Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘E.coli O157:H7’

Mysterious Outbreak of E. coli in 6 States

Posted by feww on June 9, 2012

E. coli outbreak NOT related to contaminated food: CDC

E. coli bacteria is linked to 14 illnesses, including one death, spread across 6 states.  Georgia has so far reported 5 cases, Louisiana 4, including a child’s death, Alabama 2, with one case each in Tennessee, Florida and California.

The source of outbreak, which occurred in April and May, has NOT been identified, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported.


Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli. Image Courtesy of the Helmholtz Center for Research on Infectious Diseases.


Transmission electron micrograph of E. coli O157:H7 showing flagella. Pseudoreplica technique. Photo Credit: Elizabeth H. White, M.S.; Content: CDC/ Peggy S. Hayes

See also:

“During the past decade, the emergence of drug-resistant E. coli has dramatically increased. As a consequence, the management of [urinary tract infections] UTIs, which was previously straightforward, has become more complicated; the risks for treatment failure are higher, and the cost of UTI  treatment is increasing,” said a report.

Related Links:

Other Global Disasters, Significant Events

  • New Mexico, USA.  Gov. Martinez has declared state of emergency in Catron County, where the largest wildfire in state’s history,  Gila National Forest wildfire (Whitewater Baldy Complex fire), has consumed about 275,000 acres, with less than a third contained.
    • The blaze is currently the largest active fire in the United States.
    • The fire was sparked by lightning on Wednesday May 16th, 2012.
    • The fire has a HIGH growth potential, with air temperatures exceeding 78ºF and humidity reported at less than 3 percent.
  • Russia. The authorities in Russia’s southern Stavropol region have declared a state of emergency in 8 districts amid severe  drought.
    • Drought has forced the authorities in Rostov also to declare a state of emergency in 3 districts.
  • Idaho, USA. Bonner County has declared a third state of emergency so far this year.  Heavy rain and high waters have flooded several areas washing out roads.
  • Edinburgh, Scotland.  The legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Scotland has grown to at least 74 confirmed and suspected cases.
    • One person has  died, at least 14 are in intensive care, and 44 others are hospitalized or receiving outpatient treatment.
    • Age of confirmed cases is between 33 and 76.
    • Meantime, a Scotish distillery, North British Whiskey Co.,  has closed down its cooling towers and halted production,  a report said.
    • The site in Wheatfield Road is close to the building site where the outbreak claimed its first fatality last week.

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012, global health catastrophe | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

E.coli infection kills a dozen Germans

Posted by feww on May 29, 2011

Ongoing E.coli outbreak: One of the worst in history

The Ongoing E. coli outbreak in Germany (and other European countries) has claimed about a dozen lives and sickened 1,000 others, 300 of them with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS)

The outbreak is “one of the largest [ascribed to] HUS worldwide and the largest ever reported in Germany,” the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control said.

“While HUS cases are usually observed in children under five years of age, in this outbreak 87% are adults, with a clear predominance of women [two-thirds.]”

The outbreak is also said to be the largest of its kind worldwide. The source of infection is thought to be Spanish cucumbers.


Transmission electron micrograph of E. coli O157:H7 showing flagella. Pseudoreplica technique. Date: 1995. Photo Credit: Elizabeth H. White, M.S. / CDC

The virulent form of E.coli can cause blood poisoning temporary anemia, profuse bleeding and kidney failure and affect the central nervous system, medical experts said.

Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden and the UK have also reported cases of HUS.

“It is possible that there will be secondary infections during this outbreak as well. These secondary infections work from man to man and they can be avoided. That’s why we have to do everything possible for better personal hygiene.” A  Munster university epidemiologist said, warning that the  infection was spreading.

The University Hospital Luebeck  in northern Germany was quoted as saying that it was treating 70 patients and was expecting to receive 10 new cases a day.

“E. coli O157:H7 is a bacterial pathogen that has a reservoir in cattle and other similar animals.  Human illness typically follows consumption of food or water that has been contaminated with microscopic amounts of cow feces.  The illness it causes is often a severe and bloody diarrhea and painful abdominal cramps, without much fever.   In 3% to 5% of cases, a complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can occur several weeks after the initial symptoms.  This severe complication includes temporary anemia, profuse bleeding, and kidney failure.” CDC said.


An image of E.coli bacteria provided by the USDA. The bacteria can cause diarrhea, dehydration, kidney failure and death. Image Number K11077-1 Low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. colibacteria. Each individual bacterium is oblong shaped. Photo by Eric Erbe, digital colorization by Christopher Pooley. Click image to enlarge.

Clinical Features

“Most people infected with E. coli O157:H7 develop diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (average of 3-4 days) after swallowing the organism, but some illnesses last longer and are more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by culture of a stool sample. Most people recover within a week, but some develop a severe infection. A type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can begin as the diarrhea is improving; this can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old and the elderly.” CDC said on its website.


A colorized version of PHIL 7137 depicting a highly magnified scanning electron micrographic (SEM) view of a dividing Escherichia coli bacteria, clearly displaying the point at which the bacteria’s cell wall was dividing; Magnification 21674x.

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that normally colonizes the digestive tract of most warm-blooded animals, including human beings. E. coli are facultative in nature, which means that they can adapt to their environments, switching between aerobic, and anaerobic metabolic growth depending environmental stresses. One strain of E. coli, O157:H7, causes an estimated 73,000 cases of infection, and 61 deaths in the United States each year. Infection often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. Most illness has been associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Person-to-person contact in families and child care centers is also an important mode of transmission. Infection can also occur after drinking raw milk and after swimming in or drinking sewage-contaminated water. Content Providers: CDC/ Evangeline Sowers, Janice Haney Carr. Photo Date: 2005. Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr

Related Links

Posted in environment | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Salmonella Risk Prompts 4th Massive Food Recall

Posted by feww on March 11, 2010

Recall nos. 37  – 42 since March 5, 2010

1.7 million pounds of RTE Beef and Chicken Products Recalled

Texas Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Beef Taquito and Chicken Quesadilla Products due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Windsor Foods, a firm with operations in Lampasas, Texas, and Oakland, Miss., is recalling approximately 1.7 million pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) beef taquito and chicken quesadilla products that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of beef taquito and chicken quesadilla products contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. A recall of the ready-to-eat taquito and quesadilla products containing the HVP was warranted due to the determination that the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company at (877) 653-2181.

USDA Recall Classifications: Class I Recall
This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. Salmonella infections can be life-threatening, especially to those with weak immune systems, such as infants, the elderly, and persons with HIV infection or undergoing chemotherapy. The most common manifestations of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within eight to 72 hours. Additional symptoms may be chills, headache, nausea and vomiting that can last up to seven days.

Recall # 38. Texas Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Beef Product due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Ruiz Foods, Inc., a Denison, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 115,700 pounds of a ready-to-eat (RTE) beef product that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of beef product contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Due to potential Salmonella contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. A recall of the beef product was warranted because the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

  • 8.4 ounce boxes of “TORNADOS RANCHERO BEEF & CHEESE.”

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company’s Consumer Line at 1-800-SPANISH or 1-800-772-6474 .

Recall # 39. Ohio Firm Recalls Ready-To-Eat Bacon Base Product Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Nestlé Professional North America, a Cleveland, Ohio establishment, is recalling approximately 6,000 pounds of a ready-to-eat (RTE) bacon base product that may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages of bacon base contain as an ingredient the specific Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP), which was previously recalled, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Due to potential Salmonella contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall of the HVP product on March 4, 2010. Although the HVP has already been recalled, as announced by FDA, the bacon base product packages bear the USDA mark of inspection on the outside of the case. A recall of this product was warranted due to the determination that the HVP ingredient was added after Salmonella prevention steps were applied.

  • 1-lb. plastic cups of “MINOR’S BACON BASE.”

Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company Customer Services at (800) 243-8822.

Recall # 40. Orval Kent Food Company, Inc. Voluntarily Recalls Culinary Circle Dips Due to Possible Health Risk

The Orval Kent dips are being recalled because they contain HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein) manufactured, distributed and recalled by Basic Food Flavors, Inc., Las Vegas, NV.

Consumers who have recently purchased the items listed below should not consume this product and should return it the store of purchase for a full refund or replacement.

Consumer Contact Information:
Consumers with questions may contact SUPERVALU Customer Service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 877 932 7948.

Recall # 41. Austinuts Of Dallas, Inc. Announces Voluntary Recall of Honey Mustard Pretzels

OR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Dallas, Texas – March 10, 2010 – Austinuts of Dallas, Inc. has issued a voluntary recall for

Honey Mustard Pretzels,
Lot number 61150/0280

because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The Austinuts Honey Mustard Pretzels were only distributed at Austinuts’ building sales in Dallas, Texas in 16 ounce clear zipper bags. Consumers having any of these products are urged to destroy them.

NO OTHER AUSTINUTS’ PRODUCTS ARE PART OF THIS RECALL. No illnesses have been reported to date in connection to the above product.

The pretzels were manufactured by National Pretzel Company of Lancaster, PA and were coated with a seasoning mix that included hydrolyzed vegetable protein recalled by Basic Food Flavors, Las Vagas, NV because it may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Consumers with any other recall questions may contact Austinuts of Dallas, Inc. (214) 739-6887 during normal business hours, Monday through Saturday 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM Central Time. Consumers with questions or concerns about their health should contact their doctor immediately.

Recall # 42. McCormick Recall Due to Possible Health Risk from HVP Ingredient Expands to Include Additional “Best By” Dates

McCormick & Company, Incorporated (NYSE:MKC) is expanding a March 5, 2010 recall to include additional “Best By” dates of products manufactured with HVP (hydrolyzed vegetable protein) supplied by Basic Food Flavors of Las Vegas, Nevada, because the ingredient has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Recalled products were distributed nationwide and sold in retail stores.  Two of the recalled products were also distributed for sale in international markets.

Contact the McCormick Consumer Hotline at 1-800-632-5847 or consumer_affairs@mccormick.com for a replacement or reimbursement.  Live assistance is available on the Hotline from 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday and 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST on Saturday and Sunday.

E. coli O157:H7 Contamination

Recall Notification Report
CLASS I RECALL: Wholesale Level

WASHINGTON, March 2, 2010 – Randolph Packing Co. Inc., an Asheboro, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 96,000 pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The products subject to recall include:

  • Combo bin packages of “Randolph Packing Co., Inc. BONELESS BEEF.”
  • Combo bin packages of “Randolph Packing Co. Knuckles 90% & 94%.”
  • 30 lbs. boxes of “Beef Ribeye Rolls.”

Each package label bears the establishment number “EST. 6590” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The products were produced on February 25, 2010, and were distributed to federal establishments for further processing in Ill., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, and Va. None of these products are available directly to consumers.

The problem was discovered through FSIS microbiological sampling.

Related Links:

Posted in food recall, salmonella, Salmonella poisoning, salmonellosis, Windsor Foods | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How old is your ecoli-burger?

Posted by feww on January 19, 2010

CLASS I RECALL – HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Another Unbelievable Mess by the Food Industry

Huntington Meat Packing Inc., a Montebello-based  Calif. company, is recalling about  393 tons (864,000 pounds, or the equivalent of about 14 million burgers) of beef products that may be contaminated with the potentially deadly E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) reported.

The tainted beef products have been  shipped mainly to California food outlets, USDA said.

The contamination was discovered during a Food Safety Assessment (FSA) by FSIS department. The FSA then determined that “a further investigation of establishment records was warranted.”

Ecoli bacteria
An image of E.coli bacteria provided by the USDA. The bacteria can cause diarrhea, dehydration, kidney failure and death.The Agriculture Department, which oversees meat safety in the US, said it concluded  “there is an association between the fresh ground beef products and illnesses in Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts,” after a cluster of food-borne illnesses in New England was reported, and a New Hampshire resident had died consuming ground beef that may have been infected with the deadly E. coli bacteria. More images

Details of Recalled Products:

The following ground beef products were produced by the plant between January 5, 2010 and  January 15, 2010, are subject to recall:

  • 40 lb. boxes of “Huntington Meats Ground Beef”
  • 40 lb. boxes of “HUNTINGTON MEAT PKG. INC. BEEF GROUND FOR FURTHER PROCESSING”
  • 40 lb. boxes of “BEEF BURRITO FILLING MIX”
  • 10 lb. boxes of “IMPERIAL MEAT CO. GROUND BEEF PATTY”
  • 20 lb. boxes of “IMPERIAL MEAT CO. GROUND BEEF PATTY”
  • 10 lb. boxes of “El Rancho MEAT & PROVISION ALL BEEF PATTIES”

Each box bears the establishment number “EST. 17967” inside the USDA mark of inspection on a label. The products were produced between January 5, 2010, and January 15, 2010, and were shipped to distribution centers, restaurants, and hotels within the State of California. FSIS has received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a physician.

In a subsequent inspection of the company’ss records, FSIS decided that additional products, as old as 2 years,  could have be adulterated because they may have been tainted with E. coli O157:H7. Therefore, the following products produced between February 19, 2008 and May 15, 2008, are ALSO subject to recall:

  • 40 lb. boxes of “Huntington Meats Ground Beef”
  • 40 lb. boxes of ” HUNTINGTON MEAT PKG. INC. BEEF GROUND FOR FURTHER PROCESSING”
  • 40 lb. boxes of “BEEF BURRITO FILLING MIX”
  • 10 lb. boxes of “IMPERIAL MEAT CO. GROUND BEEF PATTY”
  • 20 lb. boxes of “IMPERIAL MEAT CO. GROUND BEEF PATTY”
  • 10 lb. boxes of “El Rancho MEAT & PROVISION ALL BEEF PATTIES

Each box bears the establishment number “EST. 17967” inside the USDA mark of inspection on a label. The products were produced between February 19, 2008, and May 15, 2008, and were shipped to distribution centers, restaurants, and hotels within the State of California.

While these products are normally used fresh, the establishment is taking this action out of concern that some product may still be frozen and in commerce.

FSIS has received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these recalled products. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a physician.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers (including restaurants) of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef or ground beef patties that have been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to be sure ground beef is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

Media and consumer questions regarding the recall should be directed to the company owner, Robert Glenn, at (888) 894-8242.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

Safety Tips from USDA

SAFE PREPARATION OF FRESH AND FROZEN GROUND BEEF

USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline – 1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit http://www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked.

Consumers should only eat ground beef or ground beef patties that have been cooked to a safe internal temperature of 160° F, whether prepared from fresh or frozen raw meat products.

Color is NOT a reliable indicator that ground beef or ground beef patties have been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7.

The only way to be sure ground beef is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature.

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90° F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking

Related Links:

, , , , , .

Posted in Calif Beef, ecoli contamination, frozen beef, Huntington Meat Packing Inc., Montebello beef | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Beef recall, E.coli O157:H7 suspected

Posted by feww on June 29, 2009

20 people sickened by E.coli O157:H7

About 1/2 million pounds of beef recalled, E.coli O157:H7 contamination suspected

JBS-Swift Beef Co based in Greeley, Colorado, is expanding its June 24 recall  to a total of about 421,000 lbs of assorted beef products, USDA and the company said.

The recall is due to possible contamination by E.coli O157:H7 bacteria after about 20 people were sickened.  The recall includes meat products that were  processed on April 21 -22, 2009 and that have been sold nationally and internationally.

“The contamination may have come from further processing by other companies,” JBS spokesman said on Sunday.


Transmission electron micrograph of E. coli O157:H7 showing flagella. Pseudoreplica technique. Date: 1995. Photo Credit: Elizabeth H. White, M.S. / CDC

The recalled products are roasts and steaks rather than ground beef; however, the company cannot ruled out that  some of the beef may have been processed into ground products by intermediary resellers.

The products were  shipped to Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Wisconsin as well as overseas destinations.

A potentially deadly bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a strain of the bacterium Escherichia coli which causes foodborne illness. The infection often leads to bloody diarrhea, dehydration and occasionally to kidney failure, especially in young children, the elderly and persons with weak immune system.

The infections are associated with

  • Eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef
  • Drinking unpasteurized milk
  • Swimming in  contaminated water
  • Eating contaminated vegetables

In the US consumers can call 1-800-685-6328 for further assistance.


A colorized version of PHIL 7137 depicting a highly magnified scanning electron micrographic (SEM) view of a dividing Escherichia coli bacteria, clearly displaying the point at which the bacteria’s cell wall was dividing; Magnification 21674x.

Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that normally colonizes the digestive tract of most warm-blooded animals, including human beings. E. coli are facultative in nature, which means that they can adapt to their environments, switching between aerobic, and anaerobic metabolic growth depending environmental stresses. One strain of E. coli, O157:H7, causes an estimated 73,000 cases of infection, and 61 deaths in the United States each year. Infection often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. Most illness has been associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Person-to-person contact in families and child care centers is also an important mode of transmission. Infection can also occur after drinking raw milk and after swimming in or drinking sewage-contaminated water. Content Providers: CDC/ Evangeline Sowers, Janice Haney Carr. Photo Date: 2005. Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr

What is Escherichia coli?

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, while others cause urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses. Still other kinds of E. coli are used as markers for water contamination—so you might hear about E. coli being found in drinking water, which are not themselves harmful, but indicate the water is contaminated. It does get a bit confusing—even to microbiologists.

What are Shiga toxin-producing E. coli?

Some kinds of E. coli cause disease by making a toxin called Shiga toxin. The bacteria that make these toxins are called “Shiga toxin-producing” E. coli, or STEC for short. You might hear them called verocytotoxic E. coli (VTEC) or enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC); these all refer generally to the same group of bacteria. The most commonly identified STEC in North America is E. coli O157:H7 (often shortened to E. coli O157 or even just “O157”). When you hear news reports about outbreaks of “E. coli” infections, they are usually talking about E. coli O157. (Source: CDC.)

Related Links

This latest outbreak comes amid ongoing investigation into another Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7

Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to Eating Raw Refrigerated, Prepackaged Cookie Dough

Updated June 25, 2009

States Where Persons Infected with the Outbreak Strain of E. coli O157:H7 Live, United States, by State, March 1, 2009 to June 25, 2009

A map of the United States displaying cases of E. coli as of March 1, 2009 to June 25, 2009Click map to view a larger image.

Infections with the Outbreak Strain of E. coli O157:H7 By Date of Report to PulseNet

a chart showing, by month, infections related to E. coli O157:H7 reported to PulseNet.Click map to view a larger image.

CDC is collaborating with public health officials in many states, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to investigate an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections.

As of Thursday, June 25, 2009, 69 persons infected with a strain of E. coli O157:H7 with a particular DNA fingerprint have been reported from 29 states. Of these, 46 have been confirmed by an advanced DNA test as having the outbreak strain; these confirmatory test results are pending on the others. The number of ill persons identified in each state is as follows: Arizona (2), California (3), Colorado (5), Connecticut (1), Delaware (1), Georgia (1), Iowa (2), Illinois (5), Kentucky (3), Massachusetts (4), Maryland (2), Maine (3), Minnesota (6), Missouri (1), Montana (1), North Carolina (2), New Hampshire (2), New Jersey (1), Nevada (2), Ohio (3), Oklahoma (1), Oregon (1), Pennsylvania (2), South Carolina (1), Texas (3), Utah (2), Virginia (2), Washington (6), and Wisconsin (1).

Ill persons range in age from 2 to 65 years; however, 64% are less than 19 years old; 73% are female. Thirty-four persons have been hospitalized, 9 developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); none have died. Reports of these infections increased above the expected baseline in May and continue into June.

Investigation of the Outbreak

In an epidemiologic study, ill persons answered questions about foods consumed during the days before becoming ill and investigators compared their responses to those of persons of similar age and gender previously reported to State Health Departments with other illnesses. Preliminary results of this investigation indicate a strong association with eating raw prepackaged cookie dough. Most patients reported eating refrigerated prepackaged Nestle Toll House cookie dough products raw.

E. coli O157:H7 has not been previously associated with eating raw cookie dough. CDC, the state health departments, and federal regulatory partners are working together in this ongoing investigation.

Clinical Features

Most people infected with E. coli O157:H7 develop diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (average of 3-4 days) after swallowing the organism, but some illnesses last longer and are more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by culture of a stool sample. Most people recover within a week, but some develop a severe infection. A type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can begin as the diarrhea is improving; this can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old and the elderly.

Advice to Consumers

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning consumers not to eat any varieties of prepackaged Nestle Toll House refrigerated cookie dough due to the risk of contamination with E. coli O157:H7. If consumers have any prepackaged, refrigerated Nestle Toll House cookie dough products in their home they should throw them away. Cooking the dough is not recommended because consumers might get the bacteria on their hands and on other cooking surfaces. The recall does not include Nestle Toll House morsels, which are used as an ingredient in many home-made baked goods, or other already baked cookie products.

Individuals who have recently eaten prepackaged, refrigerated Toll House cookie dough and have experienced any of these symptoms should contact their doctor or health care provider immediately. Any such illnesses should be reported to state or local health authorities.

Consumers should be reminded they should not eat raw food products that are intended for cooking or baking before consumption. Consumers should use safe food-handling practices when preparing such products, including following package directions for cooking at proper temperatures; washing hands, surfaces, and utensils after contact with these types of products; avoiding cross contamination; and refrigerating products properly.
Advice to Retailers, Restaurateurs, and Food-service Operators

Retailers, restauranteurs, and personnel at other food-service operations should not sell or serve any Nestle Toll House prepackaged, refrigerated cookie dough products subject to the recall.

For additional information


Posted in ecoli, ecoli bacteria, Ecoli infection, Greenley, meat recall | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »