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Archive for the ‘Volcano Hazard’ Category

Kilauea Lava Flow Could Affect Thousands on Hawaiʻi Island

Posted by feww on September 5, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARDS
STATE OF EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION
MASS EVACUATIONS
LOSS OF HABITAT
CROP DESTRUCTION
SCENARIOS 787, 444, 070, 047, 017, 07, 02
.

Lava from Kilauea Volcano advancing 250 meters per day

Hawai‘i County Mayor has signed a state of emergency proclamation due to  the advancing lava flow in the Wao Kele O Puna area after the flow extended to less than 1.5km from the edge of the Ka‘ohe Homesteads subdivision, said the mayor’s office.

It’s believed that at least 8,211 people (based on 2010 Census) residing in the subdivision of Hawaiian Beaches are directly threatened by the lava flow. However, the number is unrepresentative of the present population since the District of Puna is the fastest growing population in the State, said the Mayor’s Proclamation.

“We are taking this step to ensure our residents have time to prepare their families, their pets, and their livestock for a safe and orderly evacuation from Ka‘ohe in the event the flow continues to advance,” said Mayor Kenoi.

No evacuation orders have yet been issued, said Hawaii County Civil Defense; however, the risk of lava flow affecting the  subdivision is increasing daily.

Kilauea Volcano Warning Issued by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)

Thursday, September 4, 2014, 10:45 AM HST (2014-09-04 @ 20:45UTC)

Volcanic Activity Summary: On June 27, 2014, new vents opened on the northeast flank of the Pu‘u ‘O‘o cone that fed a narrow lava flow to the east-northeast. On August 18, the flow entered a ground crack, traveled underground for several days, then resurfaced to form a small lava pad. The sequence was repeated twice more over the following days with lava entering other cracks and reappearing farther downslope. In this way, the flow had advanced approximately 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent, or to within 1.3 km (0.8 miles) of the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, by the afternoon of September 3. Overnight, lava did not appear to advance farther east within the crack system, but surface flows advanced about 100 m to the northeast. At the average rate of advancement of 250 m/day (820 ft/day) since July 10, we project that lava could reach the Kaohe Homesteads boundary within 5-7 days should lava resume advancing within the crack system.

Kaohe Homesteads is located between the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve and the town of Pāhoa in the Puna District of the County of Hawai`i.

Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Recent Observations:
[Volcanic cloud height] SO2, low ash emissions continue from Kīlauea caldera, TFR in place.
[Other volcanic cloud information] none
[Lava flow/dome] June 27th Lava Flow continues to advance.

Hazard Analysis:
[Lava flow/dome] Lava Flow from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent could advance to Kaohe Homesteads within a week.

Remarks: The Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent in the East Rift Zone of Kīlauea Volcano began erupting on January 3, 1983, and has continued erupting for more than 31 years, with the majority of lava flows advancing to the south. Over the past two years, lava flows have issued from the vent toward the northeast. The June 27th flow is the most recent of these flows and the first to threaten a residential area since 2010-2011.

June 27th lava flow front reemerges from ground crack, continues advancing eastward (HVO)


The June 27th lava flow remains active, with lava at the flow front issuing from a ground crack and advancing through thick forest, creating dense plumes of smoke. The farthest lava this afternoon was 13.2 km (8.2 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 1.3 km (0.8 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve. This forest reserve boundary is at the western boundary of Kaohe Homesteads subdivision, a portion of which is visible at the bottom of the photograph. (Source: HVO)


The surface flows at the front of the June 27th lava flow are fed by lava that is supplied through a lava tube that originates at the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. This thermal image shows the lava tube close to Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Although the lava is several meters (yards) beneath the surface, it heats the surface sufficiently to be easily detected with thermal cameras. 

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Significant Earthquake Strikes Bardarbunga System

Posted by feww on August 31, 2014

VOLCANIC SEISMICITY
FISSURE ERUPTION
BARDARBUNGA VOLCANO
SCENARIOS 023, 017, 09, 08, 07
.

M5.1 quake occurs at northern rim of  Bardarbunga caldera: IMO

Centered at 64.675°N, 17.415°W, about 6.6km NE of Bardarbunga, the quake occurred at a depth of 5.2 km [USGS/EHP: 64.723°N 17.390°W depth=7.5km] on Sunday at 12:01:45GMT, said Iceland Met Office (IMO).

The quake was the largest to strike Bardarbunga volcanic system since a magnitude 5.4 shock on Saturday.

Meantime, a large fissure eruption continues in Holuhraun lava field, north of Vatnajokull [Glacier of Lakes.]

“A lava eruption started in Holuhraun shortly after 04 AM, on the same volcanic fissure, which erupted earlier this week. The fissure is estimated to be 1.5 km long.”

The lava extruding from the fissure was estimated at 1 km wide, 3 km long and several meters deep, oozing down in a northeasterly direction. The flow rate was about 1,000 m3 per second, said IMO.

The Aviation Color Code for Bárðarbunga has been downgraded from “red” to “orange” [because no ash has been detected] and the alert level for Askja to “yellow,” said IMO.

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Sakurajima Ejects Massive Column of Ash

Posted by feww on June 7, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIOS 07, 070
.

Volcanic Activity Continues at Japan’s Sakurajima

Sakurajima’s eruption on Friday was the most powerful one at the volcano since last month when the volcano spewed large columns of ash with rivers of lava flowing in the direction of nearby Ibusiki City.

Ash clouds from Mt. Sakurajima explosion reached a height of 4,500 meters,  the second-highest since 1955. A record of 5,000 meters was set in 2013.

Ash fall was reported late Friday evening in areas southeast of the volcano.

One of the most active volcanoes in the world, Sakurajima is located in Kagoshima Bay, southern Kyushu, Japan (about 1,100km WSW of Tokyo). The composite volcano has three peaks: Kitadake, Nakadake and Minamidake (southern peak).

Mt. Sakurajima- kagoshima obsrv 6-6-14
Mt. Sakurajima Eruption on June 6, 2014. Photo credit: Kagoshima Meteorological Observatory

Ongoing Eruptions

Since 1955 the Minamidake crater has been continually active. The ongoing activity includes strong strombolian to ash explosions at least once and as many as 8 times a day.

The volcano was placed under a Level 3 (orange) alert by the Japan Meteorological Agency on March 21, 2012.

Level 3 (orange) alert means the volcano is active (do not approach crater).

A major lava flow in 1914 connected the volcano island  to the Osumi Peninsula on the Kyushu Island.

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Alaska Flights Grounded amid Continued Activity at Pavlof

Posted by feww on June 5, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIO 07
.

Regional Airline Cancels Alaska Flights

Plumes of smoke, steam and ash from Pavlof continue to reach heights  of about 7,500m (24,000 feet),  according to Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO).

Meantime, PenAir, a regional airline, canceled flights from Anchorage to  Cold Bay and Dutch Harbor on the Aleutian Islands on Wednesday.

pavlof 3jun14
Pavlof eruption with lava fountaining, early June 3, 2014, as viewed from Cold Bay. Photo credit: AVO/ Robert Stacy.

So far, no ash has reached any of local communities, according to AVO.

LAST ACTIVITY REPORT: ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

Thursday, June 5, 2014 5:16 AM AKDT (Thursday, June 5, 2014 13:16 UTC)
UPDATED by FIRE-EARTH at 13:35UTC

PAVLOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312030)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Two strong explosions were recorded in seismic data early this morning (10:05 and 10:45 UTC; 02:05 and 02:45 AKDT) at Pavlof. Lightning was detected by the WWLLN system but there is no indication of higher altitude ash in satellite data. Meteorological cloud tops are up to 29,000 ft. ASL and winds are to the west-southwest.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014 12:14 PM AKDT (Wednesday, June 4, 2014 20:14 UTC)

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Seismicity remains stable and unchanged in the past 24 hours. Persistent elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images. FAA web camera views yesterday afternoon showed a towering steam plume above the vent and lower-level ash from pyroclastic flow activity on the north flank. Wind direction has shifted in the past 24 hours to a more westerly direction and recent satellite views show a plume rich in SO2 gas, steam, and minor ash extending variably between 30 and 100 km downwind and passing over Cold Bay. There have been no reports of ash fall in Cold Bay or any other community. Incandescence from lava fountaining was visible in early morning web camera images, however low-level weather clouds obscure more recent views.

Alerts at Other Alaska Volcanoes

  • Shishaldin: Color Code: ORANGE/ Alert Level WATCH
  • Cleveland: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY
  • Veniaminof: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

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Mass Evacuation Ordered after UBINAS Eruption

Posted by feww on April 18, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
STATE OF EMERGENCY
MASS EVACUATIONS
.

Ubinas Volcano spews 3.2km-high plumes of toxic ash

Some 4,000 residents and more than 40,000 animals are being evacuated to a “safety zone” about  20km from Peru’s most active volcano.

Villagers are concerned for the health of their livestock, a major source of income. “In the district of Ubinas alone, there are an estimated 40,000 llamas and alpacas.” A significant percentage of these animals could be seriously affected by the silica ash, which  contaminates their grazing areas after each significant eruption, local sources have said.

The silica ash from the  eruption damages crops, polluting water sources, and threatening villagers and their livestock.

“The Ollanta Humala’s administration declared a state of emergency in nearby provinces, which will provide financial assistance for those affected by eruption of the Ubinas volcano, in southern Peru’s Arequipa region,” reported Andina news agency.

A major eruption in 2006 forced mass evacuations and killed livestock that consumed ash-contaminated fodder, said the report.

ubinas
Ubinas Volcano erupted multiple times in September 2013 after three years of dormancy. Image credit: ANDINA

The massive 5,670-meter volcano is located about 70 kilometers from the city of Arequipa (metro pop: ~ 1,260,000), and 1,250km south of the capital Lima, close to the country’s Pacific coast, about  230 km east of the Peru-Chile trench and about 150 km above the Benioff-Wadati plane, where the Nazca plate is subducting under the continental part of the South American Plate.

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Volcano Erupts in Ogasawara Islands

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

Warning issued to Pacific shipping after volcano erupts, forming a new Island

Authorities have warned shipping in the Pacific Ocean to maintain vigilance for airborne volcanic material after a volcano erupted near one of the Ogasawara Islands, some 1,000 kilometers south of Tokyo, NHK reported Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) as saying.

Japan Coast Guard has confirmed black smoke spewing out of a new land mass about 500 meters southeast of Nishinoshima island, JMA said

Video footage shows a plume of black and white smoke and steam  rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new landmass measuring about 200 meters across.

Ogasawara - new island formed from volcanic eruption
Black and white smoke and steam rising to a height of more than 600 meters above a new 200-m long landmass created by volcanic eruption near Nishino shima, Bonin Islands, south of Japan. Screenshot from NHK news video clip.

new volcanic island
Screenshot  from NHK news video clip.

“The agency says multiple clusters of white smoke overhead suggest intermittent explosions,” said the report.

Volcanic activity created a new island which was fused to the uninhabited Nishinoshima between 1973 and 1974, the last time when eruptions occurred near the island.


Location Map of Volcano Islands, Ogasawara Islands, Japan region. Image credit: Lim Tor


Bonin Islands (aka, Ogasawara Group, in Japan).  Click Image to Enlarge.

In 2010, one of the volcanoes in the region erupted, spewing smoke and ash to a height of about about 100 meters above the sea level. The surrounding sea area changed to a greenish-yellow color with nearby areas turning cloudy.

JMA said the volcano, called Fukutokuokanoba, had erupted seven times since 1904, forming ephemeral islands (temporary land masses) on three occasions, all of which later sank below the ocean surface.

The first known ephemeral island called Shin-Iwo-jima (New Sulfur Island) was formed in 1904, and the most recent in 1986.

What the Volcano Islands Look Like


North Iwo Jima Island (Official Japanese name Kita-iōtō, but commonly known as Kita-iōjima, meaning “north sulfur island”) is the northernmost island of the Volcano Islands cluster of the Ogasawara Islands, about 1175 km south of Tokyo. Image Credit: Chisatos

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Red Alert at Copahue Volcano: Argentina and Chile Order Evacuation

Posted by feww on May 28, 2013

Chile and Argentina order evacuation of 3,000 people living near Copahue

Argentine and Chilean authorities have issued a red alert, fearing that the volcano could erupt imminently.

The mandatory evacuation order covers all residents living within a 25-km radius of Copahue.

The 2,965m tall volcano began spewing volcanic gasses Friday amid heightened seismic activity, with volcanic tremors occurring at an average rate of about 450 per hour.

Copahue volcano sits in the Biobio region of Chile, straddling the border with Argentina’s Neuquen province.

copahue
This photo released by the Government of Neuquen, Monday, May 27, 2013, shows a plume of ash and smoke rise from the Copahue volcano, as seen from Caviahue, in the Argentine province of Neuquen, Friday, May 24, 2013.  (AP Photo/Government of Neuquen, Tony Huglich)

[NOTE: The most probable outcome over the next 96 hours or so can be deduced from the photo.]

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El Hierro Island Experiencing Intense Seismicity, Inflation

Posted by feww on March 31, 2013

El Hierro moving east, experiencing uplift amid intense seismic activity

Intense seismicity and inflation at El Hierro suggest magma is intruding underneath the tiny volcanic island, the smallest of Canary Islands, located  in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa (population ~ 10,000).

  • Sharp increase in seismic activity in and around the tiny island (Area: ~ 278 km2) began on March 18, with the largest quake measuring 4.7 on Richter scale, which occurred on Friday.
  • The majority of tremors are occurring at a depth of between 12 and 15 km.
  • The latest geological activities have caused the island to move east and forced the ground to rise by 11 cm at Punta de Orchilla on the western tip of the island.

Map of El Hierro with recent quake epicenters

Recent quakes at El Hierro
Image Credit: AVCAN. AVCAN.ORG was developed by Victor Tapia. Original idea, administration and all rights by Fernando Raja

Recent Seismicity at El Hierro
Histogram of the recent earthquakes at El Hierro 18 -31 March, 2013. Note sharp increase in seismic activity since March 18, 2013. Image credit: AVCAN.

El Hierro - latest quakes
Latest Earthquake at El Hierro. Image credit: AVCAN.

Global Volcano Watch (Source: AVO; HVO; GVP)

New Activity/Unrest:

  • Fuego, Guatemala (Lava fountains rising to 400 m above the crater reported on 20 March, causing 1.5 km long lava stream in the Ceniza drainage).
  • Hekla, Southern Iceland
  • Tungurahua, Ecuador

Ongoing Activity:

U.S. Volcanoes

  • Kilauea, Hawaii  (Hawaii) – Code ORANGE – WATCH
  • Cleveland Volcano (Alaska) – Code YELLOW – ADVISORY

Kamchatka Peninsula

  • Gorely – Code YELLOW
  • Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia) – Code ORANGE
  • Kizimen, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia) –  Code ORANGE
  • Tolbachik, Central Kamchatka (Russia)  Code ORANGE
  • Bezymianny – Code YELLOW
  • Sheveluch Central Kamchatka (Russia) – Code ORANGE

Indonesia

  • Batu Tara, Komba Island (Indonesia)
  • Lokon-Empung, Sulawesi
  • Paluweh, Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)

Kurile Islands

  • Snow – Code YELLOW
  • Ivan Grozny – Code YELLOW

Other Volcanoes

  • Bagana, Bougainville (PNG)
  • Popocatépetl, México
  • Sakura-jima, Kyushu (Japan)
  • Santa María, Guatemala

Total: 21 volcanoes

Recent Volcano News

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‘Red’ Alert at Copahue Volcano

Posted by feww on December 24, 2012

Copahue volcano activity could intensify

Authorities in Argentina and Chile have raised the alert at Copahue volcano  in Biobio region to the highest level after detecting continued seismic activity on Sunday.

Copahue volcano
A column of ash and smoke from Copahue volcano rises above the town of Caviahue, a popular ski resort in Neuquen province, Argentina, some 1500 km SW of the capital Buenos Aires. Photo: AFP. Image may be subject to copyright. 

  • Copahue first erupted on Saturday, showering ash on nearby villages and prompting many to evacuate.
  • “The intensity of seismic signals suggests the eruption in progress is on the smaller side [however] we cannot discount the possibility that the activity could turn into a larger eruption,” said a spokesman for the Chilean Geology and Mining Services.
  • The 2,970-meter volcano is in SW Argentina’s Neuquen province, near the Chilean border.
  • About 3,000 people live in the vicinity of the massive volcano, including  the residents of Copahue, the town of Caviahue and indigenous Mapuche communities.
  • The ash plume rose  to a height of about 1.5km (5,000ft) above the crater, said Chile’s emergency office (ONEMI).

Related Links:

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

GLOBAL WARNING

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic earthquake, volcanic eruptions, volcanism report, volcano alert, volcano eruption, Volcano Hazard, volcano images, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

33 volcanic tremors rock Mt. Bulusan

Posted by feww on November 22, 2010

Bulusan ejects a 2-km column of ash and steam into the air

At least 500 families have been evacuated from areas near the volcano. About 3,000 families (15,000 people) in 18 villages have so far been affected by the ash eruptions.

Mt. Bulusan remains under Alert Level 1 that prohibits the public from entering  the 4-km radius of the Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ).

Meanwhile the  municipal council in the town of Sorsogon has declared “a state of calamity” following  repeated ash eruptions from Bulusan Volcano and threats of lahars and  pyroclastic flows into the local rivers.

The ash explosions from  Bulusan Volcano has already “affected Barangays (villages) Cogon, Monbon, Tinampo, Bolos, Gulang-Gulang, Bagsangan, Mapaso and Gabao and the rivers of Patag and Cadac-an in this town,” according to a report.


Mount Bulusan ash explosions shower Sorsogon town in Bicol region south of Manila, Philippines on 21 November 2010. Photo credit:  EPA/ALDRIN RECEBIDO. Image may be subject to copyright.

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Latest Entries on Mt Merapi

More Volcano Links


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Mt Merapi Erupts Again, 70,000 Evacuated

Posted by feww on November 1, 2010

Java’s Mount Merapi volcano erupted again forcing up to 70,000 to evacuate


Mount Merapi volcano spews smoke as seen from Sidorejo village in Klaten, near Yogyakarta November 1, 2010. REUTERS/Beawiharta. Image may be subject to copyright.

Merapi’s latest eruption on Monday, the third in a week, ejecting  a dense plume of ash cloud up into the air to a height of about 1.5 km, local volcanologists reported.

Two other volcanoes, Mount Anak Krakatau (Sunda strait) and Mount Sinabung (North Sumatra), are also showing signs of increased activity, they said.

Major Volcanoes of Indonesia



Mt Sinabung, Krakatoa and Merapi Volcanoes Location Map
. Source of the original map: USGS. Map enhanced by Fire-Earth
. Click image to enlarge.

Videos and more images are available at: HVO

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FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Posted in environment, Krakatoa, Mount Merapi volcano, sumatra volcano, volcano, volcano erupts, Volcano Hazard, Volcano News | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

World’s Dormant Volcanoes Firing

Posted by feww on September 12, 2010

The Pace of  Global Volcanism Accelerating; More Dormant Volcanoes Becoming Active

In the next few years you could have dozens of volcanoes erupting simultaneously.

VolcanoWatch Weekly [12 Sept 2010]

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report [Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (1 September –  7 September 2010)

  • Ekarma, Kuril Islands (Russia)  — [Group J]
  • Etna, Sicily (Italy)  — [Group B]
  • Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia) — [Group J]
  • Manam, Northeast of New Guinea (SW Pacific) — [Group K]
  • Planchón-Peteroa, Central Chile-Argentina border — [Group D]
  • Seulawah Agam, Sumatra (Indonesia) — [Group K]
  • Sinabung, Sumatra (Indonesia) — [Group K]
  • Villarrica, Central Chile — [Group D]

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Volcano Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [16 July 2010]

Posted by feww on July 16, 2010

Manam Volcano Puffs Out a Small Plume


Manam Volcano released a small plume on June 16, 2010, which was captured by ALI on NASA’s EO-1 satellite.  Source: NASA E/O.

The 1,807-m Manam, one of Papua New Guinea most active volcanoes, last erupted in 2009, is a  basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano forming a 10-km wide island, located about 13km off the coast of mainland PNG.

“Frequent historical eruptions, typically of mild-to-moderate scale, have been recorded at Manam since 1616. Occasional larger eruptions have produced pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached flat-lying coastal areas and entered the sea, sometimes impacting populated areas.” —GVP.

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (7 July – 13 July 2010)

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.

Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

Other Volcano Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch [25 June 2010]

Posted by feww on June 25, 2010

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (16 June – 22 June 2010)


Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

More Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano. Tagged: , , , ,

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Volcano Ash Threatens Ecuador’s Ambato City

Posted by feww on January 29, 2010

Ambato May Become a Ghost City

Tungurahua Volcano, “Throat of Fire,” Eruption Continues

Volcanic ash from Tungurahua volcano, which has been erupting for the past several weeks, has covered a wide area of central Ecuador, including provincial capital city of Ambato, authorities said.


Tungurahua volcano, located near Baños, Ecuador. Photo Credit: Martin Zeise, Berlin. SEE Official license. Click Image to enlarge.

Authorities fear that the volcanic ash from Tungurahua, will cause heavy crop loss as well as health problems.

“People have to protect their nose and eyes, because the volcanic dust causes problems in the respiratory system,” provincial health Director was quoted as saying.

However, most of the residents of Ambato, located in Ecuador’s central Andean valley, have ignored government advice to done masks, as they swept thick blankets of ash from the streets, health officials said, UPI reported.

“Since the reactivation of the volcano this year, this is the first time that the dust has fallen on the streets of the city,” a city official told Quito’s El Comercio newspaper.

Tungurahua, which means “Throat of Fire,” is located about  180 km south of Quito, capital city of Equador.

After a large eruption on Jan. 11, Tungurahua has continued to eject columns of ash reaching  as high as 4,000 meters above the summit. The volcano erupted more than 20 times on Wednesday, said Daniel Andrade of Ecuadorian Instituto Geofísico (the Institute of Geophysics).

City of Ambato

The city of Ambato (1°14′30″S, 78°37′11″W) lies in the valley of the Central Cordillera and is surrounded by snow-capped volcanoes including Carihuairazo, Cotopaxi, Tungurahua and Chimborazo, the largest mountain in Ecuador.

Ambato has an estimated population of 400,000, has been destroyed by earthquakes several times throughout its history, the last incident occurred on 5 August 1949.

The earthquake completely destroyed the entire city as well as 50 of surrounding towns and villages,  killing at least 6,000, and leaving hundreds of thousands homeless.

Ambato is also prone to seasonal flooding due to the Ambato River which divides the north side of the city.

Tungurahua erupted on May 16, 2006, covering the city in a thick blanket of ash.

Tungurahua Volcano
Country: Ecuador
Volcano Number: 1502-08=
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 2009
Summit Elevation: 5,023 m  (16,479 feet)
Latitude: 1.467°S  (1°28’1″S)
Longitude: 78.442°W  ( 78°26’30″W)
Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP)


Snow-capped Tungurahua, seen from near the town of Baños on its northern flank, rises 3,200 m above steep-walled canyons. Historical eruptions, separated by long reposes, have produced powerful explosions, sometimes accompanied by pyroclastic flows and lava flows. All historical eruptions have originated from the summit crater, and have typically lasted for several years. The largest historical eruptions took place in 1886, 1916, and 1918.  Photo by Minard Hall, 1976 (Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito). Caption: GVP.
Click Image to enlarge.


A break in the clouds enabled the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite to observe the eruption on January 23, 2010. As the satellite orbited overhead, a tan ash plume stretched 60 km (40 miles) to the southwest of the peak reaching an altitude of 27,000 feet (8,200 meters), more than 3,000 m (10,000 ft) above the 5,023 m (16,480 ft) summit. Observers from the Ecuadorian Instituto Geofísico reported lava fountains and lava blocks cascading down the flanks of the volcano, as well as loud booms and ashfall in the surrounding communities.
NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS RRT. Caption by Robert Simmon.  Edited by FEWW. Click Image to enlarge.

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [24 Dec 2009]

Posted by feww on December 24, 2009

VoW: Mayon


Mayon Volcano ejects a column of ash into air December 24, 2009. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo). Image may be subject to copyright.

For recent information on Mayon click links below:

SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(17 December – 23 December 2009)

New Activity/Unrest:

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

KVERT reported that a significant thermal anomaly from Bezymianny was detected in satellite imagery on 17 December. A few hours later a large explosive eruption produced ash plumes that were seen drifting as far as 350 km W and NW.


Ash from Bezymianny volcano covers a thick blanket of snow at Kozyrevsk village December 16-17, 2009. Credit: Yu. Demyanchuk/ KVERT.

Ongoing Activity

Chaitén, Southern Chile; Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka; Kilauea, Hawaii; Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia); Sakura-jima, Kyushu (Japan); Sangay, Ecuador;  Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia); Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan).


Strombolian activity and new lava flow at the eastern flank of Klyuchevskoy volcano on December 21, 2009. Credit: Yu. Demyanchuk/ KVERT.


State of Klyuchevskoy volcano on December 23, 2009.  Credit: Yu. Demyanchuk/ KVERT.

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FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Recent Posts on Chaitén:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [17 Dec 2009]

Posted by feww on December 17, 2009

VoW: Mayon

We would have liked to reprint a striking image of Mayon Volcano taken from space, and all that NASA had made available as of posting was this truly disappointing “turn-of-the-satellite” image:


Mt Mayon. Image Source: NASA. Click image to enlarge.

Click here for larger, but not necessarily any less disappointing image.

For recent information on Mayon click links below:

SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(2 December – 8 December 2009)

New activity/Unrest:

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

  • According to news articles, PHIVOLCS reported that on 14 December incandescence emanated from the lava dome in Mayon’s summit crater and incandescent material traveled as far as 3 km down the S and SE flanks. At least five minor explosions were detected by the seismic network.
  • According to a news article, INETER reported that an explosion of ash and gas from Concepción on 11 December produced a plume that rose 150 m above the crater.
  • OVPDLF reported that on 14 December an eruption from Piton de la Fournaise was preceded by a seismic crisis and summit deformation. Sub-parallel fissures along the rim of Dolomieu crater fed lava flows on the S slope.

Ongoing Activity

Chaitén, Southern Chile;  Dukono, Halmahera;  Fuego, Guatemala; Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka;  Kilauea, Hawaii; Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Manam, Northeast of New Guinea (SW Pacific);  Nevado del Huila, Colombia; Pacaya, Guatemala;  Rabaul, New Britain; Sakura-jima, Kyushu;  Santa María, Guatemala; Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan).

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FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Mayon Volcano Oozes Lava

Posted by feww on December 15, 2009

Mayon, Philippines most active volcano, oozes lava and ejects plumes of ash into the air

The Philippines Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, PHIVOLCS, raised the five-step alert to 3 after increased activity at Mayon volcano.

The authorities have evacuated thousands of residents from the 6-km (4 miles) permanent danger zone, which is now declared a prohibited area.

About 50,000 people live in an 8km (5 mile) radius of the mountain.


Lava cascades down the slopes of Mayon volcano in Legazpi city, Albay province, Monday Dec. 14, 2009.  (AP Photo/Nelson Salting). Image may be subject to copyright.


About 30,000 people were evacuated from the foot of Mt Mayon after the volcano spewed ash and lava in Albay province, the Philippines.  Photo:AFP. Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

Magma had been steadily rising at Mayon since late November and finally oozed out of the crater late Monday, and the activity at the volcano is expected to intensify, said PHILVOC.

If magma continues to push up the crater at a steady rate there would be lava flows, and “the possibility of an explosion.” PHILVOC reported.


Major Volcanoes of the Philippines Location Map. Click image to enlarge.

The 2467-meter Mayon Volcano is a stratovolcano [it is renowned for its almost perfectly conical shape] islocated about 15 kilometres northwest of Legazpi City [about 500 kilometers south of the capital, Manila,] in the province of Albay, Bicol Region, on the island of Luzon, in the Philippines.

Mayon is one of the 22 or so active volcanoes in the Philippines, and has caused the deaths of thousands of people and devastated several towns and villages in three major eruptions since its 1814. In 2006, after several eruptions, typhoon Durian triggered mudslides of volcanic ash on November 30, which buried  several villages near the foot of the mountain, killing about 1,000 people.

Fire Earth Moderators believe more volcanic activities at other Philippines volcanoes are highly probable in the near future. The volcanoes located on the island on Mindanao are particularly liable to erupt in the next 12 to 36 months.

The moderators also believe a large eruption may occur at Taal volcano. For other related forecast, see links below and search blog contents.

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Galeras Alert Level Raised to “Orange”

Posted by feww on December 11, 2009

Galeras Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

Colombia’s Galeras activity has intensified signifying an eruption may be imminent—INGEOMINAS


Galeras seen in this aerial photo (Undated). Source: Alaska Earthquake Information center. Image may be subject to copyright.

In June this year FEWW Forecast:

Galeras could erupt continually throughout 2009  and most of 2010 AND it hasn’t disappointed yet!

The Colombian Institute of Mining and Geology (INGEOMINAS), raised alert level Thursday to ‘Orange’ in the area near Galeras volcano, expecting it to erupt soon.

INGEOMINAS said Galeras activity has intensified signifying an eruption may be imminent within days or weeks. Adding that the volcano was showing recurrent episodes of intense seismic activity.

The authorities have evacuated about 8,000 residents from the hazard zones near the volcano.

In June 2009 Galeras volcano erupted twice in 24 hours , covering nearby villages in a blanket of volcanic ash.

Although the first eruption on Sunday June 7, 2009 caused no damage, the authorities ordered 8,000 residents to evacuate the surrounding villages.

The second explosion on Monday was the 8th eruption this year to shake the volcano, which is located in the Colombian department of Nariño near the town of  Pasto, and close to the Ecuadorean border.

Currently the most active volcano in Colombia, the 4,276-meter-high volcano’s first historical eruption occurred on December 7, 1580. The volcano resumed activity in 1988 after 10 years of dormancy. It erupted in 1993, killing nine people, three tourists and six scientists who had descended into the volcano’s crater to conduct tests.

galeras from Pasto stan williams
Galeras from Pasto (1993?). Photo by Stan Williams. Image may be subject to copyright.

Eight of Colombia’s 15 volcanoes have erupted in the last 100 years, and three of them since 1990: Galeras, Nevado del Huila, and Nevado del Ruiz.

An explosive eruption ruptured the summit of Nevado del Ruiz on November 13, 1985, spewing about 20 million cubic meters of volcanic ash and rocks into the air. Forty-meter thick lahars traveling at velocities of up to 50 kilometers per hour destroyed the town of Armero 74 km away from the explosion crater, killing more than 23,000 people. [Source: USGS]

Galeras activity in 2009

  • 14 February 19:11 an eruption spewed ash SO2 and other and volcanic gases. (Red Alert, Level I). [Pasto was covered in ash, 8,000 people evacuated.]
  • 20 February 07:05 spewed ashes. (Red Alert,  Level I).
  • 12 March 19:30, and 13 March 15:55 explosions were recorded (Orange Alert, Level II ).
  • 13 March 15:55, eruption occurred spewing gas and hot ashes at 16:34 further emission was recorded. (Orange Alert, Level II).
  • 24 April 07:32, two explosions were recorded. (Orange Alert, Level II).
  • 29 April monitors recorded increase in seismic activity. (Orange Alert, Level II).
  • 11 May 11:58, tectonic venting. (Orange Alert, Level II).
  • 17 May 21:40, seismic activity recorded. (Orange Alert, Level II).

For other episodes see:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [27 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 28, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 19 August – 25 August 2009

VOW: Koryaksky

koryaksky_amo_2009239
Koryaksky Volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula released a plume on August 27, 2009, caught by MODIS on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The volcano has released intermittent ash and/or steam plumes late August.

This true-color image shows a pale plume, which consists primarily of water vapor, blowing away from the summit east-northeast, toward the Bering Sea.

Vostok Media reported simultaneous activity at six Kamchatka volcanoes, describing  the first concurrent unrest in 60 years as rare. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott. [Edited by FEWW.]

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

KORYAKSKY Eastern Kamchatka 53.320°N, 158.688°E; summit elev. 3,456 m

KVERT reported that during 14-21 August seismic activity from Koryaksky was slightly above background levels. During 13-16 August, gas-and-steam plumes rose to altitudes of 3.5-5 km (11,500-16,400 ft) a.s.l. Based on visual observations during 16-20 August, gas-and-steam plumes containing ash rose to altitudes of 3.5-4.2 km (11,500-13,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted in multiple directions. Ash plumes were also seen in satellite imagery, drifting 215 km E and W. On 23 August, a probable ash plume detected in satellite imagery drifted 50 km ESE. During 24-25 August, seismicity increased; more than 100 earthquakes were recorded. The Level of Concern Color Code remained at Orange.

Geologic Summary. The large symmetrical Koryaksky stratovolcano is the most prominent landmark of the NW-trending Avachinskaya volcano group, which towers above Kamchatka’s largest city, Petropavlovsk. Erosion has produced a ribbed surface on the eastern flanks of the 3456-m-high volcano; the youngest lava flows are found on the upper western flank and below SE-flank cinder cones. No strong explosive eruptions have been documented during the Holocene. Extensive Holocenefissure vents about 3900-3500 years ago reached Avacha Bay. Only a few moderate explosive eruptions have occurred during historical lava fields on the western flank were primarily fed by summit vents; those on the SW flank originated from flank vents. Lahars associated with a period of lava effusion from south- and SW-flank time. Koryaksky’s first historical eruption, in 1895, also produced a lava flow. (Source: GVP).

Notes:

Based on information from the Tegucigalpa MWO, the Washington VAAC reported that ash was detected within 15 km of Fuego on 19 August. According to INSIVUMEH, rumbling sounds were accompanied by incandescent tephra ejected 75 m high on 21 August. (Source: GVP).

Ongoing Activity:

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FEWW Links:

Volcanic Activity Report, Volcano Hazard, VolcanoWatch, volcanism, volcanoes. Tagged: , , , , , , , .

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [20 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 22, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 12 August-18 August 2009

VoW: Talang

Talang
The Indonesian volcano Talang on the island of Sumatra had been dormant for centuries when, in April 2005, it suddenly rumbled to life. A plume of smoke rose 1000 meters high and nearby villages were covered in ash. Fearing a major eruption, local authorities began evacuating 40,000 people. Caption: James A. Phillips, NASA.

And just to confuse the readers a little, the following caption is by volcano.oregonstate.edu

Talang is a stratovolcano with 8 confirmed eruptions between 1833 and 1968. The volcano may have had a phreatic eruption in 1986 but the activity has not been confirmed. Most of the eruptions are moderate in size (VEI=2) and explosive. Eruptions in 1833, 1843, 1845, and 1876 were from flank vents. An eruption in 1967 and two different eruptions in 1968 were from radial fissures. The distance from the city of Padang to Talang is about 35 km. Image courtesy of the Landsat Pathfinder Project.

TALANG
Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Last Known Eruption: 2007
Summit Elevation: 2,597 m (8,520 feet)
Latitude: 0.978°S  (0°58’42″S)
Longitude:  100.679°E (100°40’46″E)
Source: GVP


Talang, which forms a twin volcano with the extinct Pasar Arbaa volcano, lies ESE of the major city of Padang and rises NW of Dibawah Lake. Talang has two crater lakes on its flanks; the largest of these is 1 x 2 km wide Danau Talang. Most historical eruptions have not occurred from the summit of the volcano, which lacks a crater. Historical eruptions from Gunung Talang volcano have mostly involved small-to-moderate explosive activity first documented in the 19th century that originated from a series of small craters in a valley on the upper NE flank. Photo by Ruska Hadian, 1986 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Caption: GVP.

Authorities raise Mt. Talang alert level to highest

The vulcanology and disaster mitigation office in West Sumatra has raised the alert status for Mt. Talang to the highest level following a 6.9-magnitude earthquake and a series of aftershocks that struck the province.

Vulcanologist Dalipa Marjusi said Tuesday the tremors had sparked a volcanic earthquake and temblors, although eruption of the volcano remained undetected.

“Since Sunday’s earthquake we have recorded 1,600 volcanic quakes and 700 tectonic quakes, but only 23 of them were felt,” Dalipa said.

Fog has blanketed the summit of the 2,597-meter volcano for the last two days, making it difficult to see ash or lava that might be erupting from its crater.

The volcano last spewed hot ash last April.

A seven-strong team from the directorate general of vulcanology and disaster mitigation have arrived in Padang from Bandung to monitor the volcano’s activities.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/18/authorities-raise-mt-talang-alert-level-highest.html


Talang is the 6th listed volcano from top left.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Notes:

IG reported that on 4 August seismicity from Reventador increased and periods of tremor frequently saturated the seismic stations. On 6 August, incandescent blocks were ejected from the crater. Thermal images revealed a linear area of higher temperatures, confirming the presence of a new lava flow on the S flank.

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Washington VAAC reported that on 14 August a 2-hour-long thermal anomaly detected over Pagan was followed by a small emission. The emission, hotter than its surroundings, drifted NW and quickly dissipated. [Source: GVP]

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [13 August 2009]

Posted by feww on August 14, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report:  5  – 11 August 2009

VoW: Kilauea

Kilauea
Since the vent collapse in late June, Kilauea’s summit plume had been wispy, translucent and low in SO2 content, resulting in improved air quality in Kona and Ka‘u. However, the summit vent has picked up in activity again this week. (Photo courtesy of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory). Source: Click Here.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Ongoing Activity:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [30 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 30, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 22 July – 28 July 2009

VOW: Batu Tara

batu tara July 27 2009
Batu Tara remained active in late July 2009. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this photo-like image the volcano releasing a faint plume on July 27, 2009. The distinct segments of the plume suggest that the volcano has released ash and/or steam in pulses. The plume blows toward the northwest over the Flores Sea.  NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

batutara EO 18 may 2009
Batu Tara remained active in mid-May 2009. On May 17, 2009, as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image, the tiny volcanic island released a plume of ash and/or steam. The volcano’s plume forms a counter-clockwise arc north of the volcano. East of that plume is another, fainter plume, almost certainly of the same origin, blowing westward over the Flores Sea. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Notes:

KVERT reported that during 17-18 and 20-24 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. According to news sources, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. late on 25 July. Increased seismicity, powerful ash bursts, and avalanches were also reported.

Based on information from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 July explosions from Sakura-jima produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE. On 23 July and 27 July pilots observed ash plumes. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

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