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Archive for the ‘Volcanic Explosions’ Category

Mt. Bulusan major ash explosion forces evacuation

Posted by feww on February 21, 2011

Mt. Bulusan massive ash explosion covers 3 cities, 41 villages

Philippines Mt Bulusan volcano erupted again Monday at 01:12UTC showering at least three towns with large quantities of ash.


The ash explosion as seen from the town of Irosin, about 600km SE of Manila, Philippines. Bulusan Volcano is located in Sorsogon province in Bicol region. Credit AP. Image may be subject to copyright.

A massive ash plume from the 1,560-m volcano drifted south covering the town of Irosin (population: 46,000), according to a civil defense operations official.

“There’s zero visibility at Irosin at the moment, and we can’t get in touch with officials there,” he told AFP.

A state volcanologist told AFP that explosion sounds were followed by an ash column that rose by up to  2.5km (1.6 miles) above the crater.


Map of the Philippines Volcanoes. Click image to enlarge.

“The huge plume of grayish smoke shot up to more than a mile (2 kilometers) toward the blue sky, with the ash drifting southwest toward four farming towns in Sorsogon province, where about 1,200 villagers fled to emergency shelters and houses of relatives, said Benito Ramos, who heads the government’s disaster-response agency.” AP reported.

“Volcanic ash has fallen in the towns of Casiguran and Juban, located at the foot of the volcano. Philippine troops will be evacuating some 1,000 residents from these two towns,” Xinhua quoted an official as saying.

The explosion at Bulusan volcano lasted for 19 minutes, starting at 09:12 local time (01:12UTC) and has since affected at least 100,000 people in 3 towns and 41 villages in the surrounding areas, the National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council said.

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Posted in Philippines volcanoes, Taal Volcano, volcanic event, Volcanic Explosions, volcano | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

3 Explosions Heard at Krakatau Volcano

Posted by feww on November 14, 2010

More Volcanic Unrest in Indonesia

Villagers flee after Krakatau explodes 3 times


Krakatau Erption in 2008. Credit: Thomas.Schiet. Click image to enlarge.

About 1,000 Villagers fled the area after three loud explosions were heard from Mount Anak Krakatau, reports say.

“We received information that the number of earthquakes increased to 933 on Friday. This is harmless as long as the villagers still stay at least two kilometers away,” Anto Pambudi, head of the team observing Mt. Anak Krakatau said.

The alert status for the volcano has now been raised to “caution.”


Mt Krakatau, Sinabung and Merapi Volcanoes Location Map
. Source of the original map: USGS. Map enhanced by Fire-Earth. Click image to enlarge.


Krakatau Islands Location Map. Original map enhanced by Fire-Earth.

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The Island Map (Simkin and Fiske, 1983). Image may be subject to copyright.

landsat PP1
Krakatau Image by Landsat Pathfinder Project (Dated May 18, 1992)

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William Ashcroft painting “On the Banks of the River Thames” in London, November 26, 1883 [Exactly three months after Krakatoa’s cataclysmic 1883 eruption.]

The Krakatoa eruption affected the climate driving the weather patterns wild for the next 5 years. Average global temperatures fell by about 1.2 °C in the following years, returning to normal only in 1888.

The violent explosions [August 27, 1883]

Krakatoa is a volcanic island in the Sunda Strait located between Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra. Both the volcano and island group share the same name.

Four enormous explosions almost entirely destroyed Krakatoa island on August 27, 1883. The violent explosions were reportedly heard in Perth, Western Australia,  some 3,500 km away. It was heard even on the island of Rodrigues near Mauritius, about 4,800 km away.

The shockwave from the last explosion, which ejected volcanic matter 80 km into the atmosphere, echoed around the planet seven times.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

The eruption ejected about 21 cubic kilometers of volcanic matter and completely destroyed two-thirds of the Krakatoa island.

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Posted in Indonesia volcanoes, Krakatau, Krakatau explosion, volcanic earthquake, Volcanic Explosions, volcanic unrest | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch [10 June 2010]

Posted by msrb on June 10, 2010

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (2 June – 8 June 2010)

  • Bezymianny, Central Kamchatka (Russia)  [Group J]
  • Cleveland, Chuginadak Island  [Group H]
  • Pacaya, Guatemala  [Group F]
  • Taal, Luzon   [Group K]
  • Tiatia, Kunashir Island (Kuril Islands, Russia)   [Group J]
  • Tungurahua, Ecuador  [Group D]
  • Ulawun, New Britain [Group K]


Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Volcanic Activity:

For additional information, see source.

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Posted in volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, Volcanic Explosions, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Volcanic Explosions Could Split More Than Africa

Posted by feww on November 4, 2009

Volcanic Explosions and Large Earthquakes Could Splinter Several Continents, Countries

Large earthquakes and volcanic explosions could split Arabian Plate, North American Plate, Pacific Plate [in multiple places] and shatter Filipino Plate.


Erta Ale, an active shield volcano located in the Afar Region [northeastern] of Ethiopia in the Danakil Desert, is Ethiopia’s only active volcano.License: cc-by-sa-2.0. Credit: posted to Flickr by filippo_jean.

Erta Ale is part of the so-called Afar Triangle, a highly active volcanic region which includes Dabbahu Volcano, located in the remote Afar Region of Ethiopia. Dabbahu eruption in 2005 created a large fissure in the ground, called the Dabbahu fissure. The volcano is the hottest place on Earth’s  surface.

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Dabbahu Fissure. Image JPL/NASA.

Leading to Dabbahu’s only known eruption in recorded history, which formed a 500 meter long fissure and a 30 meter wide pumice cone at the fissure’s southern end, on September 26, 2005 the ground swelled as a cluster of more than 130 tremors shook the area near the volcano.

dabbahu fissure
Dabbahu Fissure, along the Somalian Plate, Great Rift Valley (Boina/Afar, Danakil desert, Ethiopia). A ground rupture created during the September 2005 rifting event. Photo: Tony Philpotts/ AP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Researchers say volcanic activity could split the African continent in two, a claim supported by a recent ground rupture that appeared in northeastern Ethiopia.

The 60-kilometre (35-mile) split in the desolate Afar region, which was the result of two volcanic eruptions in September 2005 [Dabbahu Episode, Afar,]  has enabled scientists to further examine the earth’s tectonic movements, said a report published in the Geophysical Research Letters.

“The significance of the finding is that a huge magnetic deformation can happen within a few days like in oceans,” Atalay Arefe, an Ethiopia-based university professor who was part of the study, told AFP in an interview.

Faults and fissures that normally occur on the ocean floor largely contribute to the continents breaking off  and moving away [spreading] from each other, in the same way African continent broke away from South American plate 100 million years ago.

“Normally, such phenomena happens beneath the ocean, which is inaccessible, expensive and very difficult to make experiments. But in Afar, it’s quite a natural laboratory for us to carry those out,” Atalay said.

Atalay, who was part of an international group of scientists who have been undertaking studies since the eruptions, said the event indicated what was likely to happen in the mainland.

“The ocean’s formation is happening slowly, likely to take a few million years. It will stretch from the Afar depression (straddling Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti) down to Mozambique,” he said.

At 120 meter below sea level, Ethiopia’s Afar Depression is one of the lowest and hottest places on Earth, famous for its salt mines.

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Posted in Arabian Plate, filipino plate, Gulf of aden rift, large earthquakes, Nubian Plate, red sea drift, Somalian plate, Volcanic Explosions | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »