Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

CO2e

FEWW estimates that human activity emitted about 222 times more CO2 in 2008 than the total sum of  all carbon dioxide spewed from volcanic eruptions that year.

FEWW CO2e Links

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15 Responses to “CO2e”

  1. E.D. said

    CO2 levels hit record high in 2017 – IAEA
    Global energy demand grew by 2.1% in 2017, according to IEA preliminary estimates, more than twice the growth rate in 2016. Global energy demand in 2017 reached an estimated 14,050 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe), compared with 10,035 Mtoe in 2000.

    Carbon dioxide (CO2)
    Global energy-related CO2 emissions grew by 1.4% in 2017, reaching a historic high of 32.5 gigatonnes (Gt), a resumption of growth after three years of global emissions remaining flat. The increase in CO2 emissions, however, was not universal. While most major economies saw a rise, some others experienced declines, including the United States, United Kingdom, Mexico and Japan. The biggest decline came from the United States, mainly because of higher deployment of renewables.

    Global energy-related CO2 rose by 1.4% in 2017, an increase of 460 million tonnes (Mt), and reached a historic high of 32.5 gigatonnes (Gt). Last year’s growth came after three years of flat emissions and contrasts with the sharp reduction needed to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

    The increase in carbon emissions, equivalent to the emissions of 170 million additional cars, was the result of robust global economic growth of 3.7%, lower fossil-fuel prices and weaker energy efficiency efforts. These three factors contributed to pushing up global energy demand by 2.1% in 2017.

    Oil
    World oil demand rose by 1.6% (or 1.5 million barrels a day) in 2017, a rate that was more than twice the annual average seen over the last decade. An increasing share of sport utility vehicles and light trucks in major economies and demand from the petrochemicals sector bolstered this growth.

    Latest trends in oil
    Global oil demand rose by 1.5 million barrels a day (mb/d) in 2017, continuing a trend of strong growth since prices fell in 2014. The rate of growth of 1.6% was more than twice the average annual growth rate seen over the past decade.

    One of the main drivers of growth was the transport sector. Vehicle ownership levels increased in 2017, as did the share of Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) and other large vehicles. This was particularly visible in the United States, where the share of SUVs and light trucks increased from 47% in 2011 to around 60% of total sales in 2017, bringing up the share of these vehicles in the total passenger car fleet to almost half. It is also a factor in the European Union, where oil demand increased by 2%, the highest rate of growth since 2001.

    Natural gas
    Global natural gas demand grew by 3%, thanks in large part to abundant and relatively low-cost supplies. China alone accounted for almost 30% of global growth. In the past decade, half of global gas demand growth came from the power sector; last year, however, over 80% of the rise came from industry and buildings.

    Latest trends in natural gas
    Global natural gas demand grew by 3%, thanks in large part to abundant and relatively low-cost supplies. China alone accounted for almost 30% of global growth. In the past decade, half of global gas demand growth came from the power sector; last year, however, over 80% of the rise came from industry and buildings.

    Natural gas demand grew by 3% in 2017 thanks to abundant and relatively low-cost supplies, as well as fuel switching in key economies, significantly above the average growth of 1.5% of the last five years. China alone accounted for nearly 30% of global growth – with more than 30 bcm out of a total of nearly 120 bcm. This signals a structural shift in the Chinese economy away from energy-intensive industrial sectors as well as a move towards cleaner energy sources, with both trends benefiting natural gas.

    Coal
    Global coal demand rose about 1% in 2017, reversing the declining trend seen over the last two years. This growth was mainly due to demand in Asia, almost entirely driven by an increase in coal-fired electricity generation.

    Latest trends in coal
    Global coal demand rose about 1% in 2017, reversing the declining trend seen over the last two years. This growth was mainly due to demand in Asia, almost entirely driven by an increase in coal-fired electricity generation.

    Global coal demand rose in 2017 by 1% to 3 790 Mtoe after two years of decline, the main change in global energy demand trends last year.

    Coal demand decreased by 2.3% in 2015 and 2.1% in 2016, led by lower demand in the power sector in key markets such as China and the United States. The rebound in coal demand in 2017 was driven entirely by an increase in coal-fired electricity generation, which drove up coal demand for power by nearly 3.5% compared to the previous year, while declining global coal use in industry and buildings offset half of the growth in coal use in electricity generation.

    Renewables
    Renewables saw the highest growth rate of any energy source in 2017, meeting a quarter of global energy demand growth. China and the United States led this unprecedented growth, contributing around 50% of the increase in renewables-based electricity generation, followed by the European Union, India and Japan. Wind power accounted for 36% of the growth in renewables-based power output.

    Renewables saw the highest rate of growth of any energy source in 2017 and met around a quarter of global energy demand growth last year. The power sector played the most important role in the growth of low-carbon energy, with renewables-based electricity generation increasing by 6.3% (380 TWh) in 2017. Renewables now account for 25% of global electricity generation.

    Electricity
    World electricity demand increased by 3.1%, significantly higher than the overall increase in energy demand. Together, China and India accounted for 70% of this growth. Output from nuclear plants rose by 26 terrawatt hours (TWh) in 2017, as a significant amount of new nuclear capacity saw its first full year of operation.

    Latest trends in electricity

    World electricity demand increased by 3.1 %, significantly higher than the overall increase in energy demand. Together, China and India accounted for 70% of this growth. Output from nuclear plants rose by 26 TWh in 2017, as a significant amount of new nuclear capacity saw its first full year of operation.

    Electricity generation increased by 3.1%, or 780 TWh, worldwide in 2017 as electricity demand rose faster than overall global energy demand growth.

    Electricity demand growth in emerging economies remains strongly linked to rising economic output. In China, robust economic growth of nearly 7% and a warm summer drove electricity demand up by 6% (or 360 TWh). In India, demand growth of over 12% (or 180 TWh) outpaced the 7% growth in economic activity. Together, China and India accounted for 70% of global electricity demand growth worldwide, with another 10% coming from other emerging economies in Asia. India has made significant strides in improving access to electricity, with half a billion people having gained electricity since 2000 and a near-doubling of the access rate, to 82% of the population now, up from 43% in 2000.

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