying.

Japan Coast Guard has confirmed black smoke spewing out of a new land mass about 500 meters southeast of Nishinoshima island, JMA said

Video footage shows a plume of black and white smoke and steam  rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new landmass measuring about 200 meters across.

Ogasawara - new island formed from volcanic eruption
Black and white smoke and steam rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new 200-m long landmass created by volcanic eruption near Nishino shima, Bonin Islands, south of Japan. Screenshot from NHK news video clip.

new volcanic island
Screenshot  from NHK news video clip.

“The agency says multiple clusters of white smoke overhead suggest intermittent explosions,” said the report.

Volcanic activity created a new island which was fused to the uninhabited Nishinoshima between 1973 and 1974, the last time when eruptions occurred near the island.


Location Map of Volcano Islands, Ogasawara Islands, Japan region. Image credit: Lim Tor


Bonin Islands (aka, Ogasawara Group, in Japan).  Click Image to Enlarge.

In 2010, one of the volcanoes in the region erupted, spewing smoke and ash to a height of about about 100 meters above the sea level. The surrounding sea area changed to a greenish-yellow color with nearby areas turning cloudy.

JMA said the volcano, called Fukutokuokanoba, had erupted seven times since 1904, forming ephemeral islands (temporary land masses) on three occasions, all of which later sank below the ocean surface.

The first known ephemeral island called Shin-Iwo-jima (New Sulfur Island) was formed in 1904, and the most recent in 1986.

What the Volcano Islands Look Like


North Iwo Jima Island (Official Japanese name Kita-iōtō, but commonly known as Kita-iōjima, meaning “north sulfur island”) is the northernmost island of the Volcano Islands cluster of the Ogasawara Islands, about 1175 km south of Tokyo. Image Credit: Chisatos

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A Second Indonesian Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on November 19, 2013

Mt Merapi eruption follows multiple explosions at Mt Sinabung

“Mount Merapi experienced a phreatic eruption. Its status remains normal due to a lack of activity,” said Yogyakarta’s Geological Disaster Technology Development and Research Agency (BPPTKG).

On November 16, 2013 FIRE-EARTH warned: 22 Indonesian Volcanoes Remain on High Alerts

Mt Merapi was placed on “Yellow Alert,” or “Level II” of the country’s 4-level alert system, on August 3, 2013.

Mt merapi
Latest Image of Mt Merapi. Credit: Badan Geologi.

“On Monday at 4:52 a.m. before the eruption, BPPTKG detected an earthquake in Ciamis, West Java, at a magnitude of 4.7 on the Richter scale. The tectonic quake is believed to have shaken the magma chamber of Mount Merapi causing it to release gas from below,” said BPPTKG spokesperson.

Merapi ejected volcanic materials about 2 kilometers into the air showering a 60-km radius area east of the volcano with ash, said the report.

The authorities have since imposed 1-kilometer exclusion zone around the volcano base.

The phreatic eruption on Monday was similar to one on July 22, said National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) spokesman. “But today’s was more powerful than the July 22 eruption.”

More than 600 families living in Kalitengah Lor, Kalitengah Kidul and Srune hamlets, in Glagaharjo village, Sleman regency, Yogyakarta, have been evacuated.

Hundreds of other villagers living on the western flank of Mount Merapi also fled their homes.

“The volcanic ash also affected residents in nearby towns. In Surakarta, Central Java, residents were shocked by the sight of volcanic ash covering streets, gardens and roofs. The ash rain continued until around 10 a.m. on Monday.” said the report.

“Surowedanan village in Boyolali, located around 17 km from the peak of Mount Merapi, was also covered by volcanic ash. ‘This morning, when I went out of the house at around 5 a.m., I saw ash everywhere,’ said Veronica Maria Sayektiana, of Surowedanan. According to Veronica, residents were wearing masks when they ventured out of their homes as the ash was still falling along with the drizzle.”

Merapi eruptions have killed hundreds of people in the past couple of decades.

Mount Merapi is one of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia. The 2010 its eruptions killed more than 300 people dead and forced about 400,000 people to evacuate their towns, while a 1930 eruption left at least 1,300 dead.

Mt Sinabung Update

The Indonesian ministry of transportation has diverted all flights to avoid routes near Mt Sinabung, located in Karo District, North Sumatra, which has erupted multiple times since last week.

The authorities say Mt Sinabung eruption on November 12 ejected  volcanic material that covered five districts destroying some 1,893 hectares of citrus plantations in Tanah Karo, which has impacted fruit production, said a report.

The explosive activity follows a series of most recent eruptions exhibited by the 2,460-meter high volcano that began in September 2013, leading to a significant eruption on October 24, which saw the volcano spewing smoke and ash to a height of about 3km above the crater summit, followed by other eruptions, especially the explosive eruption that occurred on Sunday, November 3.

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Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic activity, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic ash, volcanic earthquake, volcanic eruption, volcanic eruptions, volcanic event, volcanic unrest, volcanism report | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Second Alaska Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on May 16, 2013

Pavlof ejects ash and steam, as lava flows down its NW flank

Pavlof Volcano, the second Volcano in the Aleutians to become active, began erupting on Monday and was still spewing clouds of ash and steam on Wednesday, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said.

The volcano has been emitting intermittent dark clouds of ash and steam rising up to 20,000 feet a.s.l. and drifting in a northeasterly direction, the observatory said.

  • Mt Cleveland, the other currently active Alaskan volcano, has been erupting intermittently since 2011.
  • Volcanic ash from Pavlof and other Alaska volcanoes could pose a threat to air traffic in the region.

Pavlof Activity: Color Code ORANGE  – Alert Level WATCH

  • PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-) 55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W
  • Summit Elevation:  2,518 m (8261 ft)

pavlof
Pavlof Volcano in eruption. View is from the southwest in Cold Bay. Lava fountaining is visible near the summit, and steam and ash clouds rise from the northwest flank where a lava flow advances down the slope. May 14, 2013 11:26 AM AKDT. Credit: Rachel Kremer/AVO

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

Cleveland location map
Location of Cleveland volcano and other Aleutian volcanoes with respect to nearby cities and towns.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

The following report is mirrored from AVO

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 12:40 PM AKDT (May 15, 2013 20:40UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Elevated seismic activity persists and a steam and ash cloud are visible in web camera images rising occasionally up to about 20,000 ft. above sea level. A diffuse ash plume was reported late last night at an altitude of 15,000 above sea level and extending downwind to the northeast for up to 100 miles before dissipating. A recent pilot report today indicated a dark ash cloud extending east-northeast at an altitude of 20,000 above sea level. National Weather Service issued a Sigmet yesterday that remains active today.

Residents of Cold Bay, located 37 miles southwest of the volcano, observed incandescent glow at the summit during the night. Pilot reports and photographs from yesterday afternoon indicate that the lava flow extending down the northwest flank is still active and has generated debris-laden flow deposits, presumably from interaction of hot lava with the snow and ice on the flank.

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Elevated surface temperatures continued at Cleveland Volcano over the past 24 hours. No explosions have been detected by regional infrasound data. There has been no further information about the lava flow.

Sudden explosions of blocks and ash are possible with little or no warning. Ash clouds, if produced, could exceed 20,000 feet above sea level. If a large ash-producing event occurs, nearby seismic, infrasound, or volcanic lightning networks should alert AVO staff quickly. However, for some events, a delay of several hours is possible. Cleveland Volcano does not have a local seismic network and is monitored using only distant seismic and infrasound instruments and satellite data.

AVO will continue to monitor these volcanoes and issue additional information as available.

Code Definitions
ORANGE Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway with no or minor volcanic-ash emissions [ash-plume height specified, if possible].

WATCH: Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway but poses limited hazards.

VOLCANO INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET: http://www.avo.alaska.edu
RECORDING ON THE STATUS OF ALASKA’S VOLCANOES (907) 786-7478

CONTACT INFORMATION:
John Power, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

Jeff Freymueller, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
jeff.freymueller@gi.alaska.edu (907) 378-7556

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcano, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Plosky Tolbachik Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on March 5, 2013

Plosky Tolbachik spews two long streams of lava

PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (55.83 N, 160.39 E; CAVW #1000-24-)
Elevation:  3,085 m (10119 ft )
Aviation Color Code:  ORANGE

The massive 3,085-meter-high Plosky [flat] Tolbachik, one of Russia’s largest volcanoes, has spewed two streams of lava, one extending for about 18km and the other 6km one made 18 kilometers, said a report.

  • “The fiery river has been setting trees on its way ablaze while turning ice and snow into clouds of steam.”

Simultaneous activities have also been detected in the Kizimen and Shiveluch volcanoes in the Kamchatka region, the report said.

Holocene Volcanoes in Kamchatka
Holocene Volcanoes in Kamchatka
. Source: Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, Kamchatka, Russia

4 Kamchatka volcanoes are currently on ORANGE alert according to KVERT

1. PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (55.83 N, 160.39 E; CAVW #1000-24-)
Elevation:  3,085 m (10119 ft )

2. SHEVELUCH VOLCANO (56.64 N, 161.32 E; CAVW #1000-27-)
Elevation: 3, 283 m [the dome elevation: 2,500 m)

3. KIZIMEN VOLCANO (55.13 N, 160.32 E; CAVW #1000-23-)
Elevation: 2,485 m (8151 ft)

4. KARYMSKY VOLCANO (54.05 N, 159.44 E; CAVW #1000-13-)
Elevation 1,486 m (4874 ft)

3 other volcanoes on YELLOW alert

I. KLYUCHEVSKOY VOLCANO (56.06 N, 160.64 E; CAVW #1000-26-)
Elevation:  4,750 m

II. BEZYMIANNY VOLCANO (55.97 N, 160.6 E; CAVW #1000-25-)
Elevation: 2,882 m

III. GORELY VOLCANO (52.56 N, 158.03 E; CAVW #1000-07-)
Elevation: 1,828 m

Related Links

Related News

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March 5, 2013 – DISASTER CALENDAR SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,103 Days Left 

Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.

  • SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,103 Days Left to ‘Worst Day’ in the brief Human  History
  • The countdown began on May 15, 2011 …

GLOBAL WARNINGS

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in volcanic activity, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic earthquake, volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcano alert, Volcanology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

‘Red’ Alert at Copahue Volcano

Posted by feww on December 24, 2012

Copahue volcano activity could intensify

Authorities in Argentina and Chile have raised the alert at Copahue volcano  in Biobio region to the highest level after detecting continued seismic activity on Sunday.

Copahue volcano
A column of ash and smoke from Copahue volcano rises above the town of Caviahue, a popular ski resort in Neuquen province, Argentina, some 1500 km SW of the capital Buenos Aires. Photo: AFP. Image may be subject to copyright. 

  • Copahue first erupted on Saturday, showering ash on nearby villages and prompting many to evacuate.
  • “The intensity of seismic signals suggests the eruption in progress is on the smaller side [however] we cannot discount the possibility that the activity could turn into a larger eruption,” said a spokesman for the Chilean Geology and Mining Services.
  • The 2,970-meter volcano is in SW Argentina’s Neuquen province, near the Chilean border.
  • About 3,000 people live in the vicinity of the massive volcano, including  the residents of Copahue, the town of Caviahue and indigenous Mapuche communities.
  • The ash plume rose  to a height of about 1.5km (5,000ft) above the crater, said Chile’s emergency office (ONEMI).

Related Links:

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

GLOBAL WARNING

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic earthquake, volcanic eruptions, volcanism report, volcano alert, volcano eruption, Volcano Hazard, volcano images, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mt. Baekdu Could Erupt: Report

Posted by feww on February 11, 2011

N.Korea ‘Preparing for Eruption of Mt. Baekdu’

Mt. Baekdu may erupt, according to North Korean authorities, Radio Free Asia reports.

Local geologists are again warning of a volcanic eruption at Mt. Baekdu, a volcano located on the border between North Korea and China.

Baitoushan Volcano, China and North Korea


Mt Baekdu Volcano, April 2003. Source: NASA/JSC

Original Caption:

One of the largest known eruptions of the modern geologic period (the Holocene) occurred at Baitoushan Volcano (also known as Changbaishan in China and P’aektu-san in Korea) about 1000 A.D., with erupted material deposited as far away as northern Japan—a distance of approximately 1,200 kilometers. The eruption also created the 4.5-kilometer-diameter, 850-meter-deep summit caldera of the volcano, which is now filled with the waters of Lake Tianchi (or Sky Lake). This oblique astronaut photograph was taken during the winter season, and snow highlights frozen Lake Tianchi and lava flow lobes along the southern face of the volcano.

Baitoushan last erupted in 1702, and geologists consider it to be dormant. Gas emissions were reported from the summit and nearby hot springs in 1994, but no evidence of renewed activity of the volcano was observed. The Chinese-Korean border runs directly through the center of the summit caldera, and the mountain is considered sacred by the predominantly Korean population living near the volcano. Lake Tianchi is a popular resort destination, both for its natural beauty and alleged sightings of unidentified creatures living in its depths (similar to the legendary Loch Ness Monster in Scotland).

Changbaishan,aka Baitoushan (Korean: Baegdu or P’aektu-san)

Country: China/Korea
Region: Eastern China
Last Known Eruption: 1903
Summit Elevation: 2,744m (9,003 feet)
Latitude: 41.98°N 41°59’0″N
Longitude: 128.08°E 128°5’0″E
Source: GVP


Mt. Baekdu Volcano eruption in 1903 (?) Source NEWSIS via Chosunilbo. Image may be to subject to copyright.


Lake Tianchi (or Sky Lake) at the summit caldera of Mt. Baekdu Volcano. Promotional photo published by N. Korean government.

“Quoting sources in Ryanggang Province, North Korea, the station said two geography professors of Kim Jung-suk University of Education involved in a Mt. Baekdu expedition team have recently been to Pyongyang to attend a seminar on Mt. Baekdu volcanic activity.” Chosunilbo reported.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [22 July 2010]

Posted by feww on July 21, 2010

Plosky Tolbachik Volcano


The massive, flat-topped, 3,085-m Plosky Tolbachik Volcano (55°49’N, 160°24’E) last erupted in 1975-76. The cleaver-edged volcano to the left is Ostry Tolbachik. “The 1975-76 eruption from the summit and south-flank fissures was the largest historical basaltic eruption in Kamchatka.” Source:   KVERT. Image may be subject to copyright.

Kamchatka could experience major volcanic  eruptions 2010-2011

Holocene Volcanoes in Kamchatka

Map of Holocene Kamchatka volcanoes. Source KVERT

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (14 July – 20 July 2010)

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

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Other Volcano Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Pacaya Erupts, Covers Guatemala City with Ash

Posted by feww on May 28, 2010

Pacaya Volcano Erupts, Prompting the Authorities to Close Down Guatemala’s International Airport

Pacaya volcano, located about 25 kilometers south of the Guatemalan capital, erupted late Thursday local time depositing as much as 8 cm of ash over parts of the city.

The authorities closed down La Aurora international airport until further notice.

The closest villages to the volcano have been evacuated.


Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The 2,552-meter Pacaya volcano is in Group F on the above diagram.

The disaster could be exacerbated by heavy rains that would trigger flash floods causing deadly lahars and mudslides.

Major Volcanoes of Guatemala

Casualties and Damage:

Two people have been killed, and 59 others injured so far, with three children reported as missing.

At least 100 homes have been destroyed and many other damaged, as more reports come in. About 2,000 people have been evacuated.

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [14 January 2010]

Posted by feww on January 14, 2010

New activity/Unrest

6 January -12 January 2010
SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

During 11-12 January, activity from Tungurahua increased; ash plumes rose to higher altitudes and more explosions were detected. Incandescent blocks were ejected almost 1 km above the crater and 1.5 km away from the crater, onto the flanks. Gas-and-ash plumes rose to an altitude of 8 km (26,200 ft) a.s.l.

MVO reported that during 31 December-8 January pyroclastic flows from the Soufrière Hills lava dome continued to travel predominantly down areas to the N. On 8 January, a large pyroclastic flow event occurred after a collapsing fountain of tephra was observed on the NE side of the volcano. Source: GVP

Ongoing Activity

The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program.

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More Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [23 September 2009]

Posted by feww on September 24, 2009

Magnitude 6.4 EQ occurred off SW of Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico, at a depth of 35 km, today.

FEWW Comments: The strong earthquake may have primed for eruption either one or both of two volcanoes Bárcena, which forms the island of San Benedicto, and Socorro, located on island of the same name, about 380 km to the west of the EQ location.

VOW1: Bárcena


Bárcena volcano forms the elongated island of San Benedicto, seen here from the SW in March 1955. The tuff cone with the circular summit crater at the center and the lava delta to the right were formed during an eruption in 1952-53, the only eruption known from this volcano in historical time. Pleistocene trachytic lava domes are located at the far NE tip of the island. Dark-colored lava domes from the 1952-53 eruption can be seen in the summit crater. Photo by Adrian Richards, 1955. Caption: GVP

VOW2: Socorro


Cerro Evermann, the high point of Socorro Island, rises above a Mexican Naval camp near the southern tip of the island. Socorro lies in the Revillagigedo Islands south of Baja California. Cerro Evermann is a large tephra cone and lava dome complex that forms the 1050-m-high summit of the volcano. Rhyolitic lava domes have been constructed along flank rifts, and silicic lava flows erupted from summit and flank vents have created an extremely irregular shoreline. Only minor explosive activity has occurred in historical time. Photo by Martha Marin, 1998 (Mexican Navy).
Caption: GVP

map_ of mexico_volcanoes
Bárcena  and Socorro are shown to the lower left of the map.

SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(16 September – 22 September 2009)

New activity/Unrest:

News From GVP:

  • KVERT reported that although seismic activity from Kliuchevskoi did not exceed background levels during 11-18 September, weak tremor was detected. Strombolian activity that ejected tephra 70 m above the crater was seen at night on 16 and 17 September.
  • KVERT reported that during 11-18 September seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. On 13 September, pyroclastic flow deposits 5 km long were seen on the S part of the lava dome.  —GVP

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [9 September 2009]

Posted by feww on September 11, 2009

VOW: Toba the Sleeping Colossus

Toba
Lake Toba, Sumatra, Indonesia – Landsat photo – Source: NASA

Lake Toba is a supervolcano, 100 kilometres long and 30 kilometres wide, and 505 metres (1,666 ft) at its deepest point. Located in the middle of the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra with a surface elevation of about 900 metres (2,953 ft), the lake stretches from 2.88°N 98.52°E  to 2.35°N 99.1°E.  It is the largest volcanic lake in the world. It’s also the site of a supervolcanic eruption that occurred about 74,000 years ago, a massive climate-changing event. The eruption is believed to have had a VEI intensity of 8. This eruption, believed to have been the largest anywhere on Earth in the last 25 million years, may have had catastrophic consequences globally; some anthropologists and archeologists believe that it killed most humans then alive, creating a population bottleneck in Central Eastern Africa and India that affected the genetic inheritance of all humans today. (Source: Wikipedia).

Toba Large
Lake Toba Topography.
Source: Andaman Org.

Toba catastrophe theory

The Toba catastrophe theory holds that 70,000 to 75,000 years ago, a supervolcanic event at Lake Toba, on Sumatra, plunged the Earth into a mini-ice-age lasting several thousand years, reducing the world’s human population to 10,000 or even a mere 1,000 breeding pairs, creating a bottleneck in human evolution. The theory was proposed in 1998 by Stanley H. Ambrose of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The Toba eruption (the Toba event) occurred at what is now Lake Toba about 67,500 to 75,500 years ago. It had an estimated Volcanic Explosivity Index of 8 (described as “mega-colossal”), making it possibly the largest explosive volcanic eruption within the last twenty-five million years. It had a volume 300 cubic km greater than the Island Park Caldera supereruption (2500 cubic km) of 2.1 million years BP.

The total amount of erupted material was estimated at about 2,800 km³ — about 2,000 km³ of ignimbrite that flowed over the ground, and some 800 km³ that fell as ash, with the wind blowing most of it to the west. The pyroclastic flows of the eruption destroyed an area of 20,000 square kilometers, with ash deposits as thick as 600 metres near the main vent [ cf, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens ejected about 1.2 km³;  of material, whilst the largest volcanic eruption in historic times, at Mount Tambora in 1815, emitted the equivalent of 100 km3 of dense rock.] The eruption was also about three times the size of the latest Yellowstone eruption of Lava Creek 630,000 years ago. (Source: Wikipedia).

volcanic features of toba
The eruption of 73,000 years ago left the Sibandung caldera.  Lake Toba is surrounded by two small, active volcanos as well as several updomed areas and hot springs. These features indicate that there is activity below the surface today and that pressure is rising. Samosir island, too, is evidence for upthrust from below. From the record it seems that Toba produces major eruptions every 300-400,000 years. Source: Andaman Org.

Volcanic features in and around Lake Toba:

Grey area: Present-day topographic depression
green area: Updomed areas

Area # 1.  Sibandung caldera: made 73,000 years ago by the Toba YTT event (Young Toba Ash)
Area # 2. Haranggaol caldera: made 500,000 years ago by the Toba MTT event (Middle Toba Ash)
Area # 3.  Sibandung caldera: made 800,000 years ago by the Toba OTT event (Old Toba Ash)

The MTT and OTT events were not as large as the YTT event of 73,000 years ago
but were still major eruptions of at least VEI 7.

V1 Tandukbenua (Sipisopiso) – young dacit-andesite volcano
V2 Pusubukit volcano – young dacit-andesite volcano
D1 Pardepur dacite domes
D2 Tuk-tuk rhyolite dome
HS Hot springs
Source: Andaman Org.

Recent Activity

Large earthquakes have occurred in the vicinity of the volcano more recently, notably in 1987.  Other earthquakes have occurred in the area in 1892, 1916, and 1920-1922.

Lake Toba lies near the Great Sumatran fault which runs along the centre of Sumatra called the Sumatra Fracture Zone. The volcanoes of Sumatra and Java are part of the Sunda Arc, a result of the northeasterly movement of the Indo-Australian Plate which is sliding under the eastward-moving Eurasian Plate. The subduction zone in this area is very active: the seabed near the west coast of Sumatra has had several major earthquakes since 1995, including the 9.3 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake [followed by the deadly tsunami] and the 8.7 2005 Sumatra earthquake, the epicenters of which were around 300 km from Toba Lake. (Source: Wikipedia).

SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(26 August-1 September 2009)

New activity/unrest:

Notes [Source: GVP]

RVO reported that during 28 August-3 September white and gray ash plumes from Rabaul caldera’s Tavurvur cone rose 1.5 km above the crater and produced ashfall in Rabaul town (3-5 km NW) and surrounding areas.

The Washington VAAC reported that on 6 September an explosion from San Cristóbal produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude no higher than 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. The plume drifted 75 km W.

Ongoing Activity:

Related Links:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [27 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 28, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 19 August – 25 August 2009

VOW: Koryaksky

koryaksky_amo_2009239
Koryaksky Volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula released a plume on August 27, 2009, caught by MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The volcano has released intermittent ash and/or steam plumes late August.

This true-color image shows a pale plume, which consists primarily of water vapor, blowing away from the summit east-northeast, toward the Bering Sea.

Vostok Media reported simultaneous activity at six Kamchatka volcanoes, describing  the first concurrent unrest in 60 years as rare. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott. [Edited by FEWW.]

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

KORYAKSKY Eastern Kamchatka 53.320°N, 158.688°E; summit elev. 3,456 m

KVERT reported that during 14-21 August seismic activity from Koryaksky was slightly above background levels. During 13-16 August, gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 3.5-5 km (11,500-16,400 ft) a.s.l. Based on visual observations during 16-20 August, gas-and-steam plumes containing ash rose to altitudes of 3.5-4.2 km (11,500-13,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted in multiple directions. Ash plumes were also seen in satellite imagery, drifting 215 km E and W. On 23 August, a probable ash plume detected in satellite imagery drifted 50 km ESE. During 24-25 August, seismicity increased; more than 100 earthquakes were recorded. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Geologic Summary. The large symmetrical Koryaksky stratovolcano is the most prominent landmark of the NW-trending Avachinskaya volcano group, which towers above Kamchatka’s largest city, Petropavlovsk. Erosion has produced a ribbed surface on the eastern flanks of the 3456-m-high volcano; the youngest lava flows are found on the upper western flank and below SE-flank cinder cones. No strong explosive eruptions have been documented during the Holocene. Extensive Holocenefissure vents about 3900-3500 years ago reached Avacha Bay. Only a few moderate explosive eruptions have occurred during historical lava fields on the western flank were primarily fed by summit vents; those on the SW flank originated from flank vents. Lahars associated with a period of lava effusion from south- and SW-flank time. Koryaksky’s first historical eruption, in 1895, also produced a lava flow. (Source: GVP).

Notes:

Based on information from the Tegucigalpa MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that ash was detected within 15 km of Fuego on 19 August. According to INSIVUMEH, rumbling sounds were accompanied by incandescent tephra ejected 75 m high on 21 August. (Source: GVP).

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [20 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 22, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 12 August-18 August 2009

VoW: Talang

Talang
The Indonesian volcano Talang on the island of Sumatra had been dormant for centuries when, in April 2005, it suddenly rumbled to life. A plume of smoke rose 1000 meters high and nearby villages were covered in ash. Fearing a major eruption, local authorities began evacuating 40,000 people. Caption: James A. Phillips, NASA.

And just to confuse the readers a little, the following caption is by volcano.oregonstate.edu

Talang is a stratovolcano with 8 confirmed eruptions between 1833 and 1968. The volcano may have had a phreatic eruption in 1986 but the activity has not been confirmed. Most of the eruptions are moderate in size (VEI=2) and explosive. Eruptions in 1833, 1843, 1845, and 1876 were from flank vents. An eruption in 1967 and two different eruptions in 1968 were from radial fissures. The distance from the city of Padang to Talang is about 35 km. Image courtesy of the Landsat Pathfinder Project.

TALANG
Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Last Known Eruption: 2007
Summit Elevation: 2,597 m (8,520 feet)
Latitude: 0.978°S  (0°58’42″S)
Longitude:  100.679°E (100°40’46″E)
Source: GVP


Talang, which forms a twin volcano with the extinct Pasar Arbaa volcano, lies ESE of the major city of Padang and rises NW of Dibawah Lake. Talang has two crater lakes on its flanks; the largest of these is 1 x 2 km wide Danau Talang. Most historical eruptions have not occurred from the summit of the volcano, which lacks a crater. Historical eruptions from Gunung Talang volcano have mostly involved small-to-moderate explosive activity first documented in the 19th century that originated from a series of small craters in a valley on the upper NE flank. Photo by Ruska Hadian, 1986 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Caption: GVP.

Authorities raise Mt. Talang alert level to highest

The vulcanology and disaster mitigation office in West Sumatra has raised the alert status for Mt. Talang to the highest level following a 6.9-magnitude earthquake and a series of aftershocks that struck the province.

Vulcanologist Dalipa Marjusi said Tuesday the tremors had sparked a volcanic earthquake and temblors, although eruption of the volcano remained undetected.

“Since Sunday’s earthquake we have recorded 1,600 volcanic quakes and 700 tectonic quakes, but only 23 of them were felt,” Dalipa said.

Fog has blanketed the summit of the 2,597-meter volcano for the last two days, making it difficult to see ash or lava that might be erupting from its crater.

The volcano last spewed hot ash last April.

A seven-strong team from the directorate general of vulcanology and disaster mitigation have arrived in Padang from Bandung to monitor the volcano’s activities.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/18/authorities-raise-mt-talang-alert-level-highest.html


Talang is the 6th listed volcano from top left.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Notes:

IG reported that on 4 August seismicity from Reventador increased and periods of tremor frequently saturated the seismic stations. On 6 August, incandescent blocks were ejected from the crater. Thermal images revealed a linear area of higher temperatures, confirming the presence of a new lava flow on the S flank.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 14 August a 2-hour-long thermal anomaly detected over Pagan was followed by a small emission. The emission, hotter than its surroundings, drifted NW and quickly dissipated. [Source: GVP]

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [13 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 14, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report:  5  – 11 August 2009

VoW: Kilauea

Kilauea
Since the vent collapse in late June, Kilauea’s summit plume had been wispy, translucent and low in SO2 content, resulting in improved air quality in Kona and Ka‘u. However, the summit vent has picked up in activity again this week. (Photo courtesy of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory). Source: Click Here.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [30 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 30, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 22 July – 28 July 2009

VOW: Batu Tara

batu tara July 27 2009
Batu Tara remained active in late July 2009. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this photo-like image the volcano releasing a faint plume on July 27, 2009. The distinct segments of the plume suggest that the volcano has released ash and/or steam in pulses. The plume blows toward the northwest over the Flores Sea.  NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

batutara EO 18 may 2009
Batu Tara remained active in mid-May 2009. On May 17, 2009, as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image, the tiny volcanic island released a plume of ash and/or steam. The volcano’s plume forms a counter-clockwise arc north of the volcano. East of that plume is another, fainter plume, almost certainly of the same origin, blowing westward over the Flores Sea. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Notes:

KVERT reported that during 17-18 and 20-24 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. According to news sources, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. late on 25 July. Increased seismicity, powerful ash bursts, and avalanches were also reported.

Based on information from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 July explosions from Sakura-jima produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE. On 23 July and 27 July pilots observed ash plumes. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [9 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 9, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 1 July – 8 July 2009

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

NOTES: A large sulfur dioxide plume and several thermal anomalies from Manda Hararo were detected in satellite imagery during 28-30 June. On 8 July, a scientist that visited the area reported fresh lava flows, an eruptive fissure that was about 5 km long, and gas emitting from multiple cones.

According to news articles, PHIVOLCS implemented increased monitoring of Mayon after a recent rise in seismicity. Incandescence in the crater and a slight increase in sulfur dioxide gas output over background levels were also noted. (Source: GVP)

MANDA HARARO Northeastern Africa 12.17°N, 40.82°E; summit elev. 600+ m


Steam rises from new fissures that fed lava flows at the Manda Hararo complex, as seen on August 20, 2007. The Manda Hararo complex is the southernmost axial range of western Afar. The massive complex is 105 km long and 20-30 km wide, and represents an uplifted segment of a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. Voluminous fluid lava flows issued from NNW-trending fissures of the Ethiopian rift. Photo courtesy of Gezahegn Yirgu, 2007 (Addis Ababa University). Caption: GVP.

A large sulfur dioxide plume and several thermal anomalies from Manda Hararo were detected in satellite imagery during 28-30 June. Thermal anomalies detected in satellite imagery indicated a surface lava flow in the Karbahi region. Karbahi is a graben area with numerous active faults, fissures, and basalt flows, NW of the center of the broad Manda Hararo volcanic complex. Preliminary data suggested that the eruption was larger than the previous eruption in August 2007. On 8 July, a scientist that visited the area reported fresh lava flows, an eruptive fissure that was about 5 km long, and gas emitting from multiple cones.


A steaming volcanic vent in the Afar desert. The black basalt rock erupted onto the surface on 28 June and now covers an area of 10 square kilometres. Photograph: Talfan Barnie, University of Cambridge via Guardian Science Blog. Image may be subject to copyright.

Geologic Summary. The southernmost axial range of western Afar, the Manda Hararo complex is located in the Kalo plain, SSE of Dabbahu volcano. The massive complex is 105 km long and 20-30 km wide, and represents an uplifted segment of a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. A small basaltic shield volcano is located at the northern end of the complex, south of which is an area of abundant fissure-fed lava flows. Two basaltic shield volcanoes, the largest of which is Unda Hararo, occupy the center of the complex. The dominant part of the complex lies to the south, where the Gumatmali-Gablaytu fissure system is located. Voluminous fluid lava flows issued from these NNW-trending fissures, and solidified lava lakes occupy two large craters. Lava flows from the Gablaytu and Manda shield volcanoes overlie 8000-year-old sediments. Hot springs and fumaroles occur around Daorre lake. The first historical eruption from Manda Hararo produced fissure-fed lava flows in 2007. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates

Alaska Volcano Observatory Update: July 09, 2009 0105 UTC

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

  • Cleveland Activity – Color Code – YELLOW : Alert Level – ADVISORY

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE: Wednesday, July 8, 2009  18:14 UTC

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

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Volcano Watch: 3 February 2009

Posted by feww on February 5, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 28 January-3 February 2009

From: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New Activity/Unrest:

Volcano of the Week: Ubinas


Volcán Ubinas, seen here from the west, is Perú’s most active volcano. A small, 1.2-km-wide caldera that cuts the top of Ubinas gives it a truncated appearance. The upper slopes of the stratovolcano steepen to nearly 45 degrees. The steep-walled, 150-m-deep caldera contains an ash cone with a 500-m-wide funnel-shaped vent that is 200-m deep. Holocene lava flows are visible on the volcano’s flanks, but historical activity, documented since the 16th century, has consisted of intermittent minor explosive eruptions. Photo by Norm Banks, 1988 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP

Volcano Name: Ubinas

Country: Perú
Volcano Type:  Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 2008 (in or after)
Summit Elevation: 5672 m
(18,609 feet)
Latitude: 16.355°S
16°21’18″S
Longitude: 70.903°W
70°54’11″W

Based on a SIGMET notice, the Buenos Aires VAAC reported that on 31 January an ash plume from Ubinas rose to an altitude of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Ash was not seen on satellite imagery.

Ongoing Activity:

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