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Posts Tagged ‘CLEVELAND VOLCANO’

Bogoslof Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on July 10, 2017

KT-623D

Bogoslof Explodes: Volcano Alert Level Raised to WARNING, Aviation Color Code to RED

AVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice
Volcano: Bogoslof (VNUM #311300)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Previous Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: RED
Previous Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Monday, July 10, 2017, 12:51 AM AKDT
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
Location: N 53 deg 55 min W 168 deg 2 min
Elevation: 492 ft (150 m)
Area: Aleutians

Volcanic Activity Summary: An eruption began at Bogoslof volcano at 07:47 UTC on July 9 (23:47 AKDT on July 9) lasting about 5 minutes followed 15 minutes later by a second explosion that lasted about 7 minutes. A small ash cloud has been detected in satellite data. Winds are towards the southeast. The Aviation Color Code is upgraded to RED and the Volcano Alert Level to WARNING. Ash trajectory models indicate that a possible trace ash fall could occur on Unalaska, but unlikely to affect Dutch Harbor.  https://www.avo.alaska.edu/

Nearby towns:

  • Unalaska 61 mi (98 km) SE
  • Nikolski 76 mi (123 km) SW
  • Akutan 93 mi (149 km) NE
  • Saint George 194 mi (312 km) NW
  • Anchorage 835 mi (1,343 km) NE

Cleveland Volcano
Color Code ORANGE / Alert Level WATCH

Pavlof Volcano
Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Hawaii Volcanoes

Kilauea Volcano
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

  • FIRE-EARTH Ref:  LMP7
  • FIRE-EARTH Science Team’s July VolcanoWatch Report is available via FEPS.
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Global Disasters/ Significant Events – 17 May 2013

Posted by feww on May 17, 2013

Pavlof continues to erupt amid near continuous seismicity

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
Location: 55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W,
Summit Elevation: 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Lava is fountaining at Pavlof summit, as the volcano continues to erupt, spewing continuous ash, steam, and gas cloudd to an altitude of about 20,000 ft above sea level, AVO reported.

This morning the cloud was carried to the southeast. Satellite images show persistent elevated surface temperatures at the summit and on the northwest flank, commensurate with the summit lava fountaining and resulting lava flow.

Seismic activity remains elevated with nearly continuous tremor recorded on the seismic network.

Pavlof in eruption 16 May 2013
Pavlof in eruption, May 16, 2013 at 04:00 PM AKDT. Photograph courtesy of pilot Theo Chesley/ via AVO

Pavlof in eruption-2-16 May 2013
Pavlof Volcano erupting on May 16, 2013. Photo taken from about 6,000 ft, at 10:20 am, by pilot Theo Chesley. This view is looking at the north side of Pavlof; the peak in the foreground is Pavlof Sister. Image courtesy of the photographer via AVO.

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Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

Cyclone MAHASEN Damaged or Destroyed Thousands of Homes in Bangladesh

At least a million people had been forced to flee low-lying coastal areas as the cyclone approached. However, the storm weakened rapidly prior to landing.

  • Nevertheless, it damaged or destroyed thousands of homes, mostly mud houses, and left dozens of people dead, including more than two dozen from  Myanmar.

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“Monster” Tornado Left 13 Dead or Missing, Destroyed Scores of Homes

The deadly tornado struck a subdivision of Rancho Brazos, near the town of Granbury in  Hood County, N Texas with winds of up to 200 miles per hour, and was rated EF4 by the National Weather Service (NWS).

  • “This tornado was a monster,” said Hood County Commissioner. “It’s just devastating.”
  • The tornado left at least 13 people dead or missing, with about 50 others injured, destroyed more than 120 homes, and displaced over 250 residents.

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Iraq Violence: 100 Killed, Hundreds more Wounded in 3 Days

At least 47 people were killed and many dozens wounded in two explosions in Baquba, a city located about 50 km north of Baghdad, and Madain located further south, reports quoting local  police said.

  • Since Wednesday May 15 about 100 people have been killed and hundreds more wounded in bombing campaigns across Iraq.

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S China Storms Affect 2 million people, Dozens Dead or Missing

“Ten provincial localities in south China have been affected by the fresh round of storms and flooding that began on Tuesday, including Anhui, Chongqing, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Sichuan,” said a report.

DISASTER CALENDARMay 17, 2013  
SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN:
1,030 Days Left 

Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.

  • SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,030 Days Left to ‘Worst Day’ in the brief Human  History
  • The countdown began on May 15, 2011 …

GLOBAL WARNINGS

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Second Alaska Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on May 16, 2013

Pavlof ejects ash and steam, as lava flows down its NW flank

Pavlof Volcano, the second Volcano in the Aleutians to become active, began erupting on Monday and was still spewing clouds of ash and steam on Wednesday, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said.

The volcano has been emitting intermittent dark clouds of ash and steam rising up to 20,000 feet a.s.l. and drifting in a northeasterly direction, the observatory said.

  • Mt Cleveland, the other currently active Alaskan volcano, has been erupting intermittently since 2011.
  • Volcanic ash from Pavlof and other Alaska volcanoes could pose a threat to air traffic in the region.

Pavlof Activity: Color Code ORANGE  – Alert Level WATCH

  • PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-) 55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W
  • Summit Elevation:  2,518 m (8261 ft)

pavlof
Pavlof Volcano in eruption. View is from the southwest in Cold Bay. Lava fountaining is visible near the summit, and steam and ash clouds rise from the northwest flank where a lava flow advances down the slope. May 14, 2013 11:26 AM AKDT. Credit: Rachel Kremer/AVO

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

Cleveland location map
Location of Cleveland volcano and other Aleutian volcanoes with respect to nearby cities and towns.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

The following report is mirrored from AVO

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 12:40 PM AKDT (May 15, 2013 20:40UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Elevated seismic activity persists and a steam and ash cloud are visible in web camera images rising occasionally up to about 20,000 ft. above sea level. A diffuse ash plume was reported late last night at an altitude of 15,000 above sea level and extending downwind to the northeast for up to 100 miles before dissipating. A recent pilot report today indicated a dark ash cloud extending east-northeast at an altitude of 20,000 above sea level. National Weather Service issued a Sigmet yesterday that remains active today.

Residents of Cold Bay, located 37 miles southwest of the volcano, observed incandescent glow at the summit during the night. Pilot reports and photographs from yesterday afternoon indicate that the lava flow extending down the northwest flank is still active and has generated debris-laden flow deposits, presumably from interaction of hot lava with the snow and ice on the flank.

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Elevated surface temperatures continued at Cleveland Volcano over the past 24 hours. No explosions have been detected by regional infrasound data. There has been no further information about the lava flow.

Sudden explosions of blocks and ash are possible with little or no warning. Ash clouds, if produced, could exceed 20,000 feet above sea level. If a large ash-producing event occurs, nearby seismic, infrasound, or volcanic lightning networks should alert AVO staff quickly. However, for some events, a delay of several hours is possible. Cleveland Volcano does not have a local seismic network and is monitored using only distant seismic and infrasound instruments and satellite data.

AVO will continue to monitor these volcanoes and issue additional information as available.

Code Definitions
ORANGE Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway with no or minor volcanic-ash emissions [ash-plume height specified, if possible].

WATCH: Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway but poses limited hazards.

VOLCANO INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET: http://www.avo.alaska.edu
RECORDING ON THE STATUS OF ALASKA’S VOLCANOES (907) 786-7478

CONTACT INFORMATION:
John Power, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

Jeff Freymueller, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
jeff.freymueller@gi.alaska.edu (907) 378-7556

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcano, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How Many Volcanoes Firing?

Posted by feww on March 7, 2013

Global Volcanic Eruptions 2013: Tempo Rising?


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W; CAVW #1101-24-) – [Group A on the Global Map]
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 12:14 PM AKST (Wednesday, March 6, 2013 21:14 UTC)
Summit Elevation: 5676 ft (1,730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Source: AVO

1338849660_ak52
Cleveland viewed from an Alaska Airlines 737 en route to Adak, Alaska. [Carlisle Volcano, center of image. Mount Cleveland, lower right of image.]

Date: May 31, 2012 12:00 AM
Photographer/Creator: Read, Cyrus. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.

1285607433_ak52
This GeoEye IKONOS image shows a faint plume issuing from Cleveland Volcano at 2:31 PM on September 14, 2010. Red in this image highlights areas of vegetation detected by the near-infrared channel
.

Date: September 14, 2010 10:31 PM UTC
Volcano(es): Cleveland
Photographer/Creator: Wessels, Rick
Image processed by AVO/USGS. Image copyright 2010 – GeoEye

KILAUEA VOLCANO (19°25’16” N 155°17’13” W; CAVW #1302-01-)
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 7:43 AM HST (Wednesday, March 6, 2013 17:43 UTC)
Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1,247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Source: HVO

Kamchatka Volcanoes on ORANGE Alert [Group J on the Global Map]

  • PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (55.83 N, 160.39 E; CAVW #1000-24-)
    Elevation:  3,085 m (10119 ft )
  • SHEVELUCH VOLCANO (56.64 N, 161.32 E; CAVW #1000-27-)
    Elevation: 3, 283 m [the dome elevation: 2,500 m)
  • KIZIMEN VOLCANO (55.13 N, 160.32 E; CAVW #1000-23-)
    Elevation: 2,485 m (8151 ft)
  • KARYMSKY VOLCANO (54.05 N, 159.44 E; CAVW #1000-13-)
    Elevation 1,486 m (4874 ft)

Other Kamchatka Volcanoes on YELLOW Alert [Group J on the Global Map]

  • KLYUCHEVSKOY VOLCANO (56.06 N, 160.64 E; CAVW #1000-26-)
    Elevation:  4,750 m
  • BEZYMIANNY VOLCANO (55.97 N, 160.6 E; CAVW #1000-25-)
    Elevation: 2,882 m
  • GORELY VOLCANO (52.56 N, 158.03 E; CAVW #1000-07-)
    Elevation: 1,828 m

Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands

  • Snow (Chirpoi Is.)  – YELLOW
  • Ivan Grozny – YELLOW

Recent Activity/ Unrest at other volcanoes

Ongoing Activity

Volcano/Earthquake Links

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic event, volcanic hazard, volcanic unrest, volcano, volcano alert, volcano images, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Lava Signs at Okmok Volcano

Posted by feww on July 26, 2008

Okmok Activity – Color Code RED : Alert Level WARNING

Okmok Volcano Activity Notifications
by AVO

The eruption of Okmok Volcano continued throughout this week with persistent ash emissions rising from 15,000 to 25,000 feet. From July 19 to July 20 the color code was increased to red in response to a more vigorous eruptive episode which produced ash to 30,000 feet. Photographs and an overflight by Alaska Volcano Observatory staff on July 20 and 21 confirmed the existence of multiple vigorous vents on the caldera floor.


Photo of the Okmok eruption, July 24, 2008, taken from Ft Glenn on the east flank of Okmok Caldera. Picture Date: July 24, 2008. credit : Lonnie Kennedy – Source: AVO

Seismicity was characterized by intermittent bursts of volcanic tremor early in the week. This changed to continuous mid-level volcanic tremor on July 23, which persists to the current time. Amplitude of tremor has been generally constant since July 21.

Although there has been little change in the eruption in the past several days, stronger explosive activity could resume at any time with little or no warning.

AVO Weekly Update – 2008-07-25 12:18:38

The eruption of Okmok Volcano continued throughout this week with persistent ash emissions rising from 15,000 to 25,000 feet. From July 19 to July 20 the color code was increased to red in response to a more vigorous eruptive episode which produced ash to 30,000 feet. Photographs and an overflight by Alaska Volcano Observatory staff on July 20 and 21 confirmed the existence of multiple vigorous vents on the caldera floor.

Seismicity was characterized by intermittent bursts of volcanic tremor early in the week. This changed to continuous mid-level volcanic tremor on July 23, which persists to the current time. Amplitude of tremor has been generally constant since July 21.

Although there has been little change in the eruption in the past several days, stronger explosive activity could resume at any time with little or no warning.

Cleveland Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

Cleveland Volcano Activity Notifications

2008-07-25 12:18:38 – Weekly Update by AVO
Based on reports from fishing boats Cleveland Volcano began erupting at approximately 12:00 AKDT (20:00 UTC) on July 21, 2008. This eruptive episode is more intense than that observed over the past several years. Pilot reports and satellite data have documented a persistent low level ash emission from 10,000 to 20,000 feet throughout the week when the volcano was visible through clouds. A large thermal anomaly suggests the presence of an ongoing active lava flow.

Related Links:

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Okmok Eruption, Cleveland Volcano [Update #2]

Posted by feww on July 16, 2008

Alaska Volcano Observatory

Current Status Report
Tuesday, July 15, 2008 11:49 AM AKDT (19:49 UTC)

OKMOK VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-29-)
53°23’49” N 168°9’58” W, Summit Elevation 3520 ft (1073 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: RED
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING

Okmok Volcano continues to erupt. Seismicity, though below this weekend’s intensity, has remained steady over the last 24 hours. Satellite data continue to show a long (~250 km) plume moving east; the height of the plume is approximately 30,000 ft above sea level.

The volcano is currently at aviation color code RED and alert level WARNING. All areas immediately around the volcano are considered hazardous. Airborne ash and gas continues to drift with the wind and pose a hazard to aviation in the area. Additional ash fall will occur on Umnak Island and possibly adjacent islands as long as the eruption continues.

OMI image showing the extent of the sulfur dioxide gas cloud from the eruption of Okmok Volcano. The large red mass is from the main explosive phase on 12 July at 21:30 UTC and is at an estimated height of 50,000 ft above sea level. The north-south dimension of this cloud is about 850 miles. Current emissions from the volcano are at a lower altitude of approximately 30,000 to 35,000 feet. Other OMI data (not shown) indicate that volcanic ash is mixed with the sulfur dioxide cloud. Picture Date: July 14, 2008 UTC – Image Creator: Dave Schneider – Data provided through the OMI near-real-time decision support project funded by NASA.

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY

Satellite and webcam views continue to be cloudy today. AVO has received no reports of eruptive activity at the volcano.

AVO monitors Cleveland Volcano with satellite imagery as weather allows. The lack of a real-time seismic network at Cleveland means that AVO is unable to track local earthquake activity related to volcanic unrest. Short-lived explosions of ash that could exceed 20,000 ft above sea level can occur without warning and may go undetected on satellite imagery. Please see http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Cleveland.php for more information.


Astronaut photograph of May 23, 2006 eruption of Cleveland Volcano. Image Science and Analysis Laboratory, NASA-Johnson Space Center. Original NASA Caption:

At 3:00 p.m. Alaska Daylight Time on May 23, 2006, Flight Engineer Jeff Williams from International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 13 contacted the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) to report that the Cleveland Volcano had produced a plume of ash. Shortly after the activity began, he took this photograph. This picture shows the ash plume moving west-southwest from the volcano’s summit. A bank of fog (upper right) is a common feature around the Aleutian Islands. The event proved to be short-lived; two hours later, the plume had completely detached from the volcano (see image from May 24). The AVO reported that the ash cloud height could have been as high as 6,000 meters (20,000 feet) above sea level.

Cleveland Volcano, situated on the western half of Chuginadak Island, is one of the most active of the volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, which extend west-southwest from the Alaska mainland. It is a stratovolcano, composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, compacted volcanic ash, and volcanic rocks. At a summit elevation of 1,730 meters, this volcano is the highest in the Islands of the Four Mountains group. Carlisle Island to the north-northwest, another stratovolcano, is also part of this group. Magma that feeds eruptions of ash and lava from the Cleveland Volcano is generated by the northwestward movement of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. As one tectonic plate moves beneath another—a process called subduction—melting of materials above and within the lower plate produces magma that can eventually move to the surface and erupt through a vent (such as a volcano). Cleveland Volcano claimed the only known eruption-related fatality in the Aleutian Islands, in 1944.

Small explosion at Cleveland volcano on July 20, 2007. This photo, taken from the USFWS research vessel Norseman, shows a small ash cloud rising a few thousand feet above the summit and drifting downwind. This type of intermittent explosive activity is likely characteristic of the current level of unrest at Cleveland. Such small ash clouds can easily go undetected on satellite imagery. Image taken from FWV Tiglax, from NE of Cleveland looking SW. Tana is to the left in the image, Kagamil and Carlisle off the image to the right. Dissipating plume from a small eruptive burst, likely Strombolian, from the summit of Cleveland volcano. Picture Date: July 20, 2007 – Image Creator: Doug Dasher – Image Creator: Max Hoberg – Photo courtesy of School of Fisheries, UAF.


Image of Herbert (left-most volcano), Carlisle (upper volcano) and Mount Cleveland (stratovolcano with small steam plume). Mission: ISS001 Roll: E Frame: 5962 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS01 Country or Geographic Name: USA-ALASKA Features: ISLANDS OF FOUR MTS.,SMK Center Point Latitude: 53.0 Center Point Longitude: -170.0 – Picture Date: January 01, 2001 00:11:15 GMT – Image courtesy of the Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center.


Location of Cleveland volcano and other Aleutian volcanoes with respect to nearby cities and towns.
Picture Date: February 06, 2006 – Image Creator: Janet Schaefer – Image courtesy of the AVO/ADGGS.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
John Power, Acting Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov, (907)786-7497

Steve McNutt, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
steve@giseis.alaska.edu (907)978-5458

Volcano Alert Levels

Normal
Volcano is in typical background, noneruptive state or, after a change from a higher level, volcanic activity has ceased and volcano has returned to noneruptive background state.
Advisory
Volcano is exhibiting signs of elevated unrest above known background level or, after a change from a higher level, volcanic activity has decreased significantly but continues to be closely monitored for possible renewed increase.
Watch
Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway but poses limited hazards.
Warning
Hazardous eruption is imminent, underway, or suspected.

Related Links:

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