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Posts Tagged ‘Ebeko’

VolcanoWatch Weekly [9 July 2010]

Posted by feww on July 9, 2010

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest (30 June – 6 July 2010)

  • Ebeko, Paramushir Island  [Group J]
  • Gorely, Southern Kamchatka (Russia) —  [Group J]
  • Tiatia, Kunashir Island [Group J]
  • Ulawun, New Britain [Group K]

NOTE: Based on Fire-Earth Model, more volcanic activity/unrest may be expected in areas/groups shown in red.


Map of Volcanoes. Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

Other Volcano Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [6 Nov 2009]

Posted by feww on November 6, 2009

VOW: Kilauea

20091104_3687_mrp_L
Click image to enlarge.

20091104_3721_mrp_L
[Top] Activity at the west Waikupanaha ocean entry, where lava reached the ocean this past weekend, continues. The entry spans about 200 yards, with many small lava streams entering the water. [Above] On the east margin of the entry, lobes were advancing over a small black sand beach.  USGS/ HVO [Dated 4 Nov 2009] Click image to enlarge.

More images:

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Thursday, November 5, 2009 7:48 AM HST (Thursday, November 5, 2009 17:48 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-01-)
19°25’16” N 155°17’13” W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary for past 24 hours:
Growth and partial collapses of the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent cavity floor continued periodically obscuring and revealing the circulating lava pond surface. Sulfur dioxide emission rates from the Halema`uma`u and east rift zone vents remain elevated. Lava flows are active on the coastal plain. Lava is also flowing through tubes to the coast and entering the ocean at two locations west of Kalapana.

Past 24 hours at Kilauea summit:
The Overlook vent webcam images again showed fluctuating glow and spattering from a single elongated hole deep within the Halema`uma`u vent cavity; the rim of this hole was built progressively inward by spatter making the hole smaller until two more partial collapses occurred early this morning again revealing the circulating and spattering lava pond below. Glow from the vent was visible from Jaggar Museum overnight. This morning, a near white plume is moving southwestward and low over the Ka`u Desert. The most recent sulfur dioxide emission rate measurement was 500 tonnes/day on November 3, which is elevated above the 2003-2007 average of 140 tonnes/day. Small amounts of ash-sized tephra continued to be dropped from the plume near the vent.

Past 24 hours at the middle east rift zone vents and flow field: Magma continued to degas through Pu`u `O`o crater before erupting from the TEB vent, located 2 km to the east. The most recent sulfur dioxide emission rate measurement was 1,400 tonnes/day on November 4, which is close to the 2003-2007 average of 1,700 tonnes/day More …

Kilauea Spews More Lava

kilauea_ali_2009306
The rift zone on the eastern slopes of Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano has been erupting since January 1983, the longest eruption in recorded history. Pu‘u ‘O‘o and the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout vent—two centers of volcanic activity—emit steam and other gases in this natural-color satellite image. Lava currently reaches the surface at the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout vent and flows southeast (towards the lower right) through a lave tube to the ocean. Small plumes of gas reveal the path of the lava. In general, the youngest lava flows are black, and older, weathered, flows are gray or brown. Surviving vegetation is bright green.
The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s EO-1 satellite acquired this image on November 2, 2009. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided by the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Robert Simmon. Click image to enlarge.

SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(28October – 3 November 2009)

New activity/Unrest:

Ebeko, Paramushir Island | Galeras, Colombia | Karangetang [Api Siau], Siau I | Manam, Northeast of New Guinea (SW Pacific) | Nevado del Huila, Colombia | Soufrière Hills, Montserrat

GVP Volcano News:

INGEOMINAS reported that on 28 October a pulse of tremor from Nevado del Huila was followed by an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 8.3 km (27,200 ft) a.s.l. On 3 November, residents of Mosoco (20 km SSW) saw collapses from the W side of the dome generate small pyroclastic flows and incandescence at night.

MVO reported that during 23-30 October seismic activity from the Soufrière Hills lava dome was at a slightly lower level that the previous week. Numerous pyroclastic flows occurred in most of the major drainage valleys and rockfalls were concentrated in the S. On 29 October, a 40-m-high spine was seen protruding from the summit. —GVP

Ongoing Activity:

Barren Island, Andaman Is | Chaitén, Southern Chile | Dukono, Halmahera | Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka | Kilauea, Hawaii (USA) | Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia) | Krakatau, Indonesia | Popocatépetl, México | Rabaul, New Britain | Sakura-jima, Kyushu | Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia) | Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan)

Related Links:

More Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

Recent Posts on Chaitén:

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [28 Oct 2009]

Posted by feww on October 29, 2009

VOW: Nevado del Huila

Eight of Colombia’s 15 volcanoes have erupted in the last 100 years, and three of them since 1990: Galeras, Nevado del Huila, and Nevado del Ruiz.

nevado del huila
Nevado del Huila emitting ash [October 17, 2009.] As of posting more than a 1,000 tremors have been detected since Huila became restless on October 16, 2009. Photo: INGEOMINAS/Colombian Govt.

Nevado del Huila Emits Ash

huila_tmo_2009301
Nevado del Huila became active on October 16, 2009. Tremors indicating movement of fluid within the volcano, surface emissions of gas and ash, and other volcanic activity have been reported recently by the Colombian Institute of Geology and Minerals (INGEOMINAS). Towering emissions of volcanic ash have also been reported almost daily.    A column of ash reached flight level 11,000 meters (36,000 feet) on October 28, 2009. This natural-color image from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured the plume at 10:15 a.m. Thick gray ash is visible over the summit of Nevado del Huila, with a diffuse plume stretching northwest (towards the upper left corner of the image).     According to the newspaper El Liberal, ashfall in the surrounding areas was a nuisance, but not yet a serious risk to health. INGEOMINAS assigned Huila an alert level of Orange, meaning an eruption is probable within days or weeks. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Robert Simmon.

Volcano of the Week Details

Name: Nevado del Huila
Country: Colombia
Region Name: Colombian Andes
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 2009
Summit Elevation: 5,364 m (17,598 feet)
Latitude: 2.93°N
Longitude: 76.03°W
Source: GVP


Huila, the highest active volcano in Colombia, is an elongated, N-S-trending snow-capped stratovolcano, constructed inside an old caldera. The 5364-m-high volcano is seen here from the SW, with the northern peak (La Cuesta) on the left and the lower southern peak on the right flanking Pico Central, the volcano’s high point. Two persistent steam columns rise from the southern peak.  Photo by Juan Carlos Diago, 1995 (courtesy of Bernardo Pulgarín, INGEOMINAS, Colombia). Caption: GVP


An explosive eruption ruptured the summit of Nevado del Ruiz on November 13, 1985, spewing about 20 million cubic meters of volcanic ash and rocks into the air. Forty-meter thick lahars traveling at velocities of up to 50 kilometers per hour destroyed the town of Armero 74 km away from the explosion crater, killing more than 23,000 people. [Source: USGS]

SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(21 October – 27 October 2009)

New activity/Unrest:

GVP Volcano News:

PHIVOLCS reported that on 28 October a minor ash explosion from Mayon produced a brownish ash plume that rose 600 m above the crater and drifted NE.

Based on web camera views, INGEOMINAS reported that on 21 October continuous gas emissions rose from Nevado del Huila and pulses of ash emissions produced plumes that drifted E. Observations during an overflight on 23 October revealed that gas-and-ash emissions originated from two locations.

Ongoing Activity:

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

Recent Posts on Chaitén:

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Volcano Watch Weekly: 23 April 2009

Posted by feww on April 23, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 15 April – 21 April 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

  • Ebeko, Paramushir Island  (Russia)
  • Fernandina, Galápagos Islands  (Ecuador)
  • Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia)
  • NW Rota-1, Mariana Islands (Central Pacific)
  • Pagan, Mariana Islands (Central Pacific)
  • Paluweh, Lesser Sunda Islands (Indonesia)

VoW: Shasta

Volcano: Mount Shasta
Location: Siskiyou County, California
Latitude: 41.40 N
Longitude: 122.18 W
Height: 4,317 Meters  (14,161 Feet)
Type: Stratovolcano
Composition: Silicic andesite to dacite
Source: USGS (Cascades Volcano Observatory)


Mount Shasta and Shastina, California. USGS Photograph taken by Lyn Topinka, 1984 .

From: Miller, 1980, Potential Hazards from Future Eruptions in the Vicinity of Mount Shasta Volcano, Northern California: USGS Bulletin 1503

Mount Shasta is located in the Cascade Range in northern California about 65 kilometers (40 miles) south of the Oregon-California border and about midway between the Pacific Coast and the Nevada border. One of the largest and highest of the Cascade volcanoes, snowclad Mount Shasta is near the southern end of the range that terminates near Lassen Peak. Mount Shasta is a massive compound stratovolcano composed of overlapping cones centered at four or more main vents; it was constructed during a period of more than 100,000 years. … Two of the main eruptive centers at Mount Shasta, the Shastina and Hotlum cones were constructed during Holocene time, which includes about the last 10,000 years.

For more information including eruptive history and probable future potential hazard see: Mount Shasta and Vicinity, California


The most voluminous of the Cascade volcanoes, northern California’s Mount Shasta is a massive compound stratovolcano composed of at least four main edifices constructed over a period of at least 590,000 years.
Roughly 46 cu km of an ancestral Shasta volcano was destroyed by one of Earth’s largest known Quaternary subaerial hummocky debris avalanches, which filled the Shasta River valley NW of the volcano about 350,000 year ago.  The Hotlum cone, forming the present summit, and the Shastina lava dome complex were constructed during the early Holocene, as was the SW flank Black Butte lava dome. Eruptions from these vents have produced pyroclastic flows and mudflows that affected areas as far as 20 km from the summit. Eruptions from Hotlum cone continued throughout the Holocene. Shasta’s only historical eruption was observed from the ship of the explorer La Perouse off the California coast in 1786.  Photo by Dave Wieprecht, 1995 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP


The deposits of an exceptionally large debris avalanche extend from the base of Mount Shasta volcano northward across the floor of Shasta Valley in northern California. The debris-avalanche deposits underlie an area of about 675 square kilometers, and their estimated volume is at least 45 cubic kilometers. Radiometric limiting dates suggest that the debris avalanche occurred between about 300,000 and 380,000 years ago. Hundreds of mounds, hills, and ridges formed by the avalanche deposits are separated by flat areas that slope generally northward at about 5 meters per kilometer. The hills and ridges are formed by the block facies of the deposits, which includes masses of andesite lava tens to hundreds of meters across as well as stratigraphic successions of unconsolidated deposits of pyroclastic flows, lahars, air-fall tephra, and alluvium, which were carried intact within the debris avalanche. The northern terminus of the block facies is near Montague, at a distance of about 49 kilometers from the present summit of the volcano. The flat areas between hills and ridges are underlain by the matrix facies, which is an unsorted and unstratified mudflowlike deposit of sand, silt, clay, and rock fragments derived chiefly from the volcano. Boulders of volcanic rock from Mount Shasta are scattered along the west side of Shasta Valley and in the part of Shasta Valley that lies north of Montague, at heights of as much as 100 meters above the adjacent surface of the debris-avalanche deposits. The boulders represent a lag that was formed after the main body of the avalanche came to rest, when much of the still-fluid matrix facies drained away and flowed out of Shasta Valley down the Shasta River valley and into the Klamath River. About 300 years ago, three rockfall-debris avalanches occurred from domes at the Chaos Crags eruptive center near Lassen Peak. The Chaos Crags avalanches traveled as far as 4.3 kilometers from their source areas. USGS Photograph taken September 22, 1982, by Harry Glicken. Caption: CVO


Mount Shasta, California Debris Avalanche Deposit. Source: USGS – CVO

Ongoing Activity:


FEWW Volcanic Forecast:

(see: Sumatra’s Mt Kerinci Erupts )

1. The Loyalty – New Hebrides  Arc Collision. Intense volcanic activity should be expected throughout 2009 and beyond along the New Hebrides arc, the Vanatu region (also to the north to include Solomon Island and Santa Cruz Island), possibly continued along the New Hebrides Trench (to include Matthew and Hunter Island). Volcanoes that are located in the above-described area include:

  • Savo (Solomon Island)
  • Tinakula (Santa Cruz Island – SW Pacific)
  • Suretamatai
  • Motlav
  • Gaua
  • Mere Lava
  • Aoba
  • Ambrym
  • Lopevi
  • Kuwae
  • North Vate
  • Traitor’s Head
  • Yasur
  • Eastern Gemini Seamount
  • Matthew Island
  • Hunter Island

2. Pacific Plate subduction beneath the Okhotsk Plate. Subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Okhotsk Plate continues to create Intense volcanism. Starting 2009, however, a much greater than the average number of volcanoes located on the Kuril Islands island arc, Kamchatka volcanic arc and Japan trench to the south may erupt with renewed intensity.

Related Link and FEWW previous forecasts:

Posted in Chaiten, Galapagos Islands, Koryaksky, volcanic activity, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Weekly Volcano Watch: 9 April 2009

Posted by feww on April 9, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 1 April – 7 April 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Vesuvius


An aerial photo of Vesuvius. Source: solarnavigator. Image may be subject to copyright.

Country: Italy
Region: Campania
Volcano Type: Somma volcano
Last Known Eruption: 1944
Summit Elevation: 1281 m (4,203 feet)
Latitude: 40.821°N 40°49’17″N
Longitude: 14.426°E 14°25’34″E



One of the world’s most noted volcanoes, Vesuvius (Vesuvio) forms a dramatic backdrop to the Bay of Naples. The historically active cone of Vesuvius was constructed within a large caldera of the ancestral Monte Somma volcano, thought to have formed incrementally beginning about 17,000 years ago. The Monte Somma caldera wall has channeled lava flows and pyroclastic flows primarily to the south and west. Eight major explosive eruptions have taken place in the last 17,000 years, often accompanied by large pyroclastic flows and surges, such as during the well-known 79 AD Pompeii eruption. Intermittent eruptions since 79 AD were followed by a period of frequent long-term explosive and effusive eruptions beginning in 1631 and lasting until 1944. The 1631 eruption was the largest since 79 AD and produced devastating pyroclastic flows that reached as far as the coast and caused great destruction. Many towns are located on the volcano’s flanks, and several million people live within areas potentially affected by eruptions of Vesuvius. Photo by Dan Dzurisin, 1983 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP.

[Note: A somma volcano is a volcanic caldera in which a new cone  has grown. The name comes from Mount Somma, a stratovolcano that hosts the cone of Mount Vesuvius. Other examples of somma  include volcanoes on  Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia) and the Kuril Islands that extend from Kamchatka to the island of  Hokkaido, Japan.]

Index of monthly reports (GVP)

vesuvius|
Vesuvius Eruption photographed in March 1944. Image: John Reinhardt, USAAF.

FEWW Forecast: There is at least a 0.6 probability that Vesuvius may erupt by August/September 2009.

Ongoing Activity:

Posted in Batu Tara, Galeras, Kīlauea, Sakura-jima, Somma volcano | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Weekly Volcano Watch: 19 March 2009

Posted by feww on March 19, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 11 March – 17 March 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai, Tonga

Tonga Islands 20.57°S, 175.38°W; summit elev. 149 m – submarine volcano

An underwater volcanic eruption near the twin islands of Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai spewed a large column of  off-white smoke into the air. The plume rose to altitudes of about 8 km [possibly as high as 15km.]

tonga-ap
Hunga Ha’apai eruption [March 17-18, 2009] Aerial photo by Trevor Gregory/AP. Source. Image may be subject to copyright.

Observers flying near the area of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai (about 62 km NNW of Nuku’alofa, the capital of Tonga) on 16 or 17 March reported seeing an eruption. Photos showed an eruption plume with a wide base that rose from the sea surface and mixed with meteorological clouds. Based on information from the Tonga airport and analysis of satellite imagery, the Wellington VAAC reported that on 18 March, a plume rose to altitudes of 4.6-7.6 km (15,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.

Geologic Summary. The small islands of Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai cap a large seamount located about 30 km SSE of Falcon Island. The two linear andesitic islands are about 2 km long and represent the western and northern remnants of a the rim of a largely submarine caldera lying east and south of the islands. Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai reach an elevation of only 149 m and 128 m above sea level, respectively, and display inward-facing sea cliffs with lava and tephra layers dipping gently away from the submarine caldera. A rocky shoal 3.2 km SE of Hunga Ha’apai and 3 km south of Hunga Tonga marks the most prominent historically active vent. Several submarine eruptions have occurred at Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai since the first historical eruption in 1912. GVP reported.


The small islands of Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai cap a large seamount located about 30 km SSE of Falcon Island. The two linear andesitic islands are about 2 km long and represent the western and northern remnants of a the rim of a largely submarine caldera lying east and south of the islands. Hunga Tonga and Hunga Ha’apai reach an elevation of only 149 m and 128 m above sea level, respectively, and display inward-facing sea cliffs with lava and tephra layers dipping gently away from the submarine caldera. A rocky shoal 3.2 km SE of Hunga Ha’apai and 3 km south of Hunga Tonga marks the most prominent historically active vent. Submarine eruptions were reported here in 1912 and 1937 and from a fissure 1 km SSE of Hunga Ha’apai in 1988. Aerial photo by Tonga Ministry of Lands, Survey, and Natural Resources, 1991 (published in Taylor and Ewart, 1997). Caption: GVP.


Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano from space. Image captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite  on March 18, 2008. “In this image, the area around the eruption appears bright blue-green, likely resulting from sediment suspended in the water. The brilliant white patch at the center of the sediment-rich area may result from vapor released by the volcano. Northwest of the eruption site, a serpentine pumice raft floats on the water. The highly porous nature of pumice enables this volcanic rock to form floating rafts. (A larger pumice raft resulted from a similar eruption in the Tonga Islands in August 2006.).” Earth Observatory said.


A March 18 photo of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption as seen from the Nuku’alofa waterfront. Photo: AP/Matangi Tonga Online. Source. Image may be subject to copyright.

volcanoes-of-tonga
USGS Map of Major Volcanoes of Tonga with the approximate location of
Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano marked.


Photo dated
Wednesday, March 18, 2009. Source: Xinhua/AFP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Video: Underwater volcano erupts off Tonga

Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano

Flights were disrupted and airlines alerted after the undersea Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano erupted.  Air New Zealand flights were forced to divert to  avoid  smoke, which reportedly rose to a height of about 15 km, various media reported.

The volcano located about 12km off the southwest coast off the main island of Tongatapu  is thought to have erupted on Monday. Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai is one of about 40 submarine volcanoes in the area.

It’s thought that the eruption does not pose an immediate threat to the residents because trade winds are blowing the smokes and  gases away from the island.

“It’s a very significant eruption, on quite a large scale.” Said Tonga’s Geological Service Chief, Keleti Mafi.

Rumble III

On March 13, the underwater volcano Rumble III,  located about 300km northeast of Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, was discovered to have undergone a “startling change” losing about 100m of its summit, with the 800m-wide crater completely missing, apparently in a catastrophic explosion.

Metis Shoal

On February 3, FEWW forecast that Metis Shoal, a submarine volcano located midway between the islands of Kao and Late (about 50 km NNE of Kao), was about to erupt, or was currently undergoing a period of unrest.

FEWW moderators believe that both  Metis Shoal, if indeed it has erupted / is erupting, and Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcanoes may have been triggered simultaneously.

FEWW List of Forgotten Volcanoes

Ongoing Volcanic Activity:

Elevated Volcanic Activity and Information Releases

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 at 17:47:50 PDT.

The following U.S. volcanoes are known to be above normal background (elevated unrest or eruptions) or have shown activity that warranted an Information Release (for example, an earthquake swarm).

Times are local to the volcano and in 24-hr format.
Volcano Alert Levels & Aviation Color Codes defined at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem.

Volcano Hazards Program Webcams page links to webcams at 19 of the 169 active volcanoes in the U-S.

Related Links:

Posted in Chaiten, Galeras, Metis Shoal, Redoubt, Rumble III | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Volcano Watch: 17 February 2009

Posted by msrb on February 19, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 11 February – 17 February 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Volcano of the Week: Ebeko

Country:    Russia
Region   :    Kuril Islands

Volcano Type:     Somma volcano
Last Known Eruption:     2005
Summit Elevation:   1,156 m     (3,793 feet)
Latitude:     50.68°N     (50°41’0″N)
Longitude:     156.02°E    (156°1’0″)


An ash-bearing eruption column rises above the North crater of Ebeko volcano on September 9, 1989. An explosive eruption that began on February 2, 1989 continued until April 1990. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, which occupies the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones at the northern end of Paramushir Island. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Photo courtesy of Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team, 1989. Caption: GVP

The Tokyo VAAC reported an ash plume which drifted NE from Ebeko at an altitude of 0.6 km. Another ash plume was detected drifting SW at an altitude of 1.2 km ft.

Geologic Summary. The flat-topped summit of the central cone of Ebeko volcano, one of the most active in the Kuril Islands, occupies the northern end of Paramushir Island. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, at the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones. The eastern part of the southern crater of Ebeko contains strong solfataras and a large boiling spring. The central crater of Ebeko is filled by a lake about 20 m deep whose shores are lined with steaming solfataras; the northern crater lies across a narrow, low barrier from the central crater and contains a small, cold crescentic lake. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Intense fumarolic activity occurs in the summit craters of Ebeko, on the outer flanks of the cone, and in lateral explosion craters. GVP

Ongoing Activity:

Posted in Arenal, fumarolic activity, Kamchatka, Paramushir Island, Shishaldin | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »