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Posts Tagged ‘alaska volcano’

Pavlof Eruption Intensifies

Posted by feww on June 26, 2013

Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano ejects a plume 28,000 feet asl

Pavlof is erupting vigorously, exhibiting strongest seismic activity detected so far this year, characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent explosions suggesting lava fountaining and ash production, Alaska Volcanoes Observatory (AVO) reported.

The wave of intense activity started late on Monday and continued into Tuesday, with trace ash fall reported in the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano.

AVO Daily Update  – Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 12:33 PM AKDT (Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 20:33 UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37″ W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code:   ORANGE
In its daily briefing AVO said:

Vigorous eruptive activity indicated by a distinct increase in seismicity beginning around 6:50 UTC (22:50 AKDT) last evening is continuing. The level of seismicity for the past 11-12 hours has been the strongest seismic activity detected so far during the 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The seismicity is characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent small explosions that are likely associated with lava fountaining and ash production.

  • A distinct plume extending to the west of the volcano rising as high 28,000 feet above sea level (a.s.l.) according to Satellite data and pilot reports.
  • Satellite imagery also show strong thermal signals at the volcano summit.
  • AVO received a report of trace ash fall on the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano on June 25, 2013.

pavlof 7jun2013
Pavlof volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay on June 7, 2013. Photo credit: Robert Sigurdson, via AVO.

At this level of unrest it is likely that lava fountaining and ash emission are occurring. Lava fountaining is likely producing spatter-fed lava flows that are descending the flanks of the volcano over ice and snow and could be producing substantial steam plumes. These plumes probably contain variable amounts of ash. At the level of unrest observed over the past 11-12 hours, the volcanic plume has not been particularly ash rich; however, this could change if the character of the eruption changes and it remains possible for more robust ash plumes to be generated at any time. AVO is monitoring the eruption closely and will issue further information as it becomes available.

Mount Pavlof, one of the most active volcanoes in the U.S.,  has been erupting since May 13, spewing ash and lava at a low intensity.


Index map showing the location of Pavlof and other Quaternary volcanoes on the Alaskan peninsula. Volcano(es): Alagogshak, Amak, Aniakchak, Basalt of Gertrude Creek, Black Peak, Chiginagak, Cone 3110, Cone 3601, Dana, Denison, Devils Desk, Douglas, Dutton, Fourpeaked, Frosty, Griggs, Iron Trig cone, Kaguyak, Katmai, Kejulik, Kialagvik, Knob 1000, Kukak, Kupreanof, Mageik, Martin, Novarupta, Pavlof, Pavlof Sister, Rainbow River cone, Steller, Stepovak Bay 1, Stepovak Bay 2, Stepovak Bay 3, Stepovak Bay 4, Trident, Ugashik-Peulik, Unnamed (near Ukinrek Maars), Veniaminof, Yantarni. Credit Janet Schaefer/AVO

Veniaminof Volcano Activity [Source: AVO]

Continued volcanic tremors  suggest that the Veniaminof Volcano is still erupting, said AVO. Recent satellite images  show elevated surface temperatures at the intracaldera cone; webcam images from Perryville show a light-colored plume rising above the rim of the intracaldera cone, some 8,200 feet a.s.l.

It is possible for activity at Veniaminof Volcano to increase above its current level at any time and more vigorous ash emissions may result. Sustained periods of volcanic tremor may correspond with continuous ash emission which may not be detected in satellite data, especially if ash plumes remain below 15,000 to 20,000 feet above sea level. Brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions with ash fall limited to areas on the flanks of the volcano are likely to occur while the volcano is at its current level of unrest. A larger explosive episode and associated ash emission is not expected at the current level of unrest; however, this remains possible and would be evident in seismic and satellite data.

Current Volcanic Activity [as of June 26, 2013]

Alaska 

Cleveland YELLOW ADVISORY
Pavlof  ORANGE  WATCH
Veniaminof ORANGE  WATCH

Kamchatka Peninsula

Gorely YELLOW
Karymsky ORANGE
Kizimen ORANGE
Tolbachik ORANGE
Bezymianny YELLOW
Sheveluch ORANGE

Kurile Islands

Chirinkotan YELLOW

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Volcanoes in a Dozen Global Regions Erupting

Posted by feww on May 19, 2013

Angry Pavlof continues to belch out ash, gas and steam

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37″ W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Ash, gas and steam emissions continue at Pavlof Volcano, as  seismic tremors and intense elevated surface temperatures persist, AVO reported.

Pavlof volcano eruption column 18May2013 T-Chesley
Pavlof volcano eruption column, May 18, 2013 (12:00am AKDT). Photo courtesy Theo Chesley/AVO.

Other Alaska Volcanoes

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20″ N 169°56’42″ W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Elevated surface temperatures at the summit of Cleveland Volcano were observed in satellite images Saturday morning AKDT, AVO reported.

Hawaii Volcanoes

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-01-)
19°25’16″ N 155°17’13″ W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: At the summit, tiltmeters recorded the start of DI inflationary tilt and the lava lake level rose. At Pu`u `O`o vent in the middle east rift zone, there was no new activity within the crater but the Kahauale`a II lava flow remained active on the north base of the cone. To the southeast, the Peace Day pali flow remained active on the coastal plain while the main flow branch continued to enter the ocean in at least 2 locations spanning the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park boundary. Gas emissions remained elevated. (HVO)

Recent Observations at the middle east rift zone vents: Only glow was seen from the east lava pond and spatter cones on the crater floor. The tiltmeter on the north flank of Pu`u `O`o cone recorded the start of DI inflationary tilt at 8 pm yesterday. GPS receivers on the north rim and south base of Pu`u `O`o cone recorded neither extension nor contraction since May 12. The most recent (preliminary) sulfur dioxide emission rate measurement was 300 tonnes/day on April 26, 2013, from all east rift zone sources; these values have ranged between 150 and 450 t/d in 2013; these measurements are made at a greater distance from the sources where the plume is more easily characterized.

New Activity/Unrest
[Source: AVO, HVO, GVP and others]

  • Cleveland, Chuginadak Island (ALASKA)
  • Copahue, Central Chile-Argentina border
  • Dieng Volcanic Complex, Central Java (Indonesia)
  • Guntur, Western Java (Indonesia)
  • Mayon, Luzon (Philippines)
  • Pavlof, Alaska Peninsula
  • Popocatépetl, México
  • Tungurahua, Ecuador

Ongoing Activity

  • Kilauea, Hawaii (USA)
  • Kizimen, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Karymsky, Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Paluweh, Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)
  • Reventador, Ecuador
  • Sabancaya, Perú
  • Sakura-jima, Kyushu (Japan)
  • Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Tolbachik, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • Bezymianny, Kamchatka (Russia) YELLOW
  • Gorely Volcano  YELLOW

VONA/KVERT DAILY REPORT – May 17, 2013
Kamchatkan and Northern Kuriles Volcanic Activity

SHEVELUCH VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-27-)
56.64 N, 161.32 E; Elevation 10768 ft (3,283 m), the dome elevation ~8200 ft (2500 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

Moderate seismic activity continues at the volcano. Video images showed a moderate gas-steam eruption and incandescence above the lava dome. Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano.

PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-24-)
55.83 N, 160.39 E; Elevation 10119 ft (3085 m)
Aviation Color Code is ORANGE

Strong seismicity occurring at the volcano. The amplitude of volcanic tremor was up to 3.2 mcm/s. Explosive-effusive eruption continues: lava continues to effuse from the Southern fissure on Tolbachinsky Dol. A thermal anomaly was noted on satellite images at the northern area of Tolbachinsky Dol.

KIZIMEN VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-23-)
55.13 N, 160.32 E; Elevation 8151 ft (2485 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

Moderate seismic activity continues at Kizimen. Video images  showed growth of an extrusion at the volcano summit continues. Incandescence of the volcano summit, hot avalanches on the western and eastern volcanic flanks, and strong and moderate gas-steam activity accompany this process. Satellite data showed the volcano was obscured by clouds.

KARYMSKY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-13-)
54.05 N, 159.44 E; Elevation 4874 ft (1486 m)
Aviation Color Code is
ORANGE

There was no seismic data due to technical reasons. Satellite images  were obscured by clouds.

BEZYMIANNY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-25-)
55.97 N, 160.6 E; Elevation 9453 ft (2882 m)
Aviation Color Code is YELLOW

Strong seismic activity at Tolbachinsky Dol obscured seismicity of Bezymianny. WebCam images obscured by clouds.  Satellite data showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano.

GORELY VOLCANO (CAVW #1000-07-)
52.56 N, 158.03 E; Elevation 5996 ft (1828 m)
Aviation Color Code is YELLOW

Moderate seismic activity continues at Gorely. Volcano was obscured by clouds.

Related Links

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Redoubt Volcano settling down?

Posted by feww on July 1, 2009

Is Redoubt going back to sleep?

After Redoubt’s last explosive eruption about three month ago, the researchers at the Alaska Volcano Observatory say the volcano may be settling down. The aviation alert level has been lowered to code yellow (advisory), however, constant monitoring continues.

Redoubt has been oozing magma and ejecting steam since the last eruption on April 4, 2009.

“The last couple of months at Redoubt, we have been building a mountain,” said one of the researchers, referring to the colossal lava dome.

As of June 9, the giant dome had grown to approximately 67.5 million m3 in volume. the dome is unstable and can collapse  at any time, causing  explosions, and flooding the Drift River valley.


Redoubt from the east. Picture Date: July 01, 2009.  Image Creator: Cyrus Read. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Redoubt photo taken by DFR Webcam. AVO. Camera is co-located with seismic station DFR, approximately 12.2 km NE of Redoubt.

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY INFORMATION STATEMENT
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 4:38 PM AKDT (Wednesday, July 1, 2009 0038 UTC)

Redoubt Volcano
60°29’7″ N 152°44’38″ W, Summit Elevation 10197 ft (3,108 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Extended Information Statement

The 2009 eruption of Redoubt volcano began March 15th, 2009 with a steam explosion. Between March 22nd and April 4th, Redoubt produced multiple significant explosions that sent ash and gas clouds to as high as 65,000 feet (19.8 km) above sea level. After April 4th, the eruption continued with extrusion of a lava dome within the summit crater, eventually producing a blocky lava flow that currently extends ~0.6 miles (1 km) down the north flank of the volcano. Redoubt entered its 14th week of eruptive activity the week of June 22nd. More …

Related Links:

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Redoubt Volcano: Recent Images

Posted by feww on March 24, 2009

Redoubt Activity – Color Code RED : Alert Level WARNING

Local time: March 24, 2009 6:45 AKDT (March 24, 2009 14:45 UTC)

Eruption cloud from an explosion at Redoubt Volcano


AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) false-color satellite image showing the eruption cloud from an explosion at Redoubt Volcano at 3:31am AKDT on March 23rd 2009. Image was captured at 5:30am and shows the ash cloud passing over other volcanoes and heading NE towards Anchorage.
Picture Date: March 23, 2009 14:30:29 UTC . Image Creator:  John Bailey. Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.


Fine ash deposited on a windshield of the car during the 3/23/2009 ash fall in Healy, AK. Picture Date: March 23, 2009 15:38:00 AKDT. Image Creator: Pavel Izbekov. Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.


SEM image of ash particle from the 3/23/2009 ash fall in Healy, AK.
Picture Date: March 24, 2009.  Image Creator: Pavel Izbekov; Jill Shipman. Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.

Tephra deposits from the eruption of Redoubt Volcano


Photos of the flooding in Drift Valley and tephra deposits from the eruption of Redoubt Volcano. [more detailed caption to follow.] Picture Date: March 23, 2009. Image Creator: Game McGimsey. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.

Massive flooding in Drift Valley from the eruption of Redoubt Volcano


Massive flooding in Drift Valley from the eruption of Redoubt Volcano.
Picture Date: March 23, 2009. Image Creator: Game McGimsey. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.

Ash Plumes from Redoubt Volcano


Earth Observatory Images of Ash plumes ejected by Redoubt Volcano. Above image was acquired March 23, 2009
at 12:30am AKDT [Add 8 hrs for UTC.] The above Terra MODIS image was captured at 12:30 a.m.  March 23, just 16 minutes after the third large eruption. Two plumes of ash are visible: a long white plume reaching north, and a smaller one just northeast the volcano. Communities along the trajectory of the ash plume included Skwenta and Talkeenta. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the MODIS Rapid Response team.


The Aqua MODIS image  was captured four hours later, at 4:30 a.m. AKDT, just as the fifth large eruption began. At that time, the new ash plume was located directly over Mt. Redoubt. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the MODIS Rapid Response team. Instrument: Aqua – MODIS

Ash on the snow to the NNE of Redoubt


MODIS image from Terra, 23 March 2009, 2149Z. Courtesy of GINA. Ash on the snow to the NNE of Redoubt. Picture Date: March 23, 2009 21:49:00 UTC. Image Creator:  Jonathan Dehn. Image courtesy of the Geographic Information Network of Alaska.

Eruption events 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 from Redoubt Volcano on 22 and 23 March 2009


Montage of various satellite images, from different times, showing eruption events 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 from Redoubt Volcano on 22 and 23 March 2009. There were multiple eruption events, this number of seven is one preliminary interpretation and may be subject to change upon further review. Picture Date: March 23, 2009. Image Creator: Ken Dean. Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations from AVO: 2009-03-24 00:35 UTC

The eruption of Redoubt volcano continues and the color code and volcano alert level remains at RED/WARNING. Seismic activity remains elevated, but has declined slightly over the past several hours. The activity consists mostly of volcanic tremor with some discrete events.

  • AVO has received no new reports of ash emission since early this morning. The ashfall advisory has expired.
  • AVO’s web camera near the volcano is now functioning and meltwater flooding along the margins of Drift glacier is evident.
  • AVO has an overflight of the volcano in progress.

Related Links:

this post: 9 images +1  image link; 567 words; two links

    Posted in Aqua MODIS, AVHRR, Drift glacier, Terra MODIS, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

     
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