Fire Earth

Mass die-offs from human impact and planetary response to the assault could occur by early 2016

Posts Tagged ‘carbon footprint’

Weekly Average CO2 at Mauna Loa Tops 400ppm

Posted by feww on June 4, 2013

Accelerating Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

Up-to-date weekly average CO2 at Mauna Loa

  • Week beginning on May 26, 2013:     400.03 ppm
  • Weekly value from 1 year ago:     396.43 ppm
  • Weekly value from 10 years ago:     378.57 ppm

Recent Monthly Average Mauna Loa CO2

  • April 2013:     398.40 ppm
  • April 2012:     396.18 ppm

Recent Global CO2

  • March 2013:     396.52 ppm
  • March 2012:     393.57 ppm

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Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Global Food Crisis | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

UAE, Australia, USA and Canada top list of polluters

Posted by feww on November 17, 2010

Most Unethical Countries Worst Polluters

UAE, Australia, USA, Canada, Netherlands and Saudi Arabia are the worst CO2 polluters: Report

The United Arab Emirates, Australia, the United States and Canada have the worst overall records for emitting carbon, based on their  current and historic emissions, says a report.


A new study, which rates 183 countries on their CO2 emissions from energy use, has identified United Arab Emirates (UAE), Australia, USA, Canada, Netherlands and Saudi Arabia as the world’s six worst polluters in relation to CO2 pollution.

UAE (1), Australia (2), USA (3), Canada (4), Netherlands (5) and Saudi Arabia (6) are the only countries rated by the report as ‘extreme risk’ because of their high CO2 emissions from energy consumption.

“The poor performance of UAE and Saudi Arabia is reflective of a near 100% reliance on fossil fuels and their use of energy intensive desalination plants to produce drinking water. Saudi Arabia was the 11th highest global emitter in 2008 with 466 MtCO2. However, the desalination process that produces 70% of the country’s drinking water accounts for 50% of CO2 emissions. UAE dropped 15 places from last year to take the bottom spot due to a huge 25% jump in its overall carbon output between 2006 and 2008 and a 20% rise in per capita emissions.  Maplecroft recognises that desalination is a positive way to address water security but high emissions underline the need to find more energy efficient innovations.” The report said. See full report.

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Posted in Emissions Bill, fossil fuel dependency, GHG, greenhouse gas emissions, greenhouse gases | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Arctic Warmest in 2000 Years

Posted by feww on September 3, 2009

You Like it Hot ?

“Recent Warming Reverses Long-Term Arctic Cooling”

Fig.final_10
New research shows that the Arctic reversed a long-term cooling trend and began warming rapidly in recent decades. The blue line shows estimates of Arctic temperatures over the last 2,000 years, based on proxy records from lake sediments, ice cores and tree rings. The green line shows the long-term cooling trend. The red line shows the recent warming based on actual observations. A 2000-year transient climate simulation with NCAR’s Community Climate System Model shows the same overall temperature decrease as does the proxy temperature reconstruction, which gives scientists confidence that their estimates are accurate. (Courtesy Science, modified by UCAR.) Caption UCAR.

Human activity forced the 1990s Arctic temperatures to warmest level of any decade in at least 2,000 years, a new research finds. “The study, which incorporates geologic records and computer simulations, provides new evidence that the Arctic would be cooling if not for greenhouse gas emissions that are overpowering natural climate patterns.” Researches led by Northern Arizona University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

The scientists reconstructed summer temperatures across the Arctic over the last 2,000 years by decade, extending a view of climate far beyond the 400 years of Arctic-wide records previously available at that level of detail. They found that thousands of years of gradual Arctic cooling, related to natural changes in Earth’s orbit, would continue today if not for emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

“This result is particularly important because the Arctic, perhaps more than any other region on Earth, is facing dramatic impacts from climate change,” says NCAR scientist David Schneider, one of the co-authors. “This study provides us with a long-term record that reveals how greenhouse gases from human activities are overwhelming the Arctic’s natural climate system.”

Darrell Kaufman of Northern Arizona University, the lead author and head of the synthesis project, says the results indicate that recent warming is more anomalous than previously documented.

“Scientists have known for a while that the current period of warming was preceded by a long-term cooling trend,” says Kaufman. “But our reconstruction quantifies the cooling with greater certainty than before.”

How Greenhouse gases overtook  a natural cycle

The new study is the first to quantify a pervasive cooling across the Arctic on a decade-by-decade basis that is related to an approximately 21,000-year cyclical wobble in Earth’s tilt relative to the Sun. Over the last 7,000 years, the timing of Earth’s closest pass by the Sun has shifted from September to January. This has gradually reduced the intensity of sunlight reaching the Arctic in summertime, when Earth is farther from the Sun.

Researchers discovered that  summer temperatures in the Arctic cooled at an average rate of about 0.2 degrees Celsius (0 .36 degrees Fahrenheit) per thousand years because of the reduced energy from the Sun. “The temperatures eventually bottomed out during the “Little Ice Age,” a period of widespread cooling that lasted roughly from the 16th to the mid-19th centuries.”

Even though the orbital cycle that produced the cooling continued, it was overwhelmed in the 20th century by human-induced warming. The result was summer temperatures in the Arctic by the year 2000 that were about 1.4 degrees C (2.5 degrees F) higher than would have been expected from the continued cyclical cooling alone.

“If it hadn’t been for the increase in human-produced greenhouse gases, summer temperatures in the Arctic should have cooled gradually over the last century,” says Bette Otto-Bliesner, an NCAR scientist who participated in the study.

Natural archives of Arctic climate

Researches reconstructed Arctic temperatures over the last 2,000 years using three types of natural evidence. Each of the three “field-based data” was indicative of the response, which ” different component of the Arctic’s climate system to changes in temperature.”

These data included temperature reconstructions published by the study team earlier this year. The reconstructions were based on evidence provided by sediments from Arctic lakes, which yielded two kinds of clues: changes in the abundance of silica remnants left behind by algae, which reflect the length of the growing season, and the thickness of annually deposited sediment layers, which increases during warmer summers as deposits from glacial meltwater increase.

Research also incorporated readings from previously published studies including glacial ice and tree rings that had been calibrated against the temperature records.

The scientists compared the temperatures inferred from the field-based data with simulations run with the Community Climate System Model, a computer model of global climate based at NCAR. The model’s estimate of the reduction of seasonal sunlight in the Arctic and the resulting cooling was consistent with the analysis of the lake sediments and other natural archives. These results give scientists more confidence in computer projections of future Arctic temperatures.

“This study provides a clear example of how increased greenhouse gases are now changing our climate, ending at least 2,000 years of Arctic cooling,” says NCAR scientist Caspar Ammann, a co-author.

The new study follows previous work showing that temperatures over the last century warmed almost three times faster in the Arctic than elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere. This phenomenon, called Arctic amplification, occurs as highly reflective Arctic ice and snow melt away, allowing dark land and exposed ocean to absorb more sunlight.

“Because we know that the processes responsible for past Arctic amplification are still operating, we can anticipate that it will continue into the next century,” says Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado at Boulder, a member of the study team. “Consequently, Arctic warming will continue to exceed temperature increases in the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, resulting in accelerated loss of land ice and an increased rate of sea level rise, with global consequences.”

The Study will be published in the September 4 edition of Science

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Posted in Alaska, alaskan forests, arctic temps, big oil, Climate Change, ecosystems collapse, Global Warming, Long-Term Arctic Cooling | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Mad dogs and Englishmen

Posted by feww on April 12, 2009

Accelerated Garbage Production to ‘Save’ Terminal Economy

EDRO’s Ultimate Human Conundrum

The most intelligent species on earth, human, in its quest for the total subjugation of nature has created the ultimate conundrum:

He measures his livelihood gains by the strength of GDP, and his ills by the size of carbon footprint.

The larger the GDP, however, the bigger the carbon footprint!

FEWW says: The exponential growth economy, which is committing human and many other species to extinction, is clearly not ‘designed’ to extend the ‘shelf-life’ of this planet; however, you fulfill its monetary goals for the privilege of participating in the 6th Great Extinction extravaganza.

The following article is by Reuters:

UK still mulling car scrappage scheme

Sat Apr 11, 2009

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain said on Saturday it was still looking into the possibility of introducing a car scrappage scheme to boost the recession-hit vehicle industry, despite a report that the Treasury was blocking the idea.

Under the proposed scheme, cars more than nine years old could be scrapped in return for a 2,000 pound discount on a new car.

The Times reported on Saturday that there was a deep rift between Business Secretary Peter Mandelson and the finance minister, Alistair Darling, over the proposal.


Gordon Brown, UK Prime Minister. Time to scrap ‘one-trick’ politicians (those with double-digit IQs) and let intelligent, non-affiliated individuals save the largest number of species possible. Photo: PA. Image may be subject to copyright.

The unsourced report said Mandelson wanted Darling to make a scrappage scheme the centrepiece of his April 22 budget but said Darling was concerned about the cost and terms of the programme.

“Officials from both departments are continuing to look at the possibilities of such a scheme. However, no decision has yet been taken,” a spokesman for Mandelson’s department said when asked for comment on the report.

A Treasury spokesman denied any rift between the ministers and said: “This is one of a number of measures the Chancellor (Darling) will consider in the run-up to the budget.”

The aim of the scheme would be to boost the car industry, whose sales have slumped due to the recession, while replacing older vehicles with more environmentally friendly cars.

A similar scheme in Germany helped lift new car registrations there by 40 percent in March.

British car sales were down 30 percent year-on-year in March.

The scrappage scheme is top of the wish list for Britain’s struggling car industry which is confident it will get a boost in the budget.

“At the moment the scrappage (measure) is getting more purchase … The Chancellor (Darling) has been keen not to have announcements made outside of the budget,” the chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), Paul Everitt, told Reuters this week.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown has said the budget will contain environmental measures to aid recovery from recession, creating thousands of “green” jobs.

But analysts say Darling has to balance the needs of the shrinking economy with the dire state of the public finances.

(Reporting by Adrian Croft; Editing by Anthony Barker). Copyright Reuters

“In all the gin joints in all the countries in all the world, they put people like Golden Brown, Peter Mandelson, Alistair Darling, David Miliband … in charge and you expect to have a home to go to?”

—Fom a reader email

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Posted in Alistair Darling, car scrappage scheme, Peter Mandelson, shrinking economy, UK budget | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Image of the Day: Clean Energy Demo

Posted by feww on March 4, 2009

Clean Energy, Same Insane Economy?

What’s the upper limit to how much ‘Clean Energy’ you could pump into the putrid corpse of the  economic monster?


Demonstrators for clean energy hold a rally on Capitol Hill in Washington March 2, 2009. The rally was organized by the group Powershift 09, which seeks to hold elected officials accountable for rebuilding the economy and reclaiming the future through bold climate and clean energy policy. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque. Image may be subject to copyright.

What’s the point of ‘clean energy,’ without a new ‘radical’ economy?

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Posted in CO2 pollution, Giga Trends, Mechanism of Collapse, Root Cause Matrix, World’s Collapsing Cities | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How Dirty Is Your Money?

Posted by feww on August 6, 2008

How Much CO2 Does Your Money Produce?

Did you know?

Each dollar you earn (or spend) produces 450g of CO2 pollution!

Original Entry >> Carbon Footprint of Your Dollar

Posted in Climate Change, energy, environment, food, Global Warming, health, politics, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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