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Posts Tagged ‘Kirishima’

Indonesia’s Soputan Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on July 3, 2011

Mount Soputan, one of Sulawesi island’s most active volcanoes, erupted again on Sunday

North Sulawesi’s Soputan volcano erupted on Sunday at about 6:00 am local time, ejecting a column of volcanic gases about 6km into the air.

However, no evacuation order was issued as the volcano did not pose an immediate danger, officials said.

“They nearest residents live some eight kilometers from the mountain and so evacuation is not yet necessary [since the current evacuation zone was set at a 6km radius around the volcano, a forested area that is uninhabited,]” spokesman of the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said.

“Last night, at around 11 pm, the mountain entered its eruption phase,” he said.

Mt Soputan is located about 2,160 km (1,340 miles) northeast of Indonesian capital Jakarta. The volcano  had previously erupted in 2008.


Soputan volcano spews thick smoke and heat clouds in Minahasa on October 7, 2008. Source: AFP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesia, which sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire, is home to 150 listed volcanoes, some 109 to 130 of which are regarded as active, according to various sources.


A Map of Listed Volcanoes of Indonesia.

Summary of Volcano Details

Country: Indonesia
Region Name: Sulawesi Island
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 2008
Summit Elevation: 1,784 m    
Location
:     1.108°N, 124.73°E

Soputan on a restful day!


The small Soputan stratovolcano, seen here from the west, was constructed on the southern rim of the Quaternary Tondano caldera in northern Sulawesi Island. The youthful, largely unvegetated Soputan volcano is one of Sulawesi’s most active volcanoes. During historical time the locus of eruptions has included both the summit crater and Aeseput, a prominent NE flank vent that formed in 1906 and was the source of intermittent major lava flows until 1924. Photo (undated) by Agus Solihin (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Image and caption: GVP.

Pacific Ring of Fire

The Pacific Ring of Fire is an area of frequent siesmic activity and volcanic eruptions caused by plate tectonic movements. Encircling the basin of the Pacific Ocean, which contains oceanic trenches, volcanic arcs, and volcanic belts, the 40,000 km Ring of Fire is home to 452 volcanoes. About ninety percent of the world’s earthquakes including 80% of the world’s major earthquakes occur along the Pacific Ring of Fire.


Volcanic arcs and oceanic trenches partly encircling the Pacific Basin form the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, a zone of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The trenches are shown in blue-green. The volcanic island arcs, although not labeled, are parallel to, and always landward of, the trenches. For example, the island arc associated with the Aleutian Trench is represented by the long chain of volcanoes that make up the Aleutian Islands. (Source: USGS.)

Other Volcanic Activity/ Unrest

[Source: Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report for June 22 – 28]

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Mount Aso Explodes

Posted by feww on May 18, 2011

Japan’s Largest Active Volcano Erupts

Mount Aso exploded on Tuesday May 17 at 19:09UTC, prompting Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) to raise the volcanic alert level for the volcano to 2.

Officials in Kumamoto Prefecture, home to the volcano, have imposed a 1 km exclusion zone around the 1,060m high Mt Naka, also warning of ejecta hazards, Kyodo news agency reported.

The central cone group of Aso hosts five peaks: Eboshi, Kishima, Naka, Neko, and Taka.

The explosive eruption followed minor activity  at the volcano on Friday and a small eruption on Sunday.

Another small  eruption on Monday resulted in a column of smoke and ash ejected 500m above the summit at about 10:am local time.


Mount Aso’s Naka dake volcano in Aso Kujū National Park, Kumamoto Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan, 17 Aug 2009.  Credit:  Igorberger

Current Volcanic Warnings (Japan, Island of Kyushu)


Asosan’s Mt Naka is at warning level 2:  Do not approach the crater. Mt Kirishima and Mt Sakurajima are currently at warning level 3: Do not approach the volcano  Source: JMA (copyrighted, for educational use only.)

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Mount St. Helens: “The Ides of March?”

Posted by feww on February 17, 2011

VolcanoWatch Weekly [17 Feb 2011]

Shinmoedake Update:

Some 2,500 people living near Shinmoedake volcano on Japan’s Kyushu island were advised earlier today to evacuate their homes after heavy rain threatened lahar avalanches, reports say.

VoW: Mount St. Helens


Mount St. Helens and Spirit Lake, as seen from Bear Cove. Image Source: U.S. Forest Service via USGS/CVO.


Phreatic eruption of Mount St. Helens, March 28, 1980, as seen from the north. Image by C.Dan Miller, USGS/CVO

Mount St. Helens, Washington  Ash Plume Path May 18, 1980


Click image to enlarge.

Mount St. Helens Volcano
Position: 46°12′ N 122°10’48” W,
Summit Elevation: 2,549 m (8,363 ft )
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN
Source: USGS/CVO

Recent observations:

An M4.3 earthquake struck the Mount St. Helens region this morning, 14 February 2011, at 10:35 a.m. PST (18:35 UTC) and was felt widely through southwestern Washington and Northwestern Oregon (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/events/uw/02141835/us/index.html). Its exact magnitude may change by a few tenths from this value as records are further analyzed. The earthquake was followed by several aftershocks up to M2.8 over the next few hours (http://www.pnsn.org/recenteqs/latest.htm), the three largest of which were also reported felt. All of the earthquakes are located in an area about 8 kilometers (5 miles) north of the crater of Mount St. Helens, near the Johnston Ridge Observatory, at a depth of about 4 to 6 kilometers (2.5 to 4 miles).

Today’s earthquakes are in the same place as a small swarm that took place about two weeks earlier, on 29 January. These earthquakes are reminiscent of a swarm that took place about 30 years ago, when a swarm of small earthquakes began in August 1980, a few miles northwest of today’s activity. The 1980-1981 sequence climaxed with an M5.5 earthquake on 14 February 1981. Analysis of the 1981 events suggested that they occurred along existing faults in the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, a northwest to southeast trending system of faults in which Mount St. Helens lies. The Mount St. Helens seismic zone exhibits strike-slip motion, with the southwestern rocks slipping horizontally northwest relative to the rocks northeast of the fault zone. The fault zone likely exerts control on the location of Mount St. Helens volcano. Studies following the 1980 eruption suggested that the magma removed during the May 1980 eruption and subsequent lava-dome building caused faults along the seismic zone to slip in response to the magma withdrawal. Similar interaction of volcanic activity and tectonic fault movement is possible in the case of today’s earthquakes, but at present there appears to be no signs of unrest in the volcanic system.  USGS/Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Washington

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report – 9 February to 15 February 2011

[Source: SI/USGS]

New Activity/Unrest:

Map of Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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VolcanoWatch Weekly [10 Feb 2011]

Posted by feww on February 10, 2011

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report – 2 February to 8 February 2011

[Source: SI/USGS]

Recent Activity at Kizimen Volcano


Kizimen Volcano
blows out a plume of ash, smoke and steam over the  Gulf of Kamchatka on February 1, 2011.  Kizimen recent eruptions are said to be both explosive and effusive. This natural-color image was taken by the MODIS aboard the Aqua satellite. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.


Kizimen Volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula (elev. 2,376m, or 7,795 ft),  ejected a plume of ash, steam and volcanic gasses on January 6, 2011, when
ALI on NASA’s EO-1 satellite captured this natural-color image.  Kizimen had released continuous ash emissions since December 31, 2010, KVERT reported. Kizimen erupted explosively 83 years ago. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.


Eruption of Kizimen volcano on January 26, 2011. Photo by P. Shpilenok. http://shpilenok.livejournal.com/44922.html (Image may be subject to copyright.)

New Activity/Unrest:

Map of Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

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