Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘Kurile Islands’

Pavlof Eruption Intensifies

Posted by feww on June 26, 2013

Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano ejects a plume 28,000 feet asl

Pavlof is erupting vigorously, exhibiting strongest seismic activity detected so far this year, characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent explosions suggesting lava fountaining and ash production, Alaska Volcanoes Observatory (AVO) reported.

The wave of intense activity started late on Monday and continued into Tuesday, with trace ash fall reported in the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano.

AVO Daily Update  – Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 12:33 PM AKDT (Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 20:33 UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code:   ORANGE
In its daily briefing AVO said:

Vigorous eruptive activity indicated by a distinct increase in seismicity beginning around 6:50 UTC (22:50 AKDT) last evening is continuing. The level of seismicity for the past 11-12 hours has been the strongest seismic activity detected so far during the 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The seismicity is characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent small explosions that are likely associated with lava fountaining and ash production.

  • A distinct plume extending to the west of the volcano rising as high 28,000 feet above sea level (a.s.l.) according to Satellite data and pilot reports.
  • Satellite imagery also show strong thermal signals at the volcano summit.
  • AVO received a report of trace ash fall on the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano on June 25, 2013.

pavlof 7jun2013
Pavlof volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay on June 7, 2013. Photo credit: Robert Sigurdson, via AVO.

At this level of unrest it is likely that lava fountaining and ash emission are occurring. Lava fountaining is likely producing spatter-fed lava flows that are descending the flanks of the volcano over ice and snow and could be producing substantial steam plumes. These plumes probably contain variable amounts of ash. At the level of unrest observed over the past 11-12 hours, the volcanic plume has not been particularly ash rich; however, this could change if the character of the eruption changes and it remains possible for more robust ash plumes to be generated at any time. AVO is monitoring the eruption closely and will issue further information as it becomes available.

Mount Pavlof, one of the most active volcanoes in the U.S.,  has been erupting since May 13, spewing ash and lava at a low intensity.


Index map showing the location of Pavlof and other Quaternary volcanoes on the Alaskan peninsula. Volcano(es): Alagogshak, Amak, Aniakchak, Basalt of Gertrude Creek, Black Peak, Chiginagak, Cone 3110, Cone 3601, Dana, Denison, Devils Desk, Douglas, Dutton, Fourpeaked, Frosty, Griggs, Iron Trig cone, Kaguyak, Katmai, Kejulik, Kialagvik, Knob 1000, Kukak, Kupreanof, Mageik, Martin, Novarupta, Pavlof, Pavlof Sister, Rainbow River cone, Steller, Stepovak Bay 1, Stepovak Bay 2, Stepovak Bay 3, Stepovak Bay 4, Trident, Ugashik-Peulik, Unnamed (near Ukinrek Maars), Veniaminof, Yantarni. Credit Janet Schaefer/AVO

Veniaminof Volcano Activity [Source: AVO]

Continued volcanic tremors  suggest that the Veniaminof Volcano is still erupting, said AVO. Recent satellite images  show elevated surface temperatures at the intracaldera cone; webcam images from Perryville show a light-colored plume rising above the rim of the intracaldera cone, some 8,200 feet a.s.l.

It is possible for activity at Veniaminof Volcano to increase above its current level at any time and more vigorous ash emissions may result. Sustained periods of volcanic tremor may correspond with continuous ash emission which may not be detected in satellite data, especially if ash plumes remain below 15,000 to 20,000 feet above sea level. Brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions with ash fall limited to areas on the flanks of the volcano are likely to occur while the volcano is at its current level of unrest. A larger explosive episode and associated ash emission is not expected at the current level of unrest; however, this remains possible and would be evident in seismic and satellite data.

Current Volcanic Activity [as of June 26, 2013]

Alaska 

Cleveland YELLOW ADVISORY
Pavlof  ORANGE  WATCH
Veniaminof ORANGE  WATCH

Kamchatka Peninsula

Gorely YELLOW
Karymsky ORANGE
Kizimen ORANGE
Tolbachik ORANGE
Bezymianny YELLOW
Sheveluch ORANGE

Kurile Islands

Chirinkotan YELLOW

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How Many Volcanoes Firing?

Posted by feww on March 7, 2013

Global Volcanic Eruptions 2013: Tempo Rising?


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W; CAVW #1101-24-) – [Group A on the Global Map]
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 12:14 PM AKST (Wednesday, March 6, 2013 21:14 UTC)
Summit Elevation: 5676 ft (1,730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Source: AVO

1338849660_ak52
Cleveland viewed from an Alaska Airlines 737 en route to Adak, Alaska. [Carlisle Volcano, center of image. Mount Cleveland, lower right of image.]

Date: May 31, 2012 12:00 AM
Photographer/Creator: Read, Cyrus. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.

1285607433_ak52
This GeoEye IKONOS image shows a faint plume issuing from Cleveland Volcano at 2:31 PM on September 14, 2010. Red in this image highlights areas of vegetation detected by the near-infrared channel
.

Date: September 14, 2010 10:31 PM UTC
Volcano(es): Cleveland
Photographer/Creator: Wessels, Rick
Image processed by AVO/USGS. Image copyright 2010 – GeoEye

KILAUEA VOLCANO (19°25’16” N 155°17’13” W; CAVW #1302-01-)
Wednesday, March 6, 2013 7:43 AM HST (Wednesday, March 6, 2013 17:43 UTC)
Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1,247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Source: HVO

Kamchatka Volcanoes on ORANGE Alert [Group J on the Global Map]

  • PLOSKY TOLBACHIK VOLCANO (55.83 N, 160.39 E; CAVW #1000-24-)
    Elevation:  3,085 m (10119 ft )
  • SHEVELUCH VOLCANO (56.64 N, 161.32 E; CAVW #1000-27-)
    Elevation: 3, 283 m [the dome elevation: 2,500 m)
  • KIZIMEN VOLCANO (55.13 N, 160.32 E; CAVW #1000-23-)
    Elevation: 2,485 m (8151 ft)
  • KARYMSKY VOLCANO (54.05 N, 159.44 E; CAVW #1000-13-)
    Elevation 1,486 m (4874 ft)

Other Kamchatka Volcanoes on YELLOW Alert [Group J on the Global Map]

  • KLYUCHEVSKOY VOLCANO (56.06 N, 160.64 E; CAVW #1000-26-)
    Elevation:  4,750 m
  • BEZYMIANNY VOLCANO (55.97 N, 160.6 E; CAVW #1000-25-)
    Elevation: 2,882 m
  • GORELY VOLCANO (52.56 N, 158.03 E; CAVW #1000-07-)
    Elevation: 1,828 m

Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands

  • Snow (Chirpoi Is.)  – YELLOW
  • Ivan Grozny – YELLOW

Recent Activity/ Unrest at other volcanoes

Ongoing Activity

Volcano/Earthquake Links

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic event, volcanic hazard, volcanic unrest, volcano, volcano alert, volcano images, Volcano News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

36 of Kuriles’ 68 Volcanic Centers Active Recently!

Posted by feww on July 26, 2008

KURILE ISLAND VOLCANOES AND THE THREAT TO AVIATION

The remote Kurile Islands of the northwest Pacific stretch 1250 km (740 mi) from the tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula to northern Hokkaido, Japan. The Kuriles include 68 identified volcanic centers above sea level. Among them, 36 have been active in recent times and many are capable of producing sudden ash clouds that rise more than 15 km (50,000 ft) above sea level.

Some of the world’s most heavily traveled air corridors pass within a few hundred km of Kurile volcanoes. Daily, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 people fly on these routes. Ash clouds can rise more than 1 km (3,300 ft) per minute, putting dozens of en route wide-body jets rapidly in harm’s way on a typical day in the North Pacific. Ash clouds travel with prevailing winds across hundreds or thousands of kilometers of airspace within a day. Inadvertent entry into an ash cloud can severely damage aircraft systems and, in the worst case, lead to complete engine failure. Ash fallout can also curtail ground operations at airports. (

(Excerpts and Image: KURILE VOLCANOES AND THE SAKHALIN VOLCANIC ERUPTION RESPONSE TEAM (SVERT)- AVO).

Related Links:

.

Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »