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Posts Tagged ‘Bordetella pertussis’

Whooping Cough Epidemic Declared in California

Posted by feww on June 15, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
SCENARIO 011
HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS RESPIRATORY DISEASES
PERTUSSIS [WHOOPING COUGH]
STATEWIDE EPIDEMIC DECLARED
.

3,458 reported cases, two infant deaths, prompt authorities to declare statewide Pertussis Epidemic in Calif.

The Golden State has reported 3,458 cases of the disease including two infant deaths, so far this year.  The figure is reportedly on track to reach or surpass the 9,163 cases reported in 2010—the last epidemic year.

California health authorities have declared a pertussis epidemic after a 20-folds increase in the number of infections was reported over that last two weeks. Statewide cases soared from about 90 per month to more than 800 since June 1, a two-week period.

Meantime, director of the California Department of Public Health has urged “all pregnant women to get vaccinated.” He has also urged “parents to vaccinate infants as soon as possible.”

Infants aged 12 months or younger face the greatest risk of illness or death from pertussis infection, said CDC.

What’s Pertussis (Whooping Cough) – sourced from CDC

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis.

These bacteria attach to the cilia (tiny, hair-like extensions) that line part of the upper respiratory system. The bacteria release toxins, which damage the cilia and cause inflammation (swelling).

Pertussis is known for uncontrollable, violent coughing which often makes it hard to breathe. After fits of many coughs, someone with pertussis often needs to take deep breathes which result in a “whooping” sound.

infannt diagnosed with pertussis
A female infant diagnosed as pertussis. Pertussis is a highly communicable, vaccine-preventable disease due to Bordetella pertussis, a gram-negative coccobacillus, lasting for many weeks and typically afflicts children with severe coughing, whooping, and posttussive vomiting.

Transmission [sourced from CDC]

Pertussis is a highly contagious disease found in humans and is spread from person to person by coughing or sneezing while in close contact with others. Many infants who get pertussis are infected by older siblings, parents or caregivers who might not even know they are carrying the bacteria. Symptoms of pertussis usually develop within 7–10 days after being exposed, but sometimes not for as long as 6 weeks.

While pertussis vaccines are the most effective tool available to prevent this disease, no vaccine is 100% effective. If pertussis is circulating in the community, there is a chance that a fully vaccinated person, of any age, can catch this very contagious disease. For those vaccinated, the infection is usually less severe.

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Washington State Declares Pertussis Outbreak an ‘Epidemic’

Posted by feww on May 22, 2012

Ten times more cases of Pertussis reported in 2012 than same period last year

Pertussis, aka whooping cough, is a highly infectious respiratory illness that can be deadly to young infants. The disease is caused by Bordetella pertussis bacterium, which spreads through coughing and sneezing [airborne droplets,] and has an incubation period of up to 14 days.

  • “There have been a total of 1,484 cases reported statewide through week 19, compared to 134 reported cases in 2011 during the same time period. Dates for the 2011/2012 comparison were based on LHJ notification date.” Washington State DOH reported.
  • Whooping cough affects about 50 million people globally each year and has a mortality rate of about 1 percent.


The overall incidence rate year to date is 22.0 pertussis cases per 100,000 Washington residents and the rate of disease in infants under one year of age, 114.1 per 100,000, remains higher than rates in all other age groups (see Table 2). This equates to an annualized overall rate of pertussis in Washington residents of 60.3 per 100,000 persons with a rate in infants of 312.2 per 100,000 should this trend continue throughout 2012. One hundred and one infants under one year of age were reported as having whooping cough and twenty-six of them were hospitalized. Of those hospitalized, twenty (77%) were very young (three months of age or younger).
Source: DOH 348-254 May 2012

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Whooping Cough: Calif Epidemic Claims 10th Life

Posted by feww on October 23, 2010

California whooping cough outbreak claims its tenth victim, a six-week-old baby in San Diego

The outbreak is the worst in 60 years, Calif health officials say.

Whooping cough (pertussis) is highly contagious disease, however infants under the age of 60 days cannot be vaccinated, medical sources say.

As of posting, about 6,000 have been infected in California; however, whooping cough has also become a nationwide concern.


Child with broken blood vessels in eyes and bruising on face due to pertussis coughing. Source: vaccine Information

“Pertussis is a cyclical disease that has had a five-year wave of historic patterns,” a spokesman for the California Department of Public Health said. “We are at the top of the five-year pattern [in California,]” he said.

In the late 1950s a record 13 people died from pertussis in one year, he said.

About 17,000 cases of pertussis were reported nationwide in 2009. In San Diego County 37 new cases have been reported so far this month.

Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory disease. It is caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis.

Pertussis is known for uncontrollable, violent coughing which often makes it hard to breathe. After fits of many coughs, someone with pertussis often needs to take deep breathes which result in a “whooping” sound. Pertussis most commonly affects infants and young children and can be fatal, especially in babies less than 1 year of age. (Source: CDC)


Pertussis (whooping cough) Progression. Source: CDC. Click image to enlarge.

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