Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘human-induced climate change’

Antarctica Hit by Crazy Record High Temperature at 17.5°C (63.5°F)

Posted by feww on March 1, 2017

Temperature Extreme of 17.5°C Recorded in Antarctic Continent

Researchers at World Meteorological Organization (WMO) have announced new records for the highest temperatures recorded in the Antarctic Region.

A record high temperature 17.5°C (63.5°F) was recorded at Experanza base, an Argentine  research base near the northern tip of the Antarctic peninsula. The temperature extreme was recorded on March 24, 2015, WMO reported after reviewing data around Antarctica as part of its “continuing efforts to expand a database of extreme weather and climate conditions throughout the world.”

The highest temperature for the “Antarctica Region” (defined by the WMO and United Nations as all land and ice south of 60°S) of 19.8 degrees Celsius (67.6 degrees Fahrenheit) was observed on 30 January 1982 at Signy Research Station, Borge Bay on Signy Island. 

The highest temperature for the “Antarctic continent” defined as the main continental landmass and adjoining islands is the temperature extreme of 17.5°C (63.5°F) recorded on 24 March 2015 at the Argentine Research Base Esperanza located near the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. 

Thirdly, the highest temperature for the Antarctic Plateau [at or above 2500 meters (8202 feet)] was the observation of -7.0°C (19.4°F) made on 28 December 1980 at an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) site D-80 located inland of the Adélie Coast. 

The lowest temperature yet recorded by ground measurements for the Antarctic Region, and for the whole world, was −89.2°C (-128.6°F) at Vostok station on 21 July 1983.

Antarctica in 6 Seconds

  • Area: 14 million km2 (about twice the size of Australia)
  • Climate: Cold, windy and dry.
  • Average annual temperature:  Ranges from about −10°C on the Antarctic coast to −60°C at the highest parts of the interior.
  • Ice sheet:  Up to 4.8km thick, contains 90% of the world’s fresh water.

The Antarctic Peninsula (the northwest tip near to South America) is among the fastest warming regions of the planet, almost 3°C over the last 50 years. Some 87% of glaciers along the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have retreated in the last 50 years with most of these showing an accelerated retreat in the last 12 years.

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Australia Approves Great Barrier Reef Dredge Dumping

Posted by feww on January 31, 2014

CRIMES AGAINST NATURE
.

Australian company to dump 3 million tons of sand and mud in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

Australian authorities approved a project on Friday to dump dredged sediment in the Great Barrier Reef marine park to create world’s biggest coal [dirty] port.

The decision which was made by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) follows the government approval last year for the coal terminal at Abbot Point port to be expanded.

The primary role of GBRMPA, believe it or not, is to protect the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef Marine Park!

Some 233 scientists and conservationists had earlier signed a letter urging GBRMPA to reject the dumping plan.

“The permit allows North Queensland Bulk Ports Corp to dump [3 million tons of] dredged material in the reef marine park to deepen Abbot Point for two terminals planned by Adani Enterprises and GVK-Hancock, which have long term plans to export 120 million tonnes a year of coal all together,” reported Reuters.

Abbot Point is Australia’s most northerly deepwater coal port located south of Townsville about 25km north of Bowen on the Queensland coast.

The approved disposal site is located approximately 25 km  ENE of Abbot Point port, said GBRMPA.

The port hosts some 200 vessels with maximum cargo tonnage of about 16 million tons
each year, as of 2012.

The Great Barrier Reef – World Heritage Area

The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef structure composed of nearly 3,000 individual reefs extending over 2,600 km (1,680 miles). The GBR spreads over an area of about 345,000 km (133,000 sq mi) in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

The Great Barrier Reef received world heritage status in 1981, the first coral reef ecosystem in the world to achieve the distinction.

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Between Hell and High Water

Posted by feww on July 31, 2010

A Most Disturbing Image of the Day

Study this image carefully, and you could/should see yourself and your family in there!

Fighting [sic] Climate Change anyone Right now, the floods are taking their toll in Pakistan. Next, they could hit YOUR hometown.

Original Caption: Pakistani residents stand by flood water that entered a residential area of Muzaffarabad. The death toll from flash floods and landslides triggered by torrential monsoon rains in Pakistan rose to more than 400 as officials reported thousands more displaced. (Xinhua/AFP Photo). Image may be subject to copyright. See Fair Use Notice.

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Posted in Between Hell and High Water, climate change fallout, climate change hazards, Climate Chaos, Climate Forcings, climate refugees, Climate-related Disasters | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Bangladesh Town Threatened by Flooded River

Posted by feww on July 13, 2009

Image of the Day: Bangladesh Town Threatened by Flooding

sirajganj town
Sirajganj town is under threat of flooding after parts of its flood protection embankment on the Jamuna River at Sashanghat collapsed. Heavy rain and swollen river raised the threat against The Jamuna bridge, and a vast stretch of Sirajganj town’s flood barrier. Photo: The Daily Star. Image may be subject to copyright.

“Hundreds of people including soldiers and police were struggling to stop a town being washed away by the choppy Jamuna river in Bangladesh over the last two days, officials said Saturday.

“Boulders, concrete blocks, brick slabs and sand bags were being dropped by volunteers, government staff and troops along a partially eroded river bank at Sirajganj district town 160 km (100 miles) northwest of the capital Dhaka.” Reuters reported.

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US Impacts of Global Climate Change

Posted by feww on June 17, 2009

Global Climate Change: Impacts in the United States

According to a new report titled Global Climate Change: Impacts in the United States, impacts of climate change are “visible”  in the United States. The report says, “the choices we make now will determine the severity of its impacts in the future…” The  new federal report assesses the  current domestic impacts of climate change and forecasts some of the future trends.

“This new report integrates the most up-to-date scientific findings into a comprehensive picture of the ongoing as well as expected future impacts of heat-trapping pollution on the climate experienced by Americans, region by region and sector by sector,” said John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. “It tells us why remedial action is needed sooner rather than later, as well as showing why that action must include both global emissions reductions to reduce the extent of climate change and local adaptation measures to reduce the damage from the changes that are no longer avoidable.”

“Human induced climate change is a reality, not only in remote polar regions (and) in small tropical islands, but every place around the country — in our own backyards.” Said Jane Lubchenco, the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, as she released the report.

The report is available online

View the powerpoint presentation [The White House Blog]

Key Findings

1. Global warming is unequivocal and primarily human-induced.
Global temperature has increased over the past 50 years. This observed increase is due primarily to human-induced emissions of heat-trapping gases. (p. 13)

2. Climate changes are underway in the United States and are projected to grow.
Climate-related changes are already observed in the United States and its coastal waters. These include increases in heavy downpours, rising temperature and sea level, rapidly retreating glaciers, thawing permafrost, lengthening growing seasons, lengthening ice-free seasons in the ocean and on lakes and rivers, earlier snowmelt, and alterations in river flows. These changes are projected to grow. (p. 27)

3. Widespread climate-related impacts are occurring now and are expected to increase.
Climate changes are already affecting water, energy, transportation, agriculture, ecosystems, and health. These impacts are different from region to region and will grow under projected climate change. (p. 41-106, 107-152)

4. Climate change will stress water resources.
Water is an issue in every region, but the nature of the potential impacts varies. Drought, related to reduced precipitation, increased evaporation, and increased water loss from plants, is an important issue in many regions, especially in the West. Floods and water quality problems are likely to be amplified by climate change in most regions. Declines in mountain snowpack are important in the West and Alaska where snowpack provides vital natural water storage. (p. 41, 129, 135, 139)

5. Crop and livestock production will be increasingly challenged.
Agriculture is considered one of the sectors most adaptable to changes in climate. However, increased heat, pests, water stress, diseases, and weather extremes will pose adaptation challenges for crop and livestock production. (p. 71)

6. Coastal areas are at increasing risk from sea-level rise and storm surge.
Sea-level rise and storm surge place many U.S. coastal areas at increasing risk of erosion and flooding, especially along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, Pacific Islands, and parts of Alaska. Energy and transportation infrastructure and other property in coastal areas are very likely to be adversely affected. (p. 111, 139, 145, 149)

7. Threats to human health will increase.
Health impacts of climate change are related to heat stress, waterborne diseases, poor air quality, extreme weather events, and diseases transmitted by insects and rodents. Robust public health infrastructure can reduce the potential for negative impacts. (p. 89)

8. Climate change will interact with many social and environmental stresses.
Climate change will combine with pollution, population growth, overuse of resources, urbanization, and other social, economic, and environmental stresses to create larger impacts than from any of these factors alone. (p. 99)

9. Thresholds will be crossed, leading to large changes in climate and ecosystems.
There are a variety of thresholds in the climate system and ecosystems. These thresholds determine, for example, the presence of sea ice and permafrost, and the survival of species, from fish to insect pests, with implications for society. With further climate change, the crossing of additional thresholds is expected. (p. 76, 82, 115, 137, 142)

10. Future climate change and its impacts depend on choices made today.
The amount and rate of future climate change depend primarily on current and future human-caused emissions of heat-trapping gases and airborne particles. Responses involve reducing emissions to limit future warming, and adapting to the changes that are unavoidable. (p. 25, 29)

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