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Posts Tagged ‘agricultural disaster areas’

Crop Disaster Areas Declared across 4 States

Posted by feww on November 21, 2013

22 Counties across four states declared crop disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 22  counties in four states as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by excessive rains and flooding that began May 5, 2013, and continues.

The disaster areas are

Vermont: Addison, Chittenden, Grand Isle, Rutland, Bennington, Essex, Orange, Caledonia, Franklin, Orleans, Windham, Washington, Windsor and Lamoille counties.

Massachusetts: Berkshire and Franklin counties.

New Hampshire: Cheshire, Coos, Grafton and  Sullivan counties.

New York:  Rensselaer and Washington counties.

Crop Disaster 2013

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,924 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 44 states, so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation
  • Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat
  • High Temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and November 20, 2013.

Recent Crop Disaster Designations

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Crop Disaster Declared in Five States

Posted by feww on November 14, 2013

High Winds, Hail, Excessive Rain and Flooding prompt USDA to declare crop disaster for44 counties in five states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 44 counties across five states as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by a combination of excessive rain, related flooding, high winds and hail in three separate declarations.

Designation # 1: Ten Counties in New Jersey have been declared  Crop Disaster Areas due to losses caused by excessive rain, related flooding, high winds and hail that occurred May 1 – September 24, 2013.

Those counties are Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, Monmouth, Ocean and  Salem.

Designation # 2: USDA has designated 20 counties in Michigan as Agricultural Disaster Areas due losses caused by hail that occurred June 10 – August 2, 2013

Those areas are Bay, Calhoun, Eaton, Genesee, Gratiot, Hillsdale, Huron, Ingham, Jackson, Lenawee, Livingston, Midland, Monroe, Oakland, Saginaw,  Sanilac, Shiawassee, Tuscola, Washtenaw, and  Wayne counties.

Designation # 3: USDA has designated fourteen counties in three states–Florida, Georgia and Alabama– as crop disaster areas due to losses caused by excessive rain that occurred May 1 – September 25, 2013.

  • Florida: Escambia, Madison, Santa Rosa, Taylor, Dixie, Jefferson, Okaloosa, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee counties.
  • Georgia: Brooks and Lowndes counties.
  • Alabama: Baldwin and Escambia counties.

All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Nov. 13, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Recent Crop Disaster Designations

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Crop Disaster Declared for 123 Counties in 10 States

Posted by feww on October 18, 2013

Excessive Rain, Freezing Temps and Extreme Heat Cause Agricultural Disaster in 10 States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated at least 123 additional counties as agricultural disaster areas across 10 states.

The crop disasters areas are in the states of Connecticut, Idaho, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Washington.

USDA issued a total of 6 separate disaster declarations on October 1, which were posted on their website on October 17, 2013 due to the government shutdown.

New York – First Disaster Designation due to damages caused by excessive rain and related flooding, high winds and hail that began May 1, 2013 and continues.

Disaster areas are Albany, Essex, Monroe, Otsego, Seneca, Broome, Franklin, Montgomery, Putnam, Sullivan, Cayuga, Fulton, Oneida, Rensselaer, Ulster, Chenango, Genesee, Ontario, Saratoga, Washington, Clinton, Greene, Orange, Schenectady, Wayne, Columbia, Herkimer, Orleans, Schoharie, Westchester, Cortland, Jefferson, Oswego, Schuyler, Wyoming, Dutchess, Madison, Allegany, Delaware, Livingston, St. Lawrence, Tompkins, Bronx, Erie, Niagara, Steuben, Warren, Cattaraugus, Hamilton, Onondaga, Tioga, Yates, Chemung, Lewis and Rockland counties.

Also included in the above designation

  • Connecticut: Fairfield and Litchfield counties.
  • Massachusetts: Berkshire County.
  • New Jersey: Passaic and Sussex counties.
  • Pennsylvania: Pike, Susquehanna and Wayne counties.
  • Vermont: Addison, Bennington, Chittenden, Grand Isle and
    Rutland counties.

New York – Second Disaster Designation due to damages and losses caused by freeze and frost that occurred March 13 – May 28, 2013.

Crop Disaster Areas: Cayuga, Columbia and Oswego, Albany, Greene, Madison, Rensselaer, Ulster, Cortland, Jefferson, Oneida, Seneca, Wayne, Dutchess, Lewis, Onondaga and Tompkins counties.

Also included in the above designation

  • Massachusetts: Berkshire County.

New York – Third Disaster Designation due to damages and losses caused by weather-related disease and fungi infestation that began June 19, 2013, and continues.

Disaster areas are Cayuga, Cortland, Oswego, Tompkins, Onondaga, Seneca and Wayne counties.

Oregon – Disaster Designation 1

USDA has designated three counties in Oregon as crop disaster areas due to damages caused by freezing temperatures that occurred April 8-30, 2013.  The counties are Baker, Umatilla and Union.

Also included in the above designation

  • Minnesota: Grant, Malheur, Morrow and Wallowa counties
  • Idaho: Adams and Washington counties.
  • Washington: Benton, Columbia and Walla Walla counties.

Oregon – Disaster Designation 2

USDA has designated nine counties in Oregon and Washington as crop disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by freezing temperatures and excessive rain that occurred March 22 – June 30, 2013.

  • Oregon: Wasco , Clackamas, Hood River, Marion, Wheeler, Gilliam, Jefferson and Sherman counties
  • Washington: Klickitat County

Oregon – Disaster Designation 3

USDA has designated nine counties in Oregon and Washington as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by freezing temperatures and extreme heat that occurred April 8 – May 13, 2013. Those counties are

  • Oregon: Gilliam, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Wasco and Wheeler counties.
  • Washington: Benton and Klickitat counties.

[All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Oct. 1, 2013.]

The latest designations raise the total [listed] crop disaster areas to at least 3,844 counties across 44 states so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation, Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Freezing Temperatures and Excessive Rain
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive Heat, High temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, Wet Weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease
  • Freezing Temperatures
  • Extreme Heat
  • Excessive Rain and Related Flooding
  • High Winds and Hail
  • Weather-related Disease and Fungi Infestation

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The counties listed above as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and September 25, 2013.

Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill.These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage.

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Crop Disaster Losses 2013

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

Disaster Declarations USDA: 3,721 County-level crop disasters in 38 states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared 3,721 county-level agricultural disaster areas across 38 states so far this year.

The crop disasters for year 2013 include losses and damages caused by

  • DROUGHT
  • FLOOD
  • Flash flooding
  • Excessive rain, moisture, humidity
  • Severe Storms, thunderstorms
  • Ground Saturation, Standing Water
  • Hail
  • Wind, High Winds
  • Fire, Wildfire
  • Heat, Excessive heat, High temp. (incl. low humidity)
  • Winter Storms, Ice Storms, Snow, Blizzard
  • Frost, FREEZE
  • Hurricanes, Typhoons, Tropical Storms
  • Tornadoes
  • Volcano
  • Mudslides, Debris Flows, Landslides
  • Heavy Surf
  • Ice Jams
  • Insects
  • Tidal Surges
  • Cold, wet weather
  • Cool/Cold, Below-normal Temperatures
  • Lightning
  • Disease

Notes:
1. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.

2. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

4. A number of counties have been designated crop disaster areas more than once due to multiple disasters.

5. The disaster designations were approved by USDA between January 9 and September 25, 2013.

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Disaster Declared for 204 Counties in 10 States

Posted by feww on September 27, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, disaster calendar, disaster diary, disaster watch, disaster watch 2013, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, global drought | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S. Drought Eases

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

Drought conditions improve slightly; near- to above-normal temps to persist nationwide

In the short term, temperatures are expected to rise  10 to 15 degrees above average from the Upper Great Lakes to part of the Middle Mississippi Valley; in contrast, temperatures will be 10 to 20 degrees below average from the Northern/Central High Plains to the Great Basin/Central Rockies, said NWS.

As of September 25, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states remained agricultural disaster areas due to the drought, said USDA.

us drought map 24sep13
US Drought Map as of September 24, released by US Drought Monitor on September 26, 2013.

The Midwest: “By September 22, topsoil moisture was still rated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at least half very short to short in Iowa (77%), Missouri (69%), Illinois (66%), South Dakota (62%), Nebraska (61%), and Wisconsin (55%).  On the same date, USDA rated at least half of the pastures in very poor to poor condition in Iowa (62%) and Wisconsin (58%).  And, more than one-quarter of the corn and soybeans were rated very poor to poor in Wisconsin (29 and 29%, respectively), Missouri (27 and 33%), and Iowa (27 and 29%).” U.S. Drought Monitor reported.

The Great Plains: “Despite all of the rain, rangeland and pastures across some parts of the Great Plains continued to suffer from the cumulative effects of multiple drought years.  On September 22, rangeland and pastures were rated at least one-third very poor to poor several states, including Texas (54%), Colorado (43%), Nebraska (40%), and Kansas (36%).”

The Lower Mississippi Valley:  “… topsoil moisture was still rated 41% very short to short in Arkansas and Louisiana, although those numbers represented a significant improvement from the previous week’s figures of 78 and 52%, respectively.”

The West: “No changes in the drought depiction were yet introduced in the Northwest, but the region will be monitored as precipitation continues to spread inland.”

Hawaii and Alaska: “From September 1-24, Hilo’s rainfall totaled just 2.17 inches (28% of normal).  Near the southern tip of the Big Island, very poor pasture conditions led to degradation from severe to extreme drought (D2 to D3). […] Fairbanks reported its first autumn freeze (29°F) on September 15, followed 3 days later by its first measurable snowfall (0.6 inch).  Meanwhile, heavy precipitation fell in non-drought areas of southeastern Alaska, where Ketchikan netted 12.22 inches of rain from September 15-23.”

Related Links

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Agricultural Disaster Declared for 204 Counties

Posted by feww on September 26, 2013

204 Counties across 10 states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 204 counties across 10 states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas,  Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding in two separate declarations.

First Disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 148 counties across six states—Georgia, Alabama, Florida, The Carolinas and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain that began April 1, 2013, and continuing.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rain

  • Georgia: Appling, Clinch, Grady, Macon, Treutlen, Turner, Twiggs, Union, Atkinson, Coffee, Greene, Madison, Walton, Ware, Washington, Wayne, Bacon, Colquitt, Gwinnett, Miller, Wheeler, Wilcox, Wilkinson, Baker, Cook, Hancock, Mitchell, Bibb, Dooly, Henry, Monroe, Baldwin, Crawford, Hart, Montgomery, Bulloch, Dougherty, Houston, Murray, Banks, Crisp, Irwin, Morgan, Butts, Early, Lee, Pickens, Barrow, Decatur, Jackson, Newton, Calhoun, Evans, Liberty, Pulaski, Ben Hill, De Kalb, Jasper, Oconee, Camden, Forsyth, Lincoln, Rabun, Berrien, Echols, Jeff Davis, Oglethorpe, Candler, Fulton, Long, Richmond, Bleckley, Effingham, Jefferson, Peach, Charlton, Glynn, Lumpkin, Schley, Brantley, Elbert, Jenkins, Pierce, Clayton, Gordon, McDuffie, Stephens, Brooks, Emanuel, Johnson, Putnam, Dawson, Habersham, McIntosh, Sumter, Bryan, Fannin, Jones, Rockdale, Dodge, Hall, Marion, Burke, Franklin, Lanier, Screven, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Toombs, Chatham, Gilmer, Laurens, Seminole, Upson, Warren, White, Wilkes, Clarke, Glascock, Lowndes, Taylor, Worth, Telfair, Thomas, Tift and Towns counties.
  • Alabama: Houston County.
  • Florida: Baker, Gadsden, Jackson, Leon, Columbia, Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee and Clay counties.
  • South Carolina: Abbeville, Anderson, Jasper, Aiken, Barnwell, McCormick, Allendale, Hampton and Oconee counties.
  • Tennessee: Polk County.

Second disaster Declaration

USDA has designated 56 counties across five states—Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky and Tennessee—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred July 15 – August 19, 2013.

List of Disaster Areas – Excessive Rainfall and Flooding

  • Missouri: Butler, Gasconade, New Madrid, Stoddard, Camden, Laclede, Osage, Texas, Cole, Maries, Pemiscot, Vernon, Dunklin, Miller, Pulaski, Webster, Barton, Cape Girardeau, Dent, Mississippi, St. Clair, Bates, Carter, Douglas, Moniteau, Scott, Benton, Cedar, Franklin, Montgomery, Shannon, Bollinger, Christian, Greene, Morgan, Warren, Boone, Crawford, Hickory, Phelps Callaway, Dallas, Howell, Ripley, Wright and Wayne counties.
  • Arkansas: Clay, Craighead, Greene and Mississippi counties.
  • Kansas: Bourbon, Crawford and Linn counties.
  • Kentucky: Fulton County.
  • Tennessee: Dyer and Lake counties.

All counties listed above were designated as agricultural disaster areas on September 25, 2013.

“Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage,” said USDA.

Notes:
1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.
2. USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop.
3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.

Related Links

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013 | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

U.S. Drought Map – September 17, 2013

Posted by feww on September 20, 2013

US Drought Conditions

About 64.09 percent of the land in the contiguous Unites States were covered by drought conditions D0 (Abnormally Dry) to D4 (Exceptional Drought) week ending September 17, 2013, up from 63.75 percent the previous week, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Drought conditions D1 – D4 improved marginally to 48.19 percent, down from 50.69 percent earlier.

us drought map 17sep13

Weather Summary [mirrored from U.S. Drought Monitor]:

The combination of ample Gulf and Pacific tropical moisture (in part from Tropical Storms Manuel (Pacific) and Ingrid (Gulf) which inundated Mexico), stalled frontal systems, and upsloping conditions produced widespread heavy to copious rainfall (widespread 2 to 6 inches, locally 12 to 18 inches especially near Boulder, CO) and severe flash flooding in parts of New Mexico and Colorado.

Moderate to heavy rains (1.5 to 4 inches) also drenched portions of Arizona, eastern Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, south-central Montana, western sections of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and northern and southern Texas. September monsoonal rains have generated welcome relief from the drought in the Southwest, central Rockies, and High Plains, but unfortunately have been accompanied by flash flooding.

US Drought Disaster Areas

As of September 18, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states have been designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.

us drought disaster map 18-09-2013
US Drought Disaster Map. At least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all the U.S. counties and county equivalents, across 29 states have been designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought since January 1, 2013. Image source: USDA

Related Links

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Agricultural Disaster Declared for 194 Counties in 13 States

Posted by feww on September 20, 2013

Drought and Deluge Prompt Disaster Declarations in Multiple Regions across U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 194 counties in 13 states across 5 regions as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused either by drought, or by one or more of hail, severe freezing, excessive snow, excessive rain and flooding.

  • As of September 18, 2013, at least 1,345 counties and parishes, or 42.8% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.
  • Since September 11, 2013 a total of 332 counties have been designated as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

[Notes: 1. The total number of counties designated as agricultural disaster areas includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas. 2. The USDA trigger point for a countywide disaster declaration is a 30 percent crop loss on at least one crop. 3. The U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]

Drought Disaster

USDA has designated a total of eight counties in Idaho and Montana as Agricultural Disaster Areas.

  • Idaho: Clearwater, Lewis, Idaho, Latah, Nez Perce and Shoshone counties.
  • Montana: Mineral and Missoula counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning January 1, 2013

USDA has designated 102 counties in five states—Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began January 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Alabama (64 Counties):  Autauga, Cleburne, Geneva, Macon, Baldwin, Coosa, Greene, Madison, Barbour, Covington, Hale, Marengo, Blount, Crenshaw, Henry, Mobile, Bullock, Cullman, Houston, Monroe, Calhoun, Dale, Jackson, Montgomery, Cherokee, Dallas, Jefferson, Morgan, Chilton, Elmore, Lamar, Perry, Choctaw, Etowah, Lauderdale, Pickens, Clarke, Fayette, Lowndes, Pike, Russell, St. Clair, Shelby, Sumter, Talladega, Tallapoosa, Tuscaloosa, Walker, Washington, Wilcox, Bibb, Coffee, Escambia, Marion, Butler, Colbert, Lawrence, Marshall, Chambers, Conecuh, Lee, Randolph, Clay, De Kalb, Limestone and Winston counties.
  • Florida (5 Counties):  Escambia, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa and Walton.
  • Georgia (13 Counties): Carroll, Clay, Floyd, Polk, Chattahoochee, Dade, Haralson, Quitman, Chattooga, Early , Muscogee, Seminole and Stewart.
  • Mississippi (11 Counties): Clarke, Jackson, Lowndes, Tishomingo, George, Kemper, Monroe, Wayne, Greene, Lauderdale and Noxubee.
  • Tennessee (7 Counties): Franklin, Hardin, Lincoln, Wayne, Giles, Lawrence and Marion counties.

Excessive Rain and Flooding Disasters Beginning May 1, 2013

USDA has designated 54 counties in three states—The Carolinas and Tennessee—as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that began May 1, 2013, and continues.

  • North Carolina (41 Counties): Avery, Cleveland, Henderson, Rutherford, Brunswick, Columbus, Madison, Transylvania, Buncombe, Durham, Orange, Watauga, Wilson, Alamance, Chatham, Jackson, New Hanover, Ashe, Edgecombe, Johnston, Pender, Bladen, Gaston, Lincoln, Burke, Granville, McDowell, Pitt, Caldwell, Greene, Mitchell, Polk, Caswell, Haywood, Nash, Person, Robeson, Wake, Wayne, Wilkes and Yancey counties.
  • South Carolina (8 Counties): Cherokee, Greenville, Oconee, Spartanburg, Dillon, Horry, Pickens and York counties.
  • Tennessee (5 Counties): Carter, Cocke, Greene, Johnson and Unicoi.

Disasters caused by combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013

USDA has designated 22 counties in Minnesota and Iowa as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to the combined effects of severe freezing and excessive snow followed by excessive rainfall and flooding that occurred January 1 – August 2, 2013.

  • Minnesota (18 Counties): Dodge, Koochiching, Mower, Steele, Freeborn, Lake of the Woods, Olmsted, Beltrami, Goodhue, Roseau, Waseca, Faribault, Itasca, St. Louis, Winona, Fillmore, Rice and Wabasha counties.
  • Iowa (4 Counties): Howard, Mitchell, Winnebago and Worth.

Hail Disaster on August 6, 2013

USDA has designated 8 counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by hail that occurred August 6, 2013.

  • Minnesota: Dakota, Goodhue, Ramsey, Scott, Hennepi, Rice and Washington counties.
  • Wisconsin: Pierce County.

Related Links

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U.S. Drought Expands by 2 Percent

Posted by feww on September 12, 2013

Lake Altus-Lugert drops to a historic low level of 12.6 percent of capacity: US Drought Monitor 

As of September 10, 2013  about 63.75 percent of land area in the contiguous U.S. was covered by D0-D4 drought conditions, up from 61.71 percent last week, while more than half of the country was in moderate drought condition or worse, with about a third experiencing severe, exceptional or extreme drought levels, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

us drought map 10sep13
US Drought Map as of September 10, released by US Drought Monitor on  September 12, 2013.

2013 Drought Disaster Areas

As of September 11, 2013 at least 1,338 counties and parishes, or 42.41% of all U.S. counties and county equivalents, were designated as agricultural disaster areas due to the ongoing drought.

[Note: The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster areas.]

Drought Summary — Selected Regions — September 10, 2013

[Source: Mirrored from U.S. Drought Monitor with some editing]

  • The Northeast: Continuing dry conditions prompted the introduction of abnormal dryness (D0) across central Maryland, southwestern Connecticut, and Long Island, N.Y., this week. According to AHPS, these areas have significant precipitation deficits at 180-, 90-, 60-, 30-, and 14 days. Streams and rivers are also running low, especially in central Maryland.
  • The Midwest: Most of the Midwest remained dry this past week… Positive temperature departures of 4-8 degrees F were common throughout the region, with +10 degree F anomalies over portions of Iowa and southern Minnesota … widespread 1-category downgrades were made to the drought depiction across northern and southwestern Missouri, southern, central and eastern Iowa, parts of northern Illinois, northeastern and central Indiana, and central and southern portions of both Minnesota and Wisconsin.
  • The Lower Mississippi Valley: Lack of rain during the past 7-days, temperatures 2-6 degrees above normal, and stream flow values in the lowest quartile of their historical distributions prompted 1-category degradations to the depiction across northern and western Louisiana, central and southern Arkansas, and northern and central Mississippi.
  • Central and Northern Great Plains: One-category downgrades were warranted across southeastern Nebraska … In Kansas, the area of abnormal dryness (D0) in the northeast was expanded, and D0 conditions were added to southeast parts of the state.
  • Southern Great Plains: Continuing dryness over north-central and northeastern Texas warranted a number of 1-category degradations. Texas, as dry weather has followed a reasonably wet summer in the region. In Oklahoma, 1-category downgrades were made across a significant portion of the state, with remaining drought-free areas in central and eastern Oklahoma deteriorating to abnormal dryness (D0). In Jackson County (southwest part of state)… Lake Altus-Lugert dropped to a historic low level of 12.6 percent of capacity.
  • The Northwest: … the short-term gains have not offset long-term precipitation deficits… no change… in this area.
  • Hawaii: A 1-categorydowngrade was warranted for western and southeastern sides of the Big Island of Hawaii…
    • On the west side, it was reported that livestock and ornamental producers were having to haul water to sustain operations, which is very expensive and significantly reduces profits.
    • On the southeast side of the Island, there were reports of crop stress.
  • Alaska: No changes were made in Alaska this week.

Related Links

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Agricultural Disasters Declared for 180 U.S. Counties

Posted by feww on August 29, 2013

Extreme weather events, severe climatic episodes cause agricultural disasters across 14 states

Drought and Deluge, hail and high winds, severe storms and excessive rains have prompted USDA to designate 180 counties across 14 states as agricultural disaster areas.

Drought

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 39 counties in 5 states as agricultural disaster areas due to damage and losses caused by the recent drought.

  • Texas: Cherokee, Rusk, Smith, Van Zandt, Wood, Anderson, Gregg, Houston, Panola, Angelina, Harrison, Hunt, Rains, Camp, Henderson, Kaufman, Shelby, Franklin, Hopkins, Nacogdoches and Upshur counties.
  • Colorado: Eagle, Garfield, Lake, Routt, Grand, Pitkin and Summit counties.
  • Oregon: Curry, Coos, Douglas and Josephine counties.
  • California: Del Norte County.
  • Idaho: Jerome, Cassia, Gooding, Lincoln, Minidoka and Twin Falls counties.

All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas Aug. 28, 2013. The lists include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

US agri disaster map - 28aug2013
Map of the U.S. Drought Disaster areas as of August 28, 2013. At least 1,336 counties, or 42.5% of all U.S. counties¹, were designated as agricultural disaster areas² due to the ongoing drought. [The figure includes both primary and contiguous disaster designations.] Source: USDA. Map enhanced by FIRE-EARTH.

1. [U.S. has a total of 3,143 counties and county-equivalents.]
2. Agriculture officials declare disaster when crop damage has exceeded 30 percent.

UPDATED: September 6, 2013 – MAP CORRECTED!

Hail, high winds and severe storm

USDA has designated seven counties in two states as agricultural disaster area due to damage and losses caused by hail, high winds and severe storms that occurred August 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Montana: Park, Carbon, Gallatin, Meagher, Stillwater and Sweet Grass counties.
  • Wyoming: Park County.

Excessive Rain and Flooding

USDA has designated 68 counties across six states as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that occurred March 1, 2013, and continues.

  • Tennessee: Bradley, Hamilton, Macon, Rhea, Greene, Knox, Smith, Unicoi, Cocke, Hardin, Marion, Sequatchie, Washington, Anderson, Clay, Hawkins, Decatur, Jefferson, Polk, Sevier, Monroe, Benton, Cumberland, Henderson, Putnam, Blount, Franklin, Loudon, Sumner, Chester, Hamblen, Meigs, Roane, Carroll, Grainger, McMinn, Trousdale, Union, Van Buren, Warren, Sullivan, Carter, Grundy, McNairy, Wayne, Wilson, Perry, Bledsoe, De Kalb and Jackson counties.
  • Alabama: Jackson and Lauderdale counties.
  • Georgia: Catoosa, Fannin, Walker, Dade, Murray and Whitfield counties.
  • Kentucky: Allen and Monroe counties.
  • Mississippi: Alcorn and Tishomingo counties.
  • North Carolina: Cherokee,  Madison,  Swain, Haywood, Mitchell and Yancey counties.

Agricultural Disaster Declared in ALL 46 South Carolina Counties due to Excessive Rain and Flooding

USDA has designated the entire state of South Carolina and 20 other counties across Georgia and North Carolina as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by excessive rain and flooding that occurred March 1, 2013, and continues.

  • South Carolina: ALL 46 counties. Aiken, Chesterfield, Greenville, Orangeburg, Berkeley, Dorchester, Lee, Sumter, Allendale, Clarendon, Hampton, Pickens, Calhoun, Edgefield, Marion, Union, Bamberg, Colleton, Horry, Richland, Charleston, Florence, Marlboro, Williamsburg, Barnwell, Darlington, Jasper, Saluda, Cherokee, Georgetown, Newberry, York, Beaufort, Dillon, Laurens, Spartanburg, Anderson, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, Abbeville, Chester, Greenwood, Lancaster, Oconee and McCormick counties.
  • Georgia: Burke, Columbia, Richmond, Chatham, Effingham and Screven counties.
  • North Carolina: Anson, Columbus, Mecklenburg, Robeson, Cleveland, Henderson, Richmond, Scotland, Brunswick, Gaston, Polk, Rutherford, Transylvania and Union counties.

Related Links

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Disaster Calendar – August 19, 2013

Posted by feww on August 19, 2013

Hundreds dead or missing as floods and mudslides devastate China

Extreme rain events, flooding and mudslides in northeast and southern China have left hundreds of people dead, injured or missing.

“The Heilongjiang Provincial Hydrological Bureau forecast the stretch of the Heilong River between Tongjiang and Fuyuan County will witness the largest flooding in its history. Authorities in Tongjiang have started a Grade I response preparing for floods,” said a report.

  • The deluge has destroyed or damaged at least 210,000 houses in Jilin, Heilongjiang, Guangdong and Liaoning provinces, with the direct economic losses estimated at 18.5 billion yuan (3 billion U.S. dollars), said a report.
  • Torrential rains and floods triggered by Typhoon Utor have affected 680,000 people in eight cities in Guangxi. Some 16,660 hectares of crops have been damaged and 1,080 houses have been destroyed.
  • In Guangdong Province, TY UTOR has affected more than 2.5 million people destroying or damaging about 19,000 houses and forcing 513,000 people to relocate. The extreme rain has also ruined 173,333 hectares of farmland, according to local authorities.
  • “In central China’s Hunan Province, landslides triggered by continuous rainfalls over the past two days have left one dead and 14 others buried or missing,” said a report.

[NOTE: Some of the stats quoted above are already outdated as the  catastrophe continues to unfold in China on an almost hourly basis.]

flooding in China -18aug
Original caption: People walk on ruins after the flood in Nankouqian Township, Fushun, northeast China’s Liaoning Province, Aug. 18, 2013. The death toll has risen to 54 as of Monday morning after the worst flooding in decades ravaged Fushun City, northeast China’s Liaoning Province, said the local authorities on Aug. 19, 2013. Extreme rainstorms battered Liaoning from Thursday to Saturday, leaving many rivers flooded in Fushun. (Xinhua/Pan Yulong)

  • In Fushun City, 139,800 houses were damaged and many have collapsed.
  • In Guangdong province, 19,000 houses have collapsed or sustained severe damage, forcing  about 513,000 residents to relocate.  The direct economic loss is estimated at 490 million yuan (80 million U.S. dollars).
  • “Heilongjiang Province reported [37]  flood-related deaths. The floods have destroyed over 2,500 houses and severely damaged at least 12,500 others, with direct economic losses estimated at 7.13 billion yuan (1.15 billion U.S. dollars).”
  • In Jilin Province, at least “35,000 houses were destroyed or damaged with direct economic losses at 2.4 billion yuan (387 million U.S. dollars).”
  • “As of 10 a.m. Monday, a total of 1.8 million people in 30 counties in Liaoning Province have been affected and 162,000 have been evacuated from flooded areas. More than 6,100 buildings have collapsed and the total direct economic loss is around 8.5 billion yuan(1.39 billion U.S. dollars), according to the ministry.”

Don’t bring your car to China!

severe floodin in Guangdong
Heping Town in Shantou City, south China’s Guangdong Province devastated by extreme rain events and severe flooding, August19, 2013.  (Xinhua/Yao Jun). More images…

-oOo-

Philippines’ Cebu declares calamity as sunken ferry leaks oil

The central Philippine province of Cebu has declared a state of calamity as an oil slick from a ferry that sank last week spread to about 20 percent of the coast, said a report.

-oOo-

16 Counties across three states declared agricultural disaster areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 16 counties in three states as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by frost and freezing temperatures that occurred March 25-29, 2013.

The disaster designations are

  • Alabama: Baldwin, Escambia, Mobile, Washington, Choctaw, Clarke, Conecuh, Covington and Monroe counties.
  • Florida: Escambia, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties.
  • Mississippi: George, Greene, Jackson and Wayne counties.

-oOo-

Beaver Creek Fire Consumes 100,000 acres

As of August 18, 2013 10pm,  the Beaver Creek Fire had grown to at about 100,921 acres with 8% containment.

Laura Shulz Zone 1 - e
Beaver Creek Fire. Red Flag conditions, including higher temperatures and wind gusts to 38 miles per hour, increased fire activity on the Beaver Creek Fire. Credit: Sawtooth National Forest/ USFS.

For additional information see

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Drought Disaster Spreads across Four States

Posted by feww on June 27, 2013

USDA declares drought disaster in 19 additional counties in four states

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated a total of 19 counties in four states—Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and California—as agricultural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by the ongoing drought.

The latest designations, issued on June 26, include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

  • Colorado: Archuleta, Mineral, Conejos, Hinsdale, La Plata,
    Rio Grande and Saguache counties.
  • New Mexico: Rio Arriba and San Juan counties.
  • California: San Diego, Imperial, Orange and Riverside counties.
  • Texas: Reeves, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Loving, Pecos and Ward counties.

us drought disaster map  26jun2013
U.S. Drought Disaster Map as of June 26, 2013. A total of at least 1,267 counties across 28 states are currently designated as [primary or contiguous] drought disaster areas.

 

Related Links

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Drought Disaster Declared for 31 Counties across Seven States

Posted by feww on June 13, 2013

U.S. Drought Disaster Spreads

USDA has designated 31 additional counties across seven states as Agricultural Disaster Areas due to damages and losses caused by several ongoing drought. The designations include both primary and contiguous disaster areas.

A total of at least 1,266 counties across 28 states are currently designated as [primary or contiguous] drought disaster areas.

The latest disaster designations are  in the following states

  • Texas
  • Colorado
  • Arizona
  • Utah
  • New Mexico
  • Oregon
  • Nevada

us drought disaster map
U.S. Drought Disaster Map as of June 12, 2013. A total of at least 1,266 counties across 28 states are currently designated as [primary or contiguous] drought disaster areas.

Related Links

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Disaster Declared in More Counties Across 11 States

Posted by feww on July 13, 2012

Severe frost and freeze in April, ongoing drought prompt agricultural disaster declarations across 11 states

Losses and damage caused to crops due to severe frost and freeze in April, as well as the ongoing drought across  most of the U.S. have prompted USDA to declare agricultural disaster areas in dozens of U.S. counties across 11 states.

  • Damage and losses caused by drought that began in April 2012 and continues prompted USDA to issue disaster declaration in
    • Arkansas:  30 counties
    • Missouri: 6 counties
  • Georgia. USDA has designated a total of 30 counties in Georgia as both primary and contiguous natural disaster areas in two separate declaration due to frost, freeze, hail and high winds that occurred in April and May 2012.
    • Six counties in North Carolina (4), South Carolina (1) and Tennessee (1), are also designated as disaster areas because they are contiguous.
  • Iowa. USDA has designated 43 counties in Iowa as both primary and contiguous natural disaster areas due to damages and losses caused by severe frosts and freezes that occurred April 6-30, 2012.
    • Nine counties in Illinois (4), Missouri (1), Nebraska (2) and Wisconsin (2) are also designated as disaster areas because they are contiguous.


Map of U.S. Hazards Outlook for July 20 – 26, 2012, showing persistent severe drought.

Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

  • Japan: Extreme Rain Events.  Dozens are dead or missing on Kyushu island in western Japan, after extreme rain events, which began late Wednesday, spawned severe flooding and multiple landslides.
    •  A record 500 mm of rain fell over a 24-hour period on Aso, Kumamoto prefecture, while scores of homes in neighboring Minami-Aso were destroyed and many more damaged by landslides.
    • In Kyushu’s Kumamoto and neighboring Oita prefectures, hourly rainfalls of 106mm were recorded, Japan’s meteorological agency said, while warning of additional rainfall.
    • Up to 150,000 people in about 35,000 households were under mandatory evacuation orders.
  • Moscow, Russia. Freak storm pounded Moscow, flooding the the historic center of the Russian capital on Friday, said a report.
    • At least two people were killed after lightning struck them.
    • Further storms could strike throughout the weekend, meteorologist warned.


Black clouds spawned deadly lightning and massive rainstorm over Moscow.  Image by twitter user @OksanaGon4arov, via RT.

Links to Recent Related Entries

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Drought Disaster Declared in 26 States

Posted by feww on July 12, 2012

Half of the U.S. declared agricultural disaster area due to worsening drought

Drought conditions have sparked disaster declarations in more than 1,300 counties (1,016 primary, 278 contiguous) across the country, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported.

U.S. drought has been intensified by the driest June in history and triple-digit temperatures on 10 out of 11 days recently.

  • As of last week, Moderate to Extreme drought conditions prevailed in 52.56 percent of the Midwest, and 68.39 percent of the South. Moderate to Exceptional drought conditions covered 73.87% of High Plains, 64.15% of the West and 35.46% of the Southeast.
  • The declaration covers 26 states across the country: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wyoming and Hawaii.

Map of U.S. counties declared as agricultural disaster areas.

In addition to the 1,016 primary disaster areas, 278 other counties have been designated as contiguous disaster areas (see map above).

[NOTE: There are 3,033 organized county or county-equivalent governments in the U.S. Source:   U.S. Department of Commerce –Census Bureau]

U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook (July 5 to September 30, 2012)

Corn Conditions

Thirty percent of the corn in the 18 states that produce most of the U.S. crop is now  in poor or very poor condition, up from 22% last week, USDA reported.

  • The amount of corn considered to be in excellent or good condition has dropped to 40 percent this week down from 48 percent last week.
  • Sixty percent or more of the crop has been rated poor to very poor in Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee.


Corn Condition – Selected States: Week Ending July 8, 2012. The 18 states planted 92% of 2011 acreage. Source: Crop Progress – Released July 9, 2012, by NASS/USDA.

For details of corn and soybean condition see Third of U.S. Corn in Poor or V. Poor Condition Posted on July 11, 2012

  • Kansas. A list of 82 Kansas counties that will be declared disaster areas is posted HERE.

Links to Recent Related Entries


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Disaster Declared in 94 Counties across 4 States

Posted by feww on July 3, 2012

Extreme Weather Events Cause Agricultural Disasters in  Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin

Damage and losses caused by the combined effects of blizzards, excessive snow, excessive heat, excessive rain, high winds, hail, freeze, frost, tornadoes, flooding and lightening that occurred between January 1 and May 11, 2012 prompted USDA to declare disaster in 94 counties across 4 states.

List of the 72 Michigan counties declared Primary Disaster Areas

List of 10 Michigan counties declared Contiguous Disaster Areas

The following 12 counties in Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin have also been designated as disaster areas because they are contiguous.

  • Indiana: Elkhart, Lagrange, La Porte, St. Joseph and Steuben counties.
  • Ohio: Fulton, Lucas and Williams counties.
  • Wisconsin: Florence, Forest, Marinette and Vilas counties.

March Heat, April Freezes

According to a report by the Central Region Climate Response Team, March Heat, April Freezes, March 2012 “was the warmest March on record for 25 states east of the Rockies, and for 15 other states this March ranked among the ten warmest.”

“During the middle of March maximum temperatures were averaging 40 degrees F above normal. Maximum temperatures regularly reached the low and mid 80s
well north into Wisconsin. Many locations broke daily records by more than 20 degrees F.”

However, April 2012 experienced “at least three significant cold air masses” that crept into the Midwest and caused freezing temperatures.

  • Iowa. The freeze caused a 50% destruction of the grape crop, about 90% damage to the apple and fruit tree blossoms and caused significant damage to corn and other crops.
  • Illinois. The 2012 apple crop in parts of the state was a total loss due to freeze on April 11.
    • “Sweet corn grower in Vermilion County planted sweet corn on March 19. Plants were up a couple of leaves when back‐to‐back freezes hit (26F and 27F), reducing stand by 5,000 plants per acre.
    • “Sleepy Creek Vineyard in Vermilion County reported earliest budding grapevines had 100 percent damage, and others had 80 percent damage.”
  • Michigan. “Thousands of acres of this year’s grape crop have been lost across southwest lower Michigan.
    • “A surveyor for National Grape Cooperative, better known as Welch’s Foods, said he went through hundreds of acres before even finding a live bud.  John Jasper estimates more than 10,000 acres were destroyed April 12, mostly in Berrien, Cass and Van Buren counties.
    • “Many apple, peach, cherry and blueberry orchards have also had substantial losses across northern Indiana and southern Lower Michigan.”
  • Wisconsin.  “Cherry growers in Door County, WI, anticipate losses of 70% …”
  • Kentucky.  Frost damaged apples, peaches, pears, plums, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, and grapes to varying degrees across the state.
    • “Wheat harvest began two weeks early in Kentucky due to warm weather, but warm temperatures, and then a brief cold snap, have wreaked havoc on the crop’s yield, which some farmers say has been cut nearly in half. Some farmers are getting 12 bu/acre, compared to a normal of 80 bu/acre,” said the report (PDF file).

Other Global Disasters, Significant Events

Up-to-date weekly average CO2 at Mauna Loa

  • Week of June 24, 2012:     395.33 ppm
  • Weekly value from 1 year ago:     393.50 ppm
  • Weekly value from 10 years ago:     375.08 ppm

Recent Mauna Loa CO2

  • May 2012:     396.78 ppm
  • May 2011:     394.16 ppm
  • May 2002:    375.65 ppm
  • May 1962:     321.01 ppm
  • [1-year increase: 2.62 ppm; 10-year increase: 21.13 ppm; 50-year increase: 75.77 ppm]

Recent Global CO2

  • April 2012:     394.01 ppm (1-year increase: 2.18 ppm)
  • April 2011:     391.83 ppm

New Zealand Earthquake

  • A Richter magnitude 7.0 quake struck the Cook Strait, west coast of North Island, NZ, about 100km SSW of New Plymouth and 170 km north-west of Wellington (40.00°S, 173.75°E), at a depth of about 230km on Tuesday, July 3 2012 at 10:36UTC.
    • NO tsunami warning was issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center.
    • NO report of casualties, as of posting.
    • The quake shook Wellington and was felt as far away as the Bay of Plenty and Christchurch, reports said.

U.S. Heat Wave


US Weather Hazards Map, July 3, 2012. “The heat wave continues for a large portion of the central and eastern U.S., with high temperatures this afternoon forecast to be 10-15 degrees above normal. Combined with high levels of humidity, this will create dangerous heat index values as high as 100-110 degrees for locations such as Minneapolis, Chicago, Kansas City and St. Louis,” said NWS.

The core of the record heat in the central United States is forecast to move gradually to the east this week, however heat alerts and heat indices to 105 degrees will continue. “Much of the eastern half of the country will continue to bake under clear skies, high temperatures and a lack of significant rain,” said NOAA forecasters.

Continued relentless heat through most of the week from the Plains to the Atlantic Coast will dominate the weather events.

Current Warnings Prompted by Unrelenting Heat

Red Flag Warnings, Excessive Heat Warnings and Heat Advisories issued in parts of 26 states from Wyoming to North Carolina.

Heat Advisories

Heat Advisories are in effect until this evening for parts of the Northern Plains, Ohio Valley and the Southeast:

  • North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida.

Record Daily High Temperatures Nationwide – June 2012

All Time Record High Temperatures Nationwide – June 2012

Mid-Atlantic Derecho

  • Death toll has climbed to 22 after the weekend derecho that ravaged the Mid-Atlantic region, with at least 2 million utility customers, or an estimated 7 million people, experiencing power outages amid the continued heat.

Drought Emergency

  • Nebraska.  Gov. Heineman has declared a state emergency due to the drought conditions throughout the state of Nebraska.
    • “This declaration is important for continued efforts of state officials to ensure the safety of Nebraskans,” Heineman said. “This action is necessary as dry conditions are presenting an imminent threat to the ability of local governments to respond to drought conditions. Additionally, actions such as haying along the roadsides in Nebraska help with drought conditions.”
    • Nebraska has broken or tied scores of record high temperatures in recent days.
    • Extreme temperatures will continue over central and western Nebraska through at least Friday due to high pressure lingering over the Central Plains, NWS reported.
    • “As excessive heat and dry conditions continue, fire danger is high again today. In addition, isolated thunderstorms are possible this afternoon and evening in north central Nebraska and in the Panhandle. The very dry conditions will continue to make the use of fireworks and even power equipment hazardous.”

Map of U.S. Precipitation (7-day total)

Map of U.S. Precipitation as Percent of Normal (7-day total)

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

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Drought Disaster Declared in Arizona, Utah

Posted by feww on April 6, 2012

Disaster Calendar 2012 – April 6

Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,440 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

Arizona and Utah counties declared agricultural disaster areas due to drought

USDA has designated 13 counties in Arizona and two counties in Utah as agricultural disaster areas.

  • Arizona, USA.  Disaster has been declared in 13 counties in Arizona and two counties in Utah due to losses caused by an ongoing drought that occurred Jan. 1 – Dec. 31, 2011.
    • Primary disaster areas:  Coconino, Gila, Maricopa, Pima, Pinal and Yavapai counties.
    • Contiguous disaster areas: Cochise, Graham, La Paz, Mohave, Navajo, Santa Cruz and Yuma counties.


Arizona Drought Map – Released April 5, 2012.

  • Utah, USA.The following counties in the bordering state of Utah have also been declared disaster areas because they are contiguous:
    • Kane and San Juan counties.

See also

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

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Santa Ana winds destroy or damage hundreds of buildings

Posted by feww on December 2, 2011

L.A. County declares state of emergency due to destructive Santa Ana windstorm

Los Angeles County declared a state of emergency due to the destructive Santa Ana winds, following emergency declarations by Pasadena, Sierra Madre, Monrovia, Temple City, San Marino and Glendora.

Disaster Calendar 2011 – December 2

[December 2, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,566 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles County has declared a state of emergency due to the destructive Santa Ana windstorm.
    • The declaration came after Pasadena, Sierra Madre, Monrovia, Temple City, San Marino and Glendora declared their own emergencies, a report said.
    • In Pasadena, dozens of buildings have been destroyed (red-tagged by fire department) and many more damaged (yellow-tagged), while others await damage assessment.
    • Thousands of trees, some century-old, and utility poles were uprooted or damaged.
    • Winds of more than 80 mph (130kph, the equivalent of a category one hurricane on FEWW New Hurricane Scale) have knocked out electricity to about half a million homes throughout SoCal, also causing road delays and forcing dozens of flights to LAX to be diverted.
    • Hundreds of people have sought shelter in Pasadena.
    • “An American Red Cross shelter at Robinson Park in Pasadena housed about 60 displaced people bused in early Thursday from an apartment building that flooded after a tree toppled by the high winds crashed through the roof, breaking a water main,” said a report.


Sawyer Nelson, 8, checks out an uprooted tree in Sierra Madre. Credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

  • California, USA. Six California counties (combined population ~ 3.7 million) have been declared  agricultural disaster areas because of losses caused by the combined effects of unseasonably cool spring weather, a freeze, hail, below normal summer temperatures and unseasonable rainfall that occurred from April 7 to Sept. 30, 2011, USDA reported.
    • Solano County was designated as primary disaster area.
    • Contra Costa, Napa, Sacramento, Sonoma and Yolo counties were declared disaster areas because they’re contiguous.
    • Soon we’d be blaming the ‘unseasonable weather,’ ‘abnormal temperatures’ and ‘unreasonable rainfall’

Related Links

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Four Disaster Declarations Issued for New York

Posted by feww on November 22, 2011

New York counties designated multiple Agricultural Disaster Areas

USDA has issued four separate disaster declarations for the state of New York because of the crop damage caused by drought and excessive heat, excessive heat and rain, excessive rain, flooding, flash flooding, hail, high winds, below normal temperatures and tornadoes, hurricanes (Irene) and severe storms (TS Lee).

Disaster Calendar 2011 – November 22

[November 22, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,576 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • New York, USA. Disaster Declaration No 1: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 35 counties in New York as agricultural disaster areas due to the damage caused by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee that occurred Aug. 27 – Sept. 15, 2011.


List of 20 NY counties designated as Primary Disaster Areas. Source: USDA


List of 15 NY counties designated as Contiguous Disaster Areas. Source: USDA

The following counties in the bordering states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Vermont were also added to the disaster declaration because they are contiguous.

  • Connecticut: Fairfield and Litchfield counties.
  • Massachusetts: Berkshire County.
  • Pennsylvania: Pike, Susquehanna and Wayne counties.
  • Vermont: Addison, Bennington, Chittenden, Grand Isle and Rutland counties.
  • New York, USA. Disaster Declaration No 2: USDA has designated 34 counties in New York as agricultural disaster areas due to the combined effects of excessive rain, flooding, flash flooding, hail, high winds, below normal temperatures and tornadoes that occurred April 1 – Aug. 30, 2011.


List of 10 NY counties designated as Primary Disaster Areas. Source: USDA


List of 24 NY counties designated as Contiguous Disaster Areas. Source: USDA

The following counties in the bordering states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania were also declared disaster areas because they’re contiguous.

  • New Jersey: Bergen, Passaic and Sussex counties.
  • Pennsylvania: Pike County.
  • New York, USA. Disaster Declaration No 3:  Six New York counties have been designated as a Agricultural Natural Disaster Areas by USDA due to excessive heat and rain that occurred July 10 – Aug. 25, 2011.
    • PDA Disaster areas: Orange County.
    • Contiguous Disaster areas:  Dutchess, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan and Ulster counties.

The following counties in the bordering states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania were also declared as disaster areas because they are contiguous.

  • New Jersey: Passaic and Sussex counties.
  • Pennsylvania: Pike County.
  • New York, USA. Disaster Declaration No 4: USDA has declared 12  counties in New York as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by drought and excessive heat that occurred July 1 – Aug. 31, 2011.
    • Six counties designated as primary disaster areas are Ontario, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben,Wayne and Yates.
    • The other six counties declared as contiguous disaster areas are Allegany, Cayuga, Chemung, Livingston, Monroe and Tompkins.

The following counties in the bordering state of Pennsylvania were also added to the disaster declaration because they are contiguous.

  • Pennsylvania: Potter and Tioga counties.

Other Disasters

  • Minnesota, USA. USDA has designated 15 counties in Minnesota as Agricultural Natural Disaster Areas due to losses caused by the combined effects of excessive rain, excessive heat, high winds, tornadoes and an early fall frost that occurred April 1 – Sept. 15, 2011.
    • The counties designated as Primary Disaster areas are Kandiyohi, Lincoln and McLeod.
    • Minnesota counties designated as Contiguous Disaster areas are Carver, Chippewa, Lyon, Meeker, Pipestone, Pope, Renville, Sibley, Stearns, Swift, Wright, Yellow and Medi.

The following counties in South Dakota were also declared natural disaster areas because they are contiguous.

  • South Dakota: Brookings, Deuel and Moody counties.

Monster Storm Emergency Declared

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Wildfire Attacks Reno

Posted by feww on November 19, 2011

Reno Fire Declared a Major Disaster by FEMA

A fast-moving 2,000-acre blaze whipped by 100 kph (60 mph) destroys at least 20 Reno homes, forces 10,000 people to evacuate and prompts Nevada Gov to declare a state of emergency in the state’s largest city (pop: 700,000 metro area)

Disaster Calendar 2011 – November 19

[November 19, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,579 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • Nevada, USA. A fast-moving massive blaze has destroyed at least 20 Reno homes, forcing 10,000 people to evacuate.
    • At least one person was reported dead as a result of a heart attack, and dozens were injured, mostly from smoke inhalation, respiratory or cardiac conditions.
    • “‘The whole mountain was on fire,’ said a Mountain Springs Road resident who escaped with his wife first to a shopping center and later to Reno High School after waking to the smell of intense smoke about 1:30 a.m.” AP reported.
    • The authorities ordered 90 schools to close.

Fire Report Summary by InciWeb:

The Caughlin fire is currently burning near homes on the southwest side of Reno, NV. The fire is scattered throughout a 2,000 acre area burning in a south to southwesterly direction.

Evacuation areas are from southwest of McCarran and S. Virginia Street and the entire area between Skyline Blvd, S. McCarran and Plumas.

Other Global Disasters

  • Virginia, USA. The Disaster President has declared a major disaster exists in the Commonwealth of Virginia because of the damage caused by the Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee during the period of September 8-9, 2011
    • The worst affected counties are Caroline, Essex, Fairfax, King and Queen, King George, Prince William, and Westmoreland and the independent City of Alexandria.
  • Connecticut, USA. The Disaster President has declared a major disaster exists in the State of Connecticut  in the area affected by the deadly pre-Halloween storm during the period of October 29-30, 2011.
    • The worst affected areas are in Fairfield, Hartford, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, Tolland, and Windham Counties. Also affected were tribal lands of the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan Tribal Nations.
  • Southeast Asia. At least 20 million people in SEA have been affected by flooding since June 2011. The worst affected countries are Thailand, Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam.
    • See Disaster Calendar 2011 and earlier blog entries for specific details of flooding damage in each country.
  • Massachusetts, USA.  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 7 counties in Massachusetts as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by excessive rain and high winds associated with Tropical Storm Irene that occurred Aug. 28-31, 2011.
    • The counties declared as Primary disaster areas are Barnstable, Dukes, Nantucket and Plymouth.
    • The counties declared as Contiguous disaster areas are Bristol, Norfolk and Suffolk.
  • Maryland, USA. USDA has designated 22 counties in Maryland as agricultural disaster areas due to losses caused by the combined effects of drought, excessive heat and damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee that occurred April 1 – Oct. 31, 2011.


List of Maryland counties designated as Primary Disaster Areas. Source: USDA


List of Maryland counties designated as Contiguous Disaster Areas. Source: USDA

  • The District of Columbia and following counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia were also added to the disaster declaration because the areas are contiguous.
    • Delaware: Kent, New Castle and Sussex counties.
    • District of Columbia.
    • Pennsylvania: Adams, Chester, Franklin, Fulton and Lancaster counties.
    • Virginia: Accomack, Arlington, Fairfax and Loudoun counties.
    • West Virginia: Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties.

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North Dakota Declared Disaster Area

Posted by feww on October 27, 2011

Extreme weather, insects and diseases render North Dakota a disaster area

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 52 out of  53 counties in North Dakota as natural disaster areas because of extreme weather, insects and diseases that have plagued the state this year.

Disaster Calendar 2011 – October 27

[October 27, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,602 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • North Dakota. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 52 counties in North Dakota as disaster areas due to losses caused by the combined effects of spring snowstorms, frosts and freezes in late spring and early fall, excessive rain, flooding, ground saturation, landslides, high winds, hail, tornadoes, periods of unseasonably cool spring temperatures, excessive summer heat and weather-related insects and diseases that occurred from Jan. 1, 2011, and continues.


List of 42 counties that are designated as primary disaster areas.  Source: USDA

    • The 10 North Dakota counties designated as contiguous disaster areas are Adams, Burleigh, Emmons, Kidder, Logan, Morton, Sheridan, Sioux, Slope and Stark counties.
  • Minnesota, Montana and South Dakota. The following 17 bordering counties in the states of Minnesota, Montana and South Dakota have also been designated as disaster areas:


Source: USDA

Other Global Disasters

  • Mexico, Central America and Colombia. More than two weeks of torrential rains, triggering widespread flooding and mudslides and swamping up to 1,000 towns and cities in the region, have displaced or severely affected over a million people, destroying  their food stocks in southern Mexico and Central America.
    • “In the Mexican state of Tabasco alone, over 250,000 people have been displaced by the floods and are demanding government aid,” a report said.
    • Floodwaters have inundated tns of thousands of farms, destroying or damaging hundreds of thousands of hectares of crops in the region.
    • “Drought, freezing temperatures, and floods have contributed to the loss of some 400,000 heads of cattle,” the report said.
    • The region has also experienced  severe losses in the production of corn, beans and sorghum.
  • Colombia. Torrential rains have again hit Colombia, killing at least 35 and severely affecting more than 100,000 people.
    • The country hasn’t even remotely recovered from last year’s epic floods, which have contributed to devastating mudslides that have destroyed much of Colombia’s infrastructure over  large areas.
    • Famine. Food shortages are forcing up prices, and leaving  thousands threatened with famine, the report said.
    • “The price of tortillas, a staple in the Mexican diet, is expected to be 30 percent higher at the end of this year relative to 2010. The expectation for the rise in the price of corn is higher, 56 percent in comparison with last year. The price of beans is already 70 percent higher, and that of vegetable shortening 100 percent, sugar 40 percent, milk 50 percent, rice 130 percent, and bread 60 percent.”
  • El Salvador. The Mega Deluge has destroyed more than 40 percent of the corn crop and 75 percent of the bean crop according to preliminary reports.
  • Guatemala. At least 40,000 peasant farmers whose entire crops have been wiped out are now facing famine.
  • Nicaragua. Mega floods have affected up to 150,000 people, displacing at least 10,000 villagers.

Many of the nearly 1,000 towns and cities that have been inundated across the vast geographical area, which  extends from Mexico to Colombia, would be unable to recover from the ongoing disasters and face certain collapse.

In fact, collapse is already occurring:

  • Famine is already present in some parts of Mexico, the Torreón Catholic Diocese has reported.
    • “Every day hundreds of displaced farmers and their families flock to this city in Coahuila state to ask for food that they can no longer afford to buy. And it is not just food: the cost of potable water is also on the rise, forcing families to turn to sources of drinking water that are contaminated by parasites and pollutants.”
  • Minnesota, USA. Thirty-four counties in the state of Minnesota  have been designated as natural disaster areas due to the combine effects of excessive rain, excessive heat, high winds, tornadoes and an early fall frost that occurred during the period of April 1, 2011, through Sept. 15, 2001, USDA reported.


List of the 11 Minnesota counties designated as primary disaster areas.  Source: USDA


List of the Minnesota counties designated as disaster areas because they are contiguous.  Source: USDA

  • North and South Dakota. The following counties in North and South Dakota have also been declared as disaster areas because they are contiguous:
    • North Dakota: Richland County.
    • South Dakota: Deuel, Grant and Roberts counties.
  • Turkey. The powerful quake that struck eastern Turkey together with large swarms of aftershocks have now claimed at least 525 lives, injured 1,650 people and made thousands homeless, officials said.
    • Hundreds are still missing under the rubble.
    • Survivors are buffeted by freezing rain and snow in worsening conditions.
    • There are severe shortages of tents and aid supplies, reports said.
    • A major earthquake could yet strike Turkey in 2011/2012 with a certainty of 0.7 (P= 66%).

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73 Illinois Counties Declared Disaster Areas

Posted by feww on September 23, 2011

Illinois suffered major crop losses from severe flooding in the first half of 2011

The fourth-wettest January to June period on record destroyed about half a million acres of crops.

READ THIS FIRST

Continued hacking and content censorship

In view of the continued hacking and censorship of this blog by the Internet Mafia, the Moderators have decided to maintain only a minimum presence at this site, until further notice.

FIRE-EARTH will continue to update the 2011 Disaster Calendar for the benefit of its readers.

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The Blog Moderators Condemn in the Strongest Possible Terms the Continued Removal of Content and Hacking of FIRE-EARTH and Affiliated Blogs by WordPress!

United States of Censorship

Even Twitter Counters are disabled when Blog posts criticize Obama, or contain “forbidden phrases.”  See also: Google’s Top 10 List of ‘Holy Cows’

Disaster Calendar 2011 – September 23

[September 23, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,636 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • Illinois, USA. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has designated 46 counties in Illinois as natural disaster areas (27 other counties are contiguous) due to losses caused by excessive rain, flooding and flash flooding that occurred April 1 to July 31, 2011.
    • The 46  counties declared primary disaster areas are: Alexander, Brown, Calhoun, Carroll, Cass, Clay, Crawford, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Franklin, Gallatin, Greene, Hamilton, Hardin, Henry, Jackson, Jefferson, Jersey, Jo Daviess, Johnson, Knox, Lawrence, Lee, Madison, Marion, McDonough, Mercer, Monroe, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Randolph, Richland, Rock Island, Saline, Schuyler, Scott, St. Clair, Stephenson, Union, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, White and Williamson.
    • The 27 contiguous counties in Illinois that were designated as contiguous disaster areas are: Adams, Bond, Bureau, Clark, Clinton, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fulton, Hancock, Henderson, Jasper, LaSalle, Macoupin, Mason, Massac, Menard, Montgomery, Morgan, Ogle, Peoria, Pike, Sangamon, Shelby, Stark, Warren, Whiteside and Winnebago counties.
    • Additionally, the following counties in Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri and Wisconsin were also included in the disaster designation they are contiguous:
      • Indiana: Gibson,Knox, Posey, Sullivan
      • Iowa: Clinton, Dubuque, Louisa, Scott, Des Moines, Jackson, Muscatine,
      • Kentucky: Ballard, Crittenden, Livingston, McCracken, Union
      • Missouri: Cape Girardeau, Lincoln, Perry, Scott, St. Louis,  Jefferson, Mississippi, Pike, St. Charles, Ste. Genevieve
      • Independent city: St. Louis
      • Wisconsin: Grant, Green, Lafayette

Other Global Disasters

  • Punjab, Pakistan. An outbreak of dengue fever in Pakistan’s Punjab province has claimed 25 more lives, “including a former cabinet secretary and a college professor,” raising the estimated death toll to at least 80, a report said.
    • “On an average, 600 to 1,000 dengue patients have been registered every day in Lahore alone for the past three weeks.”
    • Southern Sindh province. Dengue Surveillance Cell has reported more than 200 cases of infection in the flood-stricken southern Sindh province so far this year, most of them in Karachi, a report said.
  • Japan. Death toll from typhoon ROKE which struck Japan last week has climbed to at least 11, with 5 people still unaccounted for, Kyodo News reported.

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