Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘Ghost towns’

Fukushima Fatal Farce Turns Deadlier

Posted by feww on September 1, 2013

Radiation levels near Fukushima ’18 times higher’ than reported: TEPCO

Readings taken near a leaking tank at the nuked Fukushima plant on Saturday showed radiation levels were high enough to prove lethal within about 4 hours of exposure, the plant operator said.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) had originally reported the radiation level near the tank was about 100 millisieverts an hour.

Now, the company says the equipment used for the earlier recording could only read up to 100 millisieverts (mSv).

The new reading, using more sensitive Geiger counters, showed levels of about 1,800 mSv per hour.

Studies of the 1945 atomic bombing at Hiroshima and Nagasaki show that 100 percent of victims whose bodies were exposed to 6,000 mSv (600,000 millirems) died from radiation. About 50 percent of victims who received 4,500 mSv (450,000 millirems) of radiation also died.

TEPCO said it had recorded radiation of 230 mSv an hour at a second tank, which was emitting 70 mSv in July. The company said it had also discovered two additional leaks: a third storage tank emitting 70 mSv an hour; and a pipe connecting two other tanks measuring 230 mSv.

The 2011 triple meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi NPP forced more than 160,000 people to abandon their homes, turning dozens of communities into ghost towns.

IMPORTANT NOTICE:
The Internet Mafia has previously censored Public Health Emergency, global health warnings and any and ALL information posted on this blog concerning nuclear disasters, nuclear energy and the global nuclear mafia. The cabal have specifically blocked or buried blog entrees on Fukushima Daiichi NPP.

What is a lethal dose of radiation from a single Exposure?

Studies of the 1945 atomic bombing at Hiroshima and Nagasaki show that 100 percent of victims whose bodies were exposed to 600,000 millirems (6,000 mSv) died from radiation. About 50 percent of victims who received  450,000 millirems (4,500 mSv) of radiation also died.

(Note: Rem is a unit of ionizing radiation equal to the amount that produces the same damage to humans as one roentgen of high-voltage x-rays.  Source: MIT)

1 rem = 10 mSv or 10,000 µSv  (1 Sv = 100 rem)

Background Radiation in microsieverts per year (µSv/yr)

  • Average background radiation (US):  3,000
  • Higher altitudes (e.g, Denver): 4,000

“Safe Levels” of Radiation (U.S.)

Limits above natural background radiation levels (average 3,000 microsieverts per year) and medical radiation:

  • Occupation Limit: Maximum of 50,000 µSv (the limit for a worker using radiation)
  • Average Natural Background: 3,000 µSv

[Note: Lifetime cumulative exposure should be limited to a person’s age multiplied by 10 millirems, e.g., a 70-year-old person, 70,000 millirems.]

Adults

  • Max single dose for an adult: 30,000µSv
  • Annual total dose: 50,000µSv

Under 18

  • Max single dose for a person aged under 18 years: 3,000µSv (whole body equivalent)
  • Annual total exposure: 5,000µSv

Fetal Exposure

  • Maximum limit for fetal exposure during gestation period:  500 µSv per month above background levels

Medical

  • Single Chest X-ray (the whole body equivalent): 20µSv

Air Travel

  • Coast-to-coast US round trip flight: 120µSv

*Note:  Radiation dose of about 2,000 millisieverts (200,000 millirems) cause serious illness.

Half-life of some radioactive elements

[NOTE: Half-life is the time taken for a radioactive substance to decay by half.]

  • Cesium-134 ~ 2  years
  • Cesium-137 ~ 30 years
  • Iodine-131 ~ 8 days
  • Plutonium-239 ~ 24,200 years
  • Ruthenium-103 ~ 39 days [Ruthenium is a fission product of uranium-235.]
  • Ruthenium-106 ~ 374 days
  • Strontium-90 ~ 28.85 years  [Strontium-90 is a product of nuclear fission and is found in large amounts in spent nuclear fuel and in radioactive waste from nuclear reactors.]
  • Uranium-234 ~  246,000 years
  • Uranium-235 ~ 703.8  million years
  • Uranium-238  ~ 4.468 billion years

Probability of a Nuclear Disaster by Country

The following probability figures  calculated by FIRE-EARTH on April 8, 2011 still hold!

  • Japan (880)³
  • United States (865)
  • France (855)
  • Taiwan (850)
  • Belgium, China, Finland, India,  South Korea, United Kingdom, Ukraine, Russia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Armenia, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania,  Hungary, Bulgaria, Spain,  Pakistan, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico,  South Africa, Canada (810)
  • Germany, Sweden, Netherlands (800)
  • Switzerland  (750)

Notes:

  1. The list represents a snapshot of events at the time of calculating the probabilities. Any forecast posted  here is subject to numerous variable factors.
  2. Figures in the bracket represent the probability of an incident occurring out of 1,000; the forecast duration is valid for the next 50  months.
  3. Probability includes a significant worsening of Fukushima nuclear disaster, and future quakes forecast for Japan.
  4. A nuclear incident is defined as a level 5 (Accident With Wider Consequences), or worse, on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). See below.
  5. Safety issues considered in compiling these lists include the age, number of units and capacity of nuclear reactors in each country/state, previous incidents, probability of damage from human-enhanced natural disasters, e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic activity, hurricanes, tornadoes, storms, wildfires, flooding…]
  6. The  Blog’s knowledge concerning the extent to which the factors described in (3) might worsen during the forecast period greatly influences the forecast. (Last UPDATED: June 26, 2011)

Related Links (Latest)

.

The Following Announcements Was Released by TEPCO

News related to TEPCO (Sep 01,2013)
Explanation regarding the high radiation (maximum 1,800 mSv) found at tanks in Fukushima Daiichi NPS on August 31, 2013

We deeply apologize for the great anxiety and inconvenience caused by the recent contaminated water issues at the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, which affects the residents near the power station and the broader society.

Regarding the high radiation (maximum 1,800 mSv) found at tanks in Fukushima Daiichi NPS on August 31, some articles reported that “by simple calculation, if a person is exposed this much radiation amount for four hours continuously, that would lead to death” or “it takes only one minute to reach the annual radiation exposure limit for workers,” etc. We would like to explain more about the 1,800 mSv.

We used measuring equipment that measures both beta radiation and gamma radiation. The 1,800 mSv is the total amount of beta radiation and gamma radiation. Gamma radiation was 1 mSv and most of the 1,800 mSv was beta radiation.

Since 1,800 mSv is approximately 3.5 times higher than the control level of equivalent dose for skin which is 500 mSv/year, we should carefully control radiation exposure. Since beta radiation travels only a short distance, radiation level decreases considerably if we keep a distance. Moreover, since beta radiation is weak and can be blocked by a thin metal sheet such as aluminum, we think that we can control radiation exposure by using proper equipments and cloths.

Additionally, although 1,800 mSv was detected at 5 cm above the floor, the radiation level of 50 cm above the floor was 15 mSv. Thus, 1,800 mSv does not mean the radiation level of the whole nearby place.

Some articles reported that “if a person is exposed this much radiation amount for four hours continuously, that would lead to death” comparing with the radiation level that would result in death (7,000 mSv), or “it takes only one minute to reach the annual radiation exposure limit for workers” comparing with the annual radiation exposure limit for workers (50 mSv). However, we believe that simply comparing the 1,800 mSv with those standard levels is not proper, since the standard levels are accumulation of effective dose (not equivalent dose) that express effects for whole body.

We will find out the cause of this issue and make proper counter measures immediately, and continue to make every effort to secure safety of workers.

Posted in disaster areas, disaster calendar, disaster watch, disaster watch 2013, disaster zone, disasters, environment, fukushima nuclear disaster, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, highest risk of nuclear disasters, nuclear disasters, nuclear energy, nuclear industry, nuclear power mafia | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Record Heatwave Kills Dozens in U.S.

Posted by feww on July 8, 2012

Deadly heat persists in eastern U.S.

At least 46 people have died amid extreme heat that has paralyzed more than two dozen states from the Midwest to the East Coast.

Heat-related fatalities occurred in Virgina (at least 12 deaths reported), Maryland (11), Chicago (10), Wisconsin (4), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (3) Tennessee (2), and Indiana (1), where an infant died after being left in a vehicle in triple-digit temperatures outside her home in Greenfield, about 25 miles east of Indianapolis.

Hundreds of thousands of people in West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, New Jersey, Maryland and Indiana are still without power 9 days after deadly storms swept through the region causing widespread destruction and ‘catastrophic damage’ to power grids.

Map of Temperature Departure from Normal

Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

  • Krasnodar Region, Russia. The worst flooding in living memory in southern Russia’s Krasnodar Region, near the Black Sea, has left at least 153 people dead and and more than 5,000 homes destroyed or damaged, reports said.
    • “The flash flood inundated the cities of Gelendzhik, Krymsk and Novorossiysk as well as the four villages of Divnomorskoe, Nizhnebakanskaya, Neberdzhaevskaya and Kabardinka.”
    • “The streets of Krymsk are now mostly deserted. The town looks like the set of a post-apocalyptic movie,” RT reported .
    • About 3,000 people have been evacuated from flood-hit areas in Krasnoda, as of posting,  while 30,000 people are without power in the region, and more than 80 percent of the population of Krymsk have lost their gas supply cut off.

Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

Up-to-date weekly average CO2 at Mauna Loa

  • Week of June 24, 2012:     395.33 ppm
  • Weekly value from 1 year ago:     393.50 ppm
  • Weekly value from 10 years ago:     375.08 ppm

Recent Mauna Loa CO2

  • June 2012:     395.77 ppm
  • June 2011:     393.68 ppm

Recent Global CO2

  • May 2012:     393.77 ppm
  • May 2011:     391.90 ppm

Links to Recent Related Entries

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in environment, global deluge, Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2012, global drought, Global Food Crisis, Global Food Shortages, global ghg emissions, global health catastrophe, global heating, global precipitation patterns | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Food production drops 40 percent in Mexico due to drought

Posted by feww on March 11, 2012

Mexico’s worst drought in living memory intensifies affecting two-thirds of the states

Extreme drought has affected millions of Mexicans, who lack adequate food.

Disaster Calendar 2012 – March 11

[March 11, 2012]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,466 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • Mexico. The worst recorded drought in Mexico’s history has severely affected millions of people.
    • The state of Guanajuato, a major grower of crops in the country has received little rainfall in the past 18 months.
    • Up to 100,000 heads of livestock have reportedly died and million more are without food.
    • More than 4 million acres of crops have been destroyed.
    • “In some parts of the country this has grown to be a bigger issue than even security,” says Alejandro Aboytes, a farmer in Guanajuato and former president of a local producers group. “It is hardest for those who must rely on the rain to grow food. They cannot grow anything, so it means they don’t eat.”
    • Food production has fallen by 40 percent across Mexico because of the severe drought, said the National Confederation of Peasants.
    • Some half dozen small towns and communities have turned into ghost towns.
    • The drought is expected to intensify.


North American Drought Map – January 31, 2012.

US Seasonal Drought Outlook

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Recent Drought Links

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Obama Bows to Big Business on Killer Smog Control

Posted by feww on September 2, 2011

Surprise, Surprise!!

The kowtow president reverses new rules on limiting deadly smog pollution

New rules to limit killer smog pollution would have cost big business “billions of dollars.”

READ THIS FIRST

Continued hacking and content censorship

In view of the continued hacking and censorship of this blog by the Internet Mafia, the Moderators have decided to maintain only a minimum presence at this site, until further notice.

FIRE-EARTH will continue to update the 2011 Disaster Calendar for the benefit of its readers.

WordPress is HACKING this blog!

WordPress Continues to Hack Fire-Earth, Affiliated Blogs

The Blog Moderators Condemn in the Strongest Possible Terms the Continued Removal of Content and Hacking of FIRE-EARTH and Affiliated Blogs by WordPress!

Disaster Calendar 2011 – September 2

[September 2, 2011]  Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.  SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,657 Days Left to the ‘Worst Day’ in Human History

  • USA. Bowing to big business, the white House has withdrawn the draft Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard.
    • The draft had proposed to limit ground-level ozone to between 60 and 70 parts per billion over eight hours [The previous standard was 75 parts per billion set by the Bush administration in 2008.]
    • “The Obama administration is caving to big polluters at the expense of protecting the air we breathe. This is a huge win for corporate polluters and a huge loss for public health,” said Gene Karpinski, president of the League of Conservation Voters.
      • “It’s good to see the administration recognizing the need to balance environmental rules with the potential impact on consumers and jobs,” said Melissa McHenry, a spokeswoman with American Electric Power.
      • “We would hope that same consideration should be given to other rules that the EPA is moving forward with,” she added.
    • “Smog kills more people than car crashes in the most heavily-polluted areas of the country: There were 2,521 vehicular deaths in the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast Air Basin in 2006, compared to 3,812 deaths attributed to respiratory illness caused by particulate pollution, according to a study by researchers at Cal State Fullerton.” Source

Other Disasters

  • Sudan. Sudan has declared a state of emergency in the state of Blue Nile following a third outbreak of fighting on the country’s  border states with South Sudan, reports said.
    • Since South Sudan’s declaration of independence in July, at least a quarter of a million people have fled their homes, most of them from the South Kordofan state (population: ~ 1.2 million).
  • Connecticut River Valley. Flooding triggered by Tropical Storm Irene have submerged  farmland in the Connecticut River Valley, destroying crops both in Connecticut and Massachusetts and washing away topsoil, a report said.
  • Iowa, USA. The town of Hamburg in  southwest Iowa (pop: 1,100) may soon become a ghost town as many of its residents may leave because of chronic flooding. The summer-long flooding along the Missouri River have limited access to the town since June, a report said.
  • Southern California, USA.  Authorities have ordered the residents of 1,500 homes to evacuate after a wildfire engulfed a large section of I-15, the main interstate between SoCal and Las Vegas, AP reported.
    • The blaze began about1 pm Friday and consumed 500 acres in two hours, the report said.
  • Georgia, USA. Governor of Georgia has requested a disaster designation for 157 of Georgia’s 159 counties because of the ongoing drought and exceptional heat conditions that have plagued the state since April, a report said.
    •  “Earlier this summer, Vilsack [USDA] had granted a disaster designation for 22 counties and an additional 26 counties were declared contiguous disaster areas due to drought and heat conditions. Those counties were all in the southern portion of the state and reflected crop losses early in the year as a result of drought conditions.”
  • Shikoku Island, Japan. Typhoon Talas, the 12th of the season, made landfall on Shikoku Island, killing at least one person with half dozen others missing, and injuring dozens of others, a report said.
    •  Some 3,200 others were forced to evacuate in 16 prefectures in western to central Japan.
    • Typhoon Talas also disrupted air and rail traffic in western Japan, with hundreds of domestic and  international flights cancelled.
    • Mudslides caused by torrential rains blocked roads, isolating hundreds of people in Saijo, Ehime Prefecture, on Shikoku.
    • A record 1,150 millimeters of rain fell in 72 hours over a village in Nara Prefecture.
    • Rain records for at least 4 other prefectures in western Japan have also been broken, reports said.

Related Links

Posted in global disasters | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Ghost Towns Left Behind by Japan’s Deadly Tsunami

Posted by feww on March 12, 2011

A Dozen Towns Have Been Obliterated by Japan’s Megaquake-Spawned Tsunami

Japanese authorities say they have been unable so far to establish contact with local officials in about a dozen towns spanning the NE Honshu area. Some of the towns are believed to have been completely destroyed by the deadly tsunami.

In the small seaside town of Minami Sanriku (Population17,800), located in Miyagi prefecture and now almost completely wiped off the map, the authorities have established the whereabouts of of 7,500 residents who were evacuated; however, the fate of the remaining 10,300 people is unknown.

Related Links:

Posted in environment, japan earthquake, Japan Earthquakes 2011, Japan tsunami, Japan Tsunami Information | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Mt. Kurikoma Coughs, Still Comatose!

Posted by feww on June 18, 2008

The Year of Volcanoes, Too?

Steam, hot volcanic plumes rise near Mt. Kurikoma

Japan’s Self-Defense Forces personnel observed Monday hot volcanic plumes about seven kilometers southwest of the summit of Mt. Kurikoma, a 1,627-meter-high volcano located on the border of Miyagi, Iwate and Akita prefectures, Yomiuri Shimbun reported.

Aerial observation from a helicopter showed plumes rising from several spots near both Hanayama in Kurihara, and Yu no Hama hot-spring spa.

Sadato Ueki of Tohoku University’s Research Center for the Prediction of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions said the plumes might be volcanic gases rising to the surface, or steam coming from underground hot water channels whose course was diverted by the powerful Mw 6.8 quake Saturday. The Iwate quake struck about 22km NW of the Mt. Kurikoma summit.

“There’s a possibility that volcanic gases that had been confined below ground are gushing out through fissures in the mountain created by the earthquake,” he said. However, he ruled out increased volcanic activity on Mt. Kurikoma, because the plumes were very far from the volcano’s summit.

Kurikoma volcano last erupted in 1950.

MT. KURIKOMA is a dormant stratovolcano stretching across three prefectures (states) of Miyagi, Iwate and Akita, standing high at an altitude of 1,627.7m.


Kurikoma volcano seen from the SSE with its summit at the right-center, the satellitic cone of Daichimori on the left, and Higashi-Kurikoma on the right. On the opposite side of the volcano, the summit is cut by a 4-km-wide caldera breached to the north that is partially filled by the Tsurugi-dake central cone, once mined for sulfur. (Caption: Source) Image Copyright: Shingo Takeuchi (Japanese Quaternary Volcanoes database, RIODB, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/index.htm). See FEWW Fair Use Notice!

Coordinates: 38° 57′ 0″ N, 140° 46′ 48″ E
Decimal: 38.95°, 140.78°

Related Links:

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Semeru Volcano: Alert Level III

Posted by feww on May 22, 2008

Mount Semeru Volcano Restive, Alert Level III

May 22, 2008

Jakarta – Indonesian authorities on Thursday urged residents living around the slopes of Mount Semeru in Indonesia’s crowded East Java province to keep their distance from the active volcano, which appears to be heating up.

Vulcanologists upgraded the alert status of Mount Semeru volcano to level three, one level below a full state of alert, after the 3,676-metre-high volcano on Wednesday sent hot lava as much as 3,000 metres down its slopes.

Villagers and farmers were urged ‘not to conduct activity at a radius of 4 kilometres from the crater, especially around the south-east of the volcano’s slopes,’ said Surono, head of Indonesia’s Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation at the directorate general of volcanology.

Surono, who like many Indonesians goes only by one name, appealed to residents living on the riverbanks along three different rivers to be cautious of threats posed by lava streams.

However, no immediate evacuation is being considered for residents living in a number villages in the potential danger zone, he said, adding that a team of experts is intensively monitoring Mount Semeru’s activity round-the-clock.

The Mount Semeru volcano, 780 kilometres east of Jakarta, is a popular tourist destination, especially for hikers. Semeru is one of Indonesia’s most active volcanoes.

The Indonesian archipelago, straddling the seismically active ‘Ring of Fire,’ has the world’s highest density of volcanoes. Of its 500 volcanoes, 128 are active and 65 are listed as dangerous. (Source) Copyright respective author or news agency.

semeru_eruption_east_java
The climb to the summit of Semeru is a 2-3 day walk. The mountain stages minor eruptions (like in the photograph) every 20 – 40 minutes. The photo was taken in late afternoon (August 2003) and simply involved walking from the campsite at the base of the climb to the summit around to the west so that the sun was at my back, then waiting for the eruption to start. The most striking aspect of the photo is the colour caused by the almost perpendicular rays of the sun hitting the cloud of dust and steam escaping a couple of thousand metres into the sky from the crater. The photo typifies the fact that Indonesia sits in the middle of the “Ring of Fire”. The many spectacles presented by the landscapes, the festivals and the people of Indonesia never cease to truly amaze me. Photo and caption credit: Campbell Bridge (via Trek Earth at:http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Asia/Indonesia/photo109462.htm)

Semeru: The Most Active Volcano of Java

Semeru also Gunung Semeru is the highest and one of most active volcanoes of Java. Known also as Mahameru (Great Mountain), it is very steep and rises abruptly above the coastal plains of eastern Java. Maars containing crater lakes have formed along a line through the summit. Semeru lies at the south end of the Tengger Volcanic Complex. The steep-sided volcano, also referred to as Mahameru (Great Mountain), rises abruptly to 3676 m above coastal plains to the south. Semeru’s eruptive history is extensive. Since 1818, at least 55 eruptions have been recorded (10 of which resulted in fatalities) consisting of both lava flows and pyroclastic flows. More than 500 people have been killed by Semeru’s eruptions during the last 30 years. Semeru has been in almost continuous eruption since 1967. (Source 1 and 2 )


Semeru is one of many volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Graphic courtesy of Darwin VAAC.


Semeru, a stratovolcano, has erupted at least 55 times since 1818. The eruptions are commonly moderate to moderately large (VEI of 2 to 3) and explosive. This photo, taken November 4, 1982, shows a small cloud associated with a Strombolian eruption (relatively low-level volcanic eruptions) . Photo by Jack Lockwood, U.S. Geological Survey. (Source)


Strombolian eruptions are relatively low-level volcanic eruptions, named after the Italian volcano named Stromboli, where such eruptions consist of ejection of incandescent cinder, lapilli and lava bombs to altitudes of tens to hundreds of meters. They are small to medium in volume, with sporadic violence. (Source). Credit: Wolfgang Beyer GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.

Semeru eruptions are commonly moderate to moderately large (VEI of 2 to 3). Some of the eruptions produced lahars (a type of mudflow composed of pyroclastic material and water that flows down from a volcano). Semeru’s most recent eruption began in 1967 and has continued to the present. In August of 1994, explosions occurred at 15-20 minute intervals. In February of 1995, pyroclastic avalanches traveled about 0.6 mile (1 km) from the summit.


Semeru, 1985. A USGS Photo.

Related News:

Related Links:

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

Posted by feww on May 19, 2008

UPDATE: Latest From TAAL and other Philippines Volcanoes

Taal May Erupt at Anytime

FEWW team believes there is a strong probability that the Taal Volcano, a Pelean-type active volcano on the island of Luzon, might erupt this month. Taal volcano is designated as one of the 16 Decade Volcanoes by International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI). Located about 50 km south of the capital, Manila, Taal is surrounded by populated areas.

Taal has erupted violently several times (the last eruption was in 1977). The current death toll caused by its activities stands at about 6,000.

More seismic activities in the region should be expected.


Taal Volcano Seen through Lake Taal (Photo: Jhun Taboga)


A cinder cone in an acidic lake on Taal Volcano (Credit: JG Moore of the US Geological Survey)


Major volcanoes of the Philippines

Pacific Ring of Fire


The Pacific Ring of Fire is an area of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions encircling the basin of the Pacific Ocean. The Ring of Fire has 452 volcanoes and is home to over 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes. Ninety percent of the world’s earthquakes and 80% of the world’s largest earthquakes occur along the Ring of Fire. The Ring of Fire is a direct result and consequence of plate tectonics and the movement and collisions of crustal plates. (Source)

Plate Tectonics


World’s 14 major tectonic plates plus the Scotia plate. Mapped in the second half of the 20th century to explain the observed evidence for large scale motions of the Earth’s lithosphere. The lithosphere is broken up into tectonic plates. The surface of the Earth consists of a further 38 [40] minor plates.

The largest of the major plates are

  • African Plate, containing Africa – Continental plate
  • Antarctic Plate, containing Antarctica – Continental plate
  • Australian Plate, containing Australia (fused with Indian Plate about 50 million years ago) – Continental plate
  • Eurasian Plate containing Asia and Europe – Continental plate
  • North American Plate containing North America and north-east Siberia – Continental plate
  • South American Plate containing South America – Continental plate
  • Pacific Plate, covering the Pacific Ocean – Oceanic plate

See also

Earthquakes, volcanic activity, mountain-building, and oceanic trench formation occur along plate boundaries. The lateral movement of the plates is typically at speeds of 5 – 10 cm/yr. (Read more …)

Recent Earthquakes [Kurile through Kermadec trenches]

[Time at epicenter]

  • Magnitude 4.8; Depth of 48.7 km; SOUTHEAST OF THE LOYALTY ISLANDS; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 10:03:52 PM
  • Magnitude 5.6; Depth of 35 km; SOUTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA; May 18, 2008 at 07:17:24 PM
  • Magnitude 4.6; Depth of 74.1km; MINDORO, PHILIPPINES; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 07:24:17 PM
  • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 10 km; SABAH, MALAYSIA; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 02:26:41 PM
  • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 31.3 km; NIAS REGION, INDONESIA; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 09:59:59 AM
  • Magnitude 4.4; Depth of 242.4 km;KYUSHU, JAPAN; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 07:15:06 AM
  • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 127.1 km, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES, Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 10:17:30 PM
  • Magnitude 5.1; Depth of 151.2 km; SOUTH OF THE KERMADEC ISLANDS; Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 02:23:17 PM
  • Magnitude 5.3; Depth of 150.4 km; NEW BRITAIN REGION, PAPUA NEW GUINEA; Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 03:35:14 AM
  • Magnitude 5.4; Depth of 35 km; SOUTH OF THE KERMADEC ISLANDS; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 11:06:51 PM
  • Magnitude 5.3; Depth of 41 km; SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS REGION; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 09:19:07 AM
  • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 606.3 km; FIJI REGION; Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 10:46:02 AM
  • Magnitude 5.1; Depth of 35 km; TONGA; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 03:06:15 AM
  • Magnitude 5.0; Depth of 25.8 km; KURIL ISLANDS; Wednesday, May 14, 2008 at 08:20:43 AM
  • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 52.5 km; LUZON, PHILIPPINES; Wednesday, May 14, 2008 at 05:48:32 AM
  • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 40.8 km; LUZON, PHILIPPINES; Depth of 40.8 km; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 10:14:30 PM
  • Magnitude 5.4; Depth of 35 km; NORTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 05:29:19 PM
  • Magnitude 5.0; Depth of 36.7 km; TAIWAN REGION; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 06:57:46 AM
  • Magnitude 4.6; Depth of 509 km; SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS; Monday, May 12, 2008 at 04:34:05 AM

[Source: USGS]

Global earthquake epicentres, 1963–1998 (Image: NASA)

Philippines Other Major Volcanoes: Mayon Volcano


Mayon Volcano as viewed from Lingñon Hill in Daraga, Albay. Mayon, located between the Eurasian and the Philippine Plate, is a convergent plate boundary. It is the most active volcano in the Philippines, having erupted over 47 times in the past 400 years. Last eruption: 2006. (Copyrigh by Tam3rd via Wikimedia)

Canlaon Volcano


Canlaon, a stratovolcano, is located in the north central part of the island of Negros.
Last eruption: 2006.

Weather clouds drape the sparsely vegetated summit of Kanlaon volcano (also spelled Canlaon). Kanlaon is the most active of the central Philippines and forms the highest point on the island of Negros. The massive 2435-m-high stratovolcano is dotted with fissure-controlled pyroclastic cones and craters, many of which are filled by lakes. Historical eruptions, recorded since 1866, have typically consisted of phreatic explosions of small-to-moderate size that produce minor ashfalls near the volcano. Photo courtesy of PHIVOLCS. Caption GVP

Ragang volcano


Ragang volcano (above and to the right of the center of image) is located in central Mindanao. Last eruption: 1916. Thanks mainly to the Filipino government and its education authorities, no other image of Ragnag Volcano could be found at the time of writing. NASA Space Shuttle image STS61A-40-71, 1985 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).

There are 22 active volcanoes in the Philippines: Babuyan Claro, Banahaw, Bulusan, Mount Biliran, Bud Dajo, Cagua, Camiguin de Babuyanes, Didicas, Hibok-Hibok, Iraya, Mount Iriga, Mount Kanlaon, Leonard Kniaseff, Makaturing, Matutum, Mayon, Musuan, Mount Parker (Cotabato), Pinatubo, Ragang, Smith Volcano, Taal.

See also: List of volcanoes in the Philippines

Related Links:

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments »

Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

Posted by feww on May 18, 2008

Page Updated:

Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

Posted in environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Tropical storm Halong pounds northern Philippines

Posted by feww on May 18, 2008

Halong triggers floods and landslides

Tropical storm Halong lashes northern Philippines with 95 km per hour winds on Sunday, triggering floods and landslides.


Rescuers are seen pushing their jeep through a street submerged by floodwaters in Iloilo City, central Philippines, on May 15. Tropical storm Halong battered the northern Philippines on Sunday with powerful winds triggering floods and landslides and displacing about 6,000 people, relief officials said.
(AFP/File/Tara Yap)
Image may be subject to copyright. See FEWW Fair Use Notice!

Large areas of the northwestern coast of Luzon, the main Philippine island, experienced a blackout while about 6,000 people were displaced. Residents of low-lying areas and those living near mountain slopes throughout Luzon were urged to “take all the necessary precautions against possible flashfloods and landslides,” as the storm was intensifying the seasonal southwest monsoon winds. (Source)

Related Links:

Posted in acidic lake, Asia, environment, food, health, Lake Taal | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Power of Chaitén Volcano

Posted by feww on May 15, 2008

*** Breaking News: May 19, 2008 Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

NASA Satellite Photos: The Power of Chaitén Volcano


Images taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite.

Related Links:

Posted in Climate Change, energy, environment, food, Global Warming, health, new zealand | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »