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Posts Tagged ‘emerging infectious diseases’

Emerging Infectious Diseases – Update 089901

Posted by feww on August 17, 2017

All Groups

Emerging Infectious Diseases – Update 089901

[Issued by FIRE-EARTH Science]

  • ALERT details available from FIRE-EARTH PULSARS.

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Infectious Diseases Kill 1,448 Chinese in October: Report

Posted by feww on November 18, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
DEADLY CONTAGIOUS DISEASES
SCENARIOS 993, 797, 444, 080, 011, 01
.

Infectious Diseases kill 1,448 Chinese, sicken more than 608,000 in October

[Reported cases of] infectious diseases in mainland China killed  at least 1,448 people and sickened more than 609,000 people in October, Xinhua quoted the health officials as saying.

Plague, a Category A infectious disease, killed at least two people, said the report.

Infectious diseases in Category B were responsible for the bulk of the fatalities (1,421 cases reported), with Hepatitis, tuberculosis, syphilis, dengue and diarrhea being the deadliest.

Category C infectious diseases killed 25 people in October, said China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) classifies the Emerging Infectious Diseases in categories A, B and C as follows:

Category A pathogens are those organisms/biological agents that pose the highest risk to national security and public health because they

  • Can be easily disseminated or transmitted from person to person
  • Result in high mortality rates and have the potential for major public health impact
  • Might cause public panic and social disruption
  • Require special action for public health preparedness

Category A Priority Pathogens

Category B pathogens are the second highest priority organisms/biological agents. They

  • Are moderately easy to disseminate
  • Result in moderate morbidity rates and low mortality rates
  • Require specific enhancements for diagnostic capacity and enhanced disease surveillance

Category B Priority Pathogens

  • Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis)
  • Coxiella burnetii (Q fever)
  • Brucella species (brucellosis)
  • Burkholderia mallei (glanders)
  • Chlamydia psittaci (Psittacosis)
  • Ricin toxin (Ricinus communis)
  • Epsilon toxin (Clostridium perfringens)
  • Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB)
  • Typhus fever (Rickettsia prowazekii)
  • Food- and waterborne pathogens
  • Mosquito-borne encephalitis viruses
    • West Nile virus (WNV)
    • LaCrosse encephalitis (LACV)
    • California encephalitis
    • Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE)
    • Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE)
    • Western equine encephalitis (WEE)
    • Japanese encephalitis virus (JE)
    • St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV)

Category C pathogens are the third highest priority and include emerging pathogens that could be engineered for mass dissemination in the future because of

  • Availability
  • Ease of production and dissemination
  • Potential for high morbidity and mortality rates and major health impact

Category C Priority Pathogens

  • Nipah and Hendra viruses
  • Additional hantaviruses
  • Tickborne hemorrhagic fever viruses
    • Bunyaviruses
      • Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome virus (SFTSV), Heartland virus
    • Flaviruses
      • Omsk Hemorrhagic Fever virus, Alkhurma virus, Kyasanur Forest virus
  • Tickborne encephalitis complex flaviviruses
    • Tickborne encephalitis viruses
    • European subtype
    • Far Eastern subtype
    • Siberian subtype
    • Powassan/Deer Tick virus
  • Yellow fever virus
  • Tuberculosis, including drug-resistant TB
  • Influenza virus
  • Other Rickettsias
  • Rabies virus
  • Prions
  • Chikungunya virus
  • Coccidioides spp.
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), MERS-CoV, and other highly pathogenic human coronaviruses (new in FY14)
  • Antimicrobial resistance, excluding research on sexually transmitted organisms*
    • Research on mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance
    • Studies of the emergence and/or spread of antimicrobial resistance genes within pathogen populations
    • Studies of the emergence and/or spread of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens in human populations
    • Research on therapeutic approaches that target resistance mechanisms
    • Modification of existing antimicrobials to overcome emergent resistance
  • Antimicrobial research, as related to engineered threats and naturally occurring drug-resistant pathogens, focused on development of broad-spectrum antimicrobials

*NIAID Category C Antimicrobial Resistance—Sexually Transmitted Organisms Excluded

  • Bacterial vaginosis, Chlamydia trachomatis, cytomegalovirus, Granuloma inguinale, Hemophilus ducreyi, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhea, Treponema pallidum, Trichomonas vaginalis

 

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MERS Deaths Surge to 282 in Saudi Arabia

Posted by feww on June 4, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
DEADLY MERS VIRUS
SCENARIO 011
.

Saudi Arabia revises up MERS mortalities

Saudi Arabian health officials finally admitted that many more people have died from the MERS infection than previously reported. 

The Saudi health ministry on Tuesday said that a review of data on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) had shown that there were in fact 688 cases in the country with 282 mortalities reported.

Before the review, the ministry’s latest figures were 575 infections, with 190 deaths.

The new figures increase the official mortality rate from MERS to 41 percent, up from 33 percent previously.

The announcement came a day after the country’s deputy health minister was fired. The sacking followed that of the health minister in April.

MERS-CoV Cases Worldwide

FIRE-EARTH Models project the total cases of MERS-CoV infections worldwide at 804 with 363 mortalities, as of June 3, 2014. See also previous projection.

What’s MERS?

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory illness  caused by a coronavirus called “Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).”

Symptoms

MERS symptoms include fever and pneumonia leading to kidney failure and often death. Most victims who got infected with MERS-CoV developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of them died. Some people were reported as having a mild respiratory illness within 14 days after traveling from countries in the Arabian Peninsula or neighboring countries.

MERS Virus
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

MERS was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It is caused by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. Most people who have been confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection developed severe acute respiratory illness. They had fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of these people died.

MERS-CoV is not the same coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. However, like the SARS virus, MERS-CoV is most similar to coronaviruses found in bats. –CDC

Countries with Lab-Confirmed MERS – Reported Cases Since April 2012

  • Egypt
  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Malaysia
  • Netherlands
  • Oman
  • Philippines
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • United Kingdom (UK)
  • United Arab Emirates (UAE)
  • Unites States of America (USA)
  • Yemen

Source of MERS

MERS-CoV has been “extraordinarily common” in camels since the 1990s, and it may have evolved after being passed to humans, according to a recent study.  The virus has been found in camels in Qatar and a bat in Saudi Arabia. Camels in a few other countries have also tested positive for antibodies to MERS-CoV.

Doctors Resigning for Fear of Infection

At least four doctors at a Jeddah hospital resigned in April after refusing to treat MERS patients for fear of infection, said reports.

MERS a Year Ago

A total of 38 infected cases had been reported in Saudi Arabia, 49 worldwide, as of May 30, 2013.

Related Links

Links to Other Infectious Diseases

Posted in Climate Change, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global health catastrophe, health, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Deadly Hog Virus Re-infects Indiana Farm

Posted by feww on May 28, 2014

EMERGING and RE-Emerging INFECTIOUS DISEASES
2ND OUTBREAK OF DEADLY PEDV
SCENARIO 011
.

Second Outbreak of Deadly PEDV Reported in U.S.

An Indiana farm has confirmed a second outbreak of the deadly Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV), fueling concerns the deadly disease, which has wiped out 10 percent of the U.S. hog population since last year, will be harder to contain than previously thought.

The rest of this exclusive report is posted at:  Deadly pig virus re-infects U.S. farm, fuels supply fears

The highly contagious disease has killed about 7 million U.S. hogs since it was first diagnosed last year and seriously threatens pork production across the country.

About 6,000 separate cases of the virus have been reported in 29 states across the nation, as of April 22, 2014. The U.S. has about 68,300 hog farms, according to USDA.

Virus Strain PC21A is a  highly contagious coronavirus that causes porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). It was first reported in the United States in May 2013 in Iowa.  The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has since spread rapidly throughout the U.S., according to reports filed with CDC.

13-1685-F1
Electron micrograph of a US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) particle detected in a field fecal sample collected during a 2013 outbreak of PED on a farm in Ohio, USA; the fecal sample from which PEDV strain PC21A in this study was detected was from a pig on the same farm during the same outbreak. The sample was negatively stained with 3% phosphotungstic acid. Scale bar = 50 nm. Source: CDC – “Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs”

Related Links

 

Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global health catastrophe, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

MERS Infection Kills More People

Posted by feww on May 17, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
DEADLY MERS
SCENARIO 011
.

Saudi Arabia reports five new MERS cases and three additional deaths

Saudi health authorities reported five new Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases and three additional deaths from the infection on Friday.

The latest figures raise the total number of reported cases in Saudi Arabia to at least 520, including 163 fatalities

MERS Cases Worldwide

FIRE-EARTH Models project the total cases of MERS-CoV infections worldwide at 650 with 210 fatalities, as of May 17, 2014.

What’s MERS?

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory illness  caused by a coronavirus called “Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).”

Symptoms

MERS symptoms include fever and pneumonia leading to kidney failure and often death. Most victims who got infected with MERS-CoV developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of them died. Some people were reported as having a mild respiratory illness within 14 days after traveling from countries in the Arabian Peninsula or neighboring countries.

MERS Virus
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

MERS was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It is caused by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. Most people who have been confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection developed severe acute respiratory illness. They had fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of these people died.

MERS-CoV is not the same coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. However, like the SARS virus, MERS-CoV is most similar to coronaviruses found in bats. –CDC

Countries with Lab-Confirmed MERS – Reported Cases Since April 2012

  • Egypt
  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Malaysia
  • Netherlands
  • Oman
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • United Kingdom (UK)
  • United Arab Emirates (UAE)
  • Unites States of America (USA)
  • Yemen

Source of MERS

MERS-CoV has been “extraordinarily common” in camels since the 1990s, and it may have evolved after being passed to humans, according to a recent study.  The virus has been found in camels in Qatar and a bat in Saudi Arabia. Camels in a few other countries have also tested positive for antibodies to MERS-CoV.

Doctors Resigning for Fear of Infection

At least four doctors at a Jeddah hospital resigned in April after refusing to treat MERS patients for fear of infection, said reports.

MERS a Year Ago

A total of 38 infected cases had been reported in Saudi Arabia, 49 worldwide, as of May 30, 2013.

Related Links

Links to Other Infectious Diseases

Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global health catastrophe, health | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

2ND Case of MERS Reported in U.S.

Posted by feww on May 13, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
DEADLY MERS
SCENARIO 011
.

MERS infected traveler from Saudi Arabia hospitalized in Florida: CDC

CDC has confirmed a second imported case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)  in the United States. The patient is identified as a healthcare worker who resides and works in Saudi Arabia.

The first U.S. imported case of MERS was reported on May 2 in Indiana. Both imported MERS cases in the U.S. are healthcare workers who recently worked in and traveled from Saudi Arabia. However, the CDC says the two cases are unrelated.

“This second confirmed case of MERS in a person who worked in health care from an area of risk is not surprising,” said CDC Director. “To continue to strengthen our own health security, we need to increase our global ability to support other countries to help them find and stop threats such as MERS promptly, and to prevent them whenever possible.”

The patient flew  from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia to Orlando, Florida, via London, England, Boston and Atlanta on May 1. The patient reported feeling unwell during the flight with reported symptoms that include fever, chills and a slight cough. On May 9, the patient was admitted to the emergency department of a hospital in Florida. “The patient is isolated, being well cared for, and is currently doing well.”

The Florida Department of Health officials tested the patient for MERS Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the virus that causes MERS. Those tests were positive, and CDC confirmed MERS-CoV infection in the patient late last night.

“Given the dramatic increase in MERS cases in the Arabian Peninsula, we expected and are prepared for additional imported cases,” said the assistant surgeon general and director of CDC’s National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases. “The reason for this increase in cases is not yet known, but public health investigations are ongoing, and we are pleased to have a team in Saudi Arabia supporting some of those efforts.”

MERS in Saudi Arabia

Reported MERS cases in Saudi Arabia climbed to 491 on Monday, including 147 deaths, the Health Ministry has confirmed.

Six new cases were reported yesterday including patients that are  in critical condition.

MERS Cases Worldwide

As of May 12th, 2014, “a total of 538 laboratory-confirmed cases including 145 deaths due to MERS Coronavirus infection have been reported.  Saudi Arabia alone has reported 450 lab-confirmed cases and 112 deaths,” according to CDC.  [The CDC figures do NOT coincide with the data released by the Saudi  Health Ministry. Editor]

What’s MERS?

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a viral respiratory illness  caused by a coronavirus called “Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).”

Symptoms

MERS symptoms include fever and pneumonia leading to kidney failure and often death. Most victims who got infected with MERS-CoV developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of them died. Some people were reported as having a mild respiratory illness within 14 days after traveling from countries in the Arabian Peninsula or neighboring countries.

MERS Virus
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

MERS was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. It is caused by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. Most people who have been confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection developed severe acute respiratory illness. They had fever, cough, and shortness of breath. About half of these people died.

MERS-CoV is not the same coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. However, like the SARS virus, MERS-CoV is most similar to coronaviruses found in bats. –CDC

 Countries with Lab-Confirmed MERS – Reported Cases Since April 2012

  • Egypt (see below)
  • France
  • Greece
  • Italy
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Malaysia
  • Oman
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • United Kingdom (UK)
  • United Arab Emirates (UAE)
  • Unites States of America (USA)
  • Yemen

Source of MERS

MERS-CoV has been “extraordinarily common” in camels since the 1990s, and it may have evolved after being passed to humans, according to a recent study.  The virus has been found in camels in Qatar and a bat in Saudi Arabia. Camels in a few other countries have also tested positive for antibodies to MERS-CoV.

Doctors Resigning for Fear of Infection

At least four doctors at a Jeddah hospital resigned in April after refusing to treat MERS patients for fear of infection, said reports.

Egypt’s Reports First Case of MERS-CoV

Egypt reported its first case  of MERS two weeks ago. A man in his twenties who  had recently returned from Saudi Arabia, and showed symptoms of the infection, tested positive for MERS-CoV, according to a report.

MERS a Year Ago

A total of 38 infected cases had been reported in Saudi Arabia, 49 worldwide, as of May 30, 2013.

Related Links

Links to Other Infectious Diseases

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Global Health Emergency Declared as Poliovirus Spreads

Posted by feww on May 5, 2014

EMERGING & RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
INTERNATIONAL SPREAD OF WILD POLIOVIRUS
GLOBAL HEALTH EMERGENCY
NIGHTMARE SCENARIO 011
.

Global Health Emergency Declared as Wild Poliovirus Spreads

The international spread of wild poliovirus in 2014 is a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC),” the Director General of WHO  declared on 5 May 2014, based on the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee’s assessment.

“… the international spread of polio to date in 2014 constitutes an ‘extraordinary event’ and a public health risk to other states for which a co-ordinated international response is essential,” said the WHO’s Emergency Committee.

At end-2013, 60% of polio cases were the result of international spread of wild poliovirus, and there was increasing evidence that adult travellers contributed to this spread. During the 2014 low transmission season there has already been international spread of wild poliovirus from 3 of the 10 States that are currently infected: in central Asia (from Pakistan to Afghanistan), in the Middle East (Syrian Arab Republic to Iraq) and in Central Africa (Cameroon to Equatorial Guinea). A coordinated international response is deemed essential to stop this international spread of wild poliovirus and to prevent new spread with the onset of the high transmission season in May/June 2014; unilateral measures may prove less effective in stopping international spread than a coordinated response. The consequences of further international spread are particularly acute today given the large number of polio-free but conflict-torn and fragile States which have severely compromised routine immunization services and are at high risk of re-infection. Such States would experience extreme difficulty in mounting an effective response were wild poliovirus to be reintroduced. As much international spread occurs across land borders, WHO should continue to facilitate a coordinated regional approach to accelerate interruption of virus transmission in each epidemiologic zone.

States currently exporting wild poliovirus

Pakistan, Cameroon, and the Syrian Arab Republic pose the greatest risk of further wild poliovirus exportations in 2014.

States infected with wild poliovirus but not currently exporting

Afghanistan, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Israel, Somalia and particularly Nigeria, given the international spread from that State historically, pose an ongoing risk for new wild poliovirus exportations in 2014.

Global Public Health Emergency

Based on the Committee’s assessment, the Director General of WHO  on 5 May 2014 declared the international spread of wild poliovirus in 2014 a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).”

Scanning electron photomicrograph of polio virions

poliovirus - PHIL_2446_lores-small
The poliovirus lives in the human pharynx and intestinal tract. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection that involves the gastrointestinal tract and, occasionally, the central nervous system. It is acquired by fecal-oral transmission. Source: CDC

What’s Polio

Polio is a crippling and potentially deadly infectious disease caused by a virus that spreads from person to person invading the brain and spinal cord and causing paralysis. Because polio has no cure, vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and the only way to stop the disease from spreading. The spread of polio has never stopped in Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan. Poliovirus has been reintroduced and continues to spread in Syria, Cameroon and the Horn of Africa after the spread of the virus was previously stopped.

Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global health catastrophe | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

29 U.S. States Report Deadly PED

Posted by feww on April 22, 2014

EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
NIGHTMARE SCENARIO 011
.

PED could seriously threaten U.S. pork production

The highly contagious disease called porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has killed about 5 million U.S. hogs since it was first diagnosed in May 2013 and seriously threatens pork production across the country.

In March, environmental groups urged Gov. McCrory to declare a state of emergency in North Carolina due to a rapidly-spreading viral outbreak that had affected about a third of the state’s 3,000 major hog farms.

About 6,000 separate cases of the virus have been reported in 29 states across the nation. The U.S. has about 68,300 hog farms, according to USDA.

Virus Strain PC21A is a  highly contagious coronavirus that causes porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). It was first reported in the United States in May 2013 in Iowa.  The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has since spread rapidly throughout the U.S., according to reports filed with CDC.

Iowa is the top hog producer state in the U.S., followed by North Carolina.

13-1685-F1
Electron micrograph of a US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) particle detected in a field fecal sample collected during a 2013 outbreak of PED on a farm in Ohio, USA; the fecal sample from which PEDV strain PC21A in this study was detected was from a pig on the same farm during the same outbreak. The sample was negatively stained with 3% phosphotungstic acid. Scale bar = 50 nm. Source: CDC – “Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs”

The most seriously at risk populations are piglets less than 10 days old.

The virus, thriving in cold, wet weather, kills newborn piglets on infected farms until the herd develops immunity after a few weeks, and is affecting about 100 new farms each week. PED causes severe dehydration and loss of appetite and has a nearly 100 percent mortality rate.

Water Quality

“The water-quality watchdogs say they are particularly worried that hog farmers are burying massive numbers of dead animals where they will contaminate groundwater. Also, they say that in some cases dead hogs are left for days, piled in overflowing ‘dead boxes.’ They say the blood and other liquids from those are seeping into groundwater and streams, and that animals feeding on the dead hogs are spreading the virus,” said the report.

The environmentalists have urged the authorities to collect and disseminate more information concerning

  • Numbers of dead hogs
  • Method and of disposal and burial sites of infected carcases
  • Magnitude and extent of threat posed by the epidemic

“Basically we just feel like this is a serious enough problem that the government should be stepping in and getting involved and having direct contact with the facilities that are disposing of these dead hogs,” said Gray Jernigan, a North Carolina-based staff attorney for the Waterkeeper Alliance.

“Since the outbreak began, we’ve certainly seen more hogs sent for disposal and gotten reports of mass burials, and it’s getting to the point where it’s fairly alarming.”

More of this report is posted HERE.

Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED)

New Variant of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus, United States, 2014 (CDC)

Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) was first reported in the United Kingdom in 1971. The disease was characterized by severe enteritis, vomiting, watery diarrhea, dehydration, and a high mortality rate among swine. Subsequently, the causative agent of PED was identified as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), which belongs to the family Coronaviridae and contains an enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome.

PEDV has been reported in many other countries, including Germany, France, Switzerland, Hungary, Italy, China, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam  and was first identified in the United States in May 2013.

By the end of January of 2014, the outbreak had occurred in 23 US states, where 2,692 confirmed cases (www.aasv.org/news/story.php?id = 6989) caused severe economic losses. Recent studies have shown that all PEDV strains in the United States are clustered together in 1 clade within the subgenogroup 2a and are closely related to a strain from China, AH2012 .

In the state of Ohio, the first PED case was identified in June of 2013; since then, thousands of cases have been confirmed by the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory of the Ohio Department of Agriculture. […]

Value of Trade in Swine and Swine Products
In 2011, the United States exported 1.75 billion metric tons of pork and related products worth $5.32 billion (The American Meat Institute, 2013).  Japan and Mexico are the two leading importers of U.S. pork products by value, said USDA.

PED in Japan

The deadly virus has already infected about 250,000 pigs in Japan, killing at least 50,000 of them, as of April 20,2014.

The disease was confirmed in Okinawa last October and has since spread to hundreds of pig farms in 21 prefectures throughout Japan.

Related Links

Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global health catastrophe, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Viral Hog Epidemic Outbreak in NC

Posted by feww on March 1, 2014

EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES
NIGHTMARE SCENARIO 011
.

NC governor urged to declare state of emergency over viral hog epidemic outbreak

Environmental groups have urged Gov. McCrory to declare a state of emergency in North Carolina due to a rapidly-spreading viral outbreak that has affected about a third of North Carolina’s 3,000 major hog farms.

Virus Strain PC21A is a  highly contagious coronavirus that causes porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). It was first reported in the United States in May 2013 in Iowa.  The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has since spread rapidly throughout the U.S., according to reports filed at CDC.

13-1685-F1
Electron micrograph of a US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) particle detected in a field fecal sample collected during a 2013 outbreak of PED on a farm in Ohio, USA; the fecal sample from which PEDV strain PC21A in this study was detected was from a pig on the same farm during the same outbreak. The sample was negatively stained with 3% phosphotungstic acid. Scale bar = 50 nm. Source: CDC – “Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs”

“The Waterkeeper Alliance and the Riverkeepers sent a letter and a public records request Thursday to state Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler, asking him to seek the declaration from McCrory and also release more information on the outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED),” said a report.

The virus, thriving in cold, wet weather, kills newborn piglets on infected farms until the herd develops immunity after a few weeks, and is affecting about 100 new farms each week.

Water Quality

“The water-quality watchdogs say they are particularly worried that hog farmers are burying massive numbers of dead animals where they will contaminate groundwater. Also, they say that in some cases dead hogs are left for days, piled in overflowing ‘dead boxes.’ They say the blood and other liquids from those are seeping into groundwater and streams, and that animals feeding on the dead hogs are spreading the virus,” said the report.

The environmentalists have urged the authorities to collect and disseminate more information concerning

  • Numbers of dead hogs
  • Method and of disposal and burial sites of infected carcases
  • Magnitude and extent of threat posed by the epidemic

“Basically we just feel like this is a serious enough problem that the government should be stepping in and getting involved and having direct contact with the facilities that are disposing of these dead hogs,” said Gray Jernigan, a North Carolina-based staff attorney for the Waterkeeper Alliance.

“Since the outbreak began, we’ve certainly seen more hogs sent for disposal and gotten reports of mass burials, and it’s getting to the point where it’s fairly alarming.”

More of this report is posted HERE.

Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED)

New Variant of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus, United States, 2014 (CDC)

Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) was first reported in the United Kingdom in 1971. The disease was characterized by severe enteritis, vomiting, watery diarrhea, dehydration, and a high mortality rate among swine. Subsequently, the causative agent of PED was identified as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), which belongs to the family Coronaviridae and contains an enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome.

PEDV has been reported in many other countries, including Germany, France, Switzerland, Hungary, Italy, China, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam  and was first identified in the United States in May 2013.

By the end of January of 2014, the outbreak had occurred in 23 US states, where 2,692 confirmed cases (www.aasv.org/news/story.php?id = 6989) caused severe economic losses. Recent studies have shown that all PEDV strains in the United States are clustered together in 1 clade within the subgenogroup 2a and are closely related to a strain from China, AH2012 .

In the state of Ohio, the first PED case was identified in June of 2013; since then, hundreds of cases have been confirmed by the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory of the Ohio Department of Agriculture. […]

Posted in 2014 disaster diary, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, significant events, Virus Strain PC21A | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Global Food Safety Warning: Atypical Scrapie Found in NZ Sheep

Posted by feww on October 28, 2009

SOURCE:

Deadly New Zealand Meat and Farm Produce Enter Nightmare Level

What’s Scrapie?

A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), and related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or “mad cow disease”), scrapie is a fatal, degenerative disease that affects the nervous systems of sheep and goats. Scrapie, like other spongiform encephalopathies, is caused by a prion. So far the deadly disease does not appear to be transmissible to humans, but that could change.

KEEP OFF NEW ZEALAND MEAT AND DAIRY PRODUCTS!

Sheep with scrapie
Sheep with Scrapie. Source: USDA

Related Links:

Posted in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, chronic wasting disease, CJD, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, infectious agents, NZ lamb, NZ meat, prion | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »