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Posts Tagged ‘Mount Sinabung’

Saudi Air War Massacre Kills Hundreds in Yemen

Posted by feww on April 3, 2015

UPDATED

Hundreds killed, many wounded, tens of thousands displaced amid Saudi air raids in Yemen

At least 519 people have been killed, about 1,700 others wounded in the past two weeks—more than 90 of them children—and tens of thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes, some by crossing the sea to Djibouti and Somalia, said Valerie Amos, the UN Undersecretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator in her latest statement on Yemen.

Electricity, water and essential medicines are in short supply, she added.

“Before this recent escalation in the violence, millions of Yemenis were already extremely vulnerable.”

The Air War Massacre Will Backfire

Saudi military air war massacre against the defenseless Yemen people will ultimately backfire, says journalist Thomas C. Mountain.

“In 2009 the Saudi military’s incompetence was exposed when their major offensive against the Houthi’s along the Saudi/Yemen border was routed and in the following Houthi counter offensive a large chunk of Saudi territory was captured by the lightly armed Houthi fighters.”

“Still stinging from their last military humiliation 6 years ago at the hands of the Houthi tribal fighters in Yemen, the Saudi Arabian royal family has embarked on what is highly likely to turn into Saudi’s ‘Vietnam’ with their latest attempt at invading Yemen.”

Houthis, having seized the presidential palace in Aden on Thursday, are now threatening to attack Saudi Arabia, should the aerial bombardment of Yemeni territory continue, said reports.

Even the U.S. should be weary of Saudi misadventures by now.

Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

Kenya attack: 147 killed 80 wounded

At least 147 people, mostly students, were killed after al-Shabab terrorists attacked Garissa University in northeastern Kenya Thursday, said reports.

Heavily armed terrorists stormed the university campus, killing several security guards and firing indiscriminately on students.

The group was also responsible for the 2013 terrorist attack on Westgate shopping mall in the Westlands suburb of Nairobi, in which 67 people were massacred.

Iraqi Death Toll – March 2015

A total of 997 Iraqis were killed and another 2,172 were wounded in acts of terrorism and violence in March*, according to casualty figures released by UNAMI,

  • At least 729 civilians were killed (including 42 civilian police), and 1,785 others wounded (including 98 civilian police).
  • Also 268 members of the Iraqi Security Forces (including Peshmerga, SWAT and militias fighting alongside the Iraqi Army / Not including casualties from Anbar Operations) were killed and 387 others were wounded.
  • Baghdad was the worst affected Governorate with 1,290 civilian casualties (362 killed, 928 wounded). Diyala suffered 51 killed and 75 wounded; Salahadin suffered 34 killed and 48 wounded, and Ninewa 20 killed and 15 wounded, said UNAMI.
  • In Anbar, the Governorate reported a total of 939 civilian casualties (237 killed and 702 wounded). This included 58 killed and 391 wounded in Ramadi and 179 killed and 311 wounded in Fallujah, according to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate.

*CAVEATS: In general, UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in conflict areas.  Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate are provided by the Health Directorate and are noted above. In some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents.  UNAMI has also received, without being able to verify, reports of large numbers of casualties along with unknown numbers of persons who have died from secondary effects of violence after having fled their homes due to exposure to the elements, lack of water, food, medicines and health care.  For these reasons, the figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum.

Mount Sinabung Erupts

North Sumatra’s Mount Sinabung erupted again on April 3, 2015 ejecting a 2-km column of ash into the air and forcing evacuations of several villages closest to the volcano, official said on  Friday.

The 2,460-meter thigh volcano is located about 40 km NNW of the Lake Toba, the site of Toba supervolcano.

Toba’s latest supereruption, which occurred about 70,000 years (73,000 ± 4,000) ago, may have plunged Earth into a global volcanic winter of 6–10 years and possibly a 1,000-year-long cooling episode, according to Toba catastrophe theory.

It had an estimated volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 8 (described as “Apocalyptic”), and was responsible for 2,800km³ of erupted matter, including 800 km³ of volcanic ash.

[FIRE-EARTH models show total erupted matter from the supereruption may have been as much as 20,000 km³.]

Posted in News Alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

22 Indonesian Volcanoes Remain on High Alerts

Posted by feww on November 16, 2013

5 Indonesian volcanoes remain on the 2nd highest state of alert, “orange,” 17 others on “yellow”

The alerts follow the latest eruption at Mt Sinabung, which saw the volcano ejecting ash to a height of about 7 km above the summit, forcing the authorities to evacuate about  5,600 people in several villages, according to Indonesia’s Center for Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation (PVMBG).

Indonesian authorities have established a 3-km exclusion zone near the volcano following the Tuesday eruption for the second time in 9 days.

PVMBG had issued a “level three,” or “orange alert,” recommending villagers to stay out of the 3-km danger zone on November 3, 2013, followed by a 7-day state of emergency declared by the local authorities.

The explosive activity follows a series of most recent eruptions exhibited by the 2,460-meter high volcano that began in September 2013, leading to a significant eruption on October 24, which saw the volcano spewing smoke and ash to a height of about 3km above the crater summit, followed by other eruptions, especially the explosive eruption that occurred on Sunday, November 3.

Mt Sinabung is one of 130 or so active volcanoes in the Indonesian archipelago, whose 18,307 islands (922 of the islands are permanently inhabited) straddle the Pacific Ring of Fire (PRF).

PRF, aka the circum-Pacific seismic belt, is home to 452 volcanoes, or more than 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes.

About 90% of the global seismicity and 82% of the largest quakes occur along PRF  [FIRE-EARTH data.]

mt sinabung
Mt Sinabung erupted explosively again on November 12, 2013 for a second time in 9 days. Image credit: CRIonLine via Xinhua. More images…

Mount Sinabung -ANTARA
Mount Sinabung spewing volcanic ashes as seen from Simpang Empat Village in Karo, North Sumatera (September 15, 2013). Credit:  ANTARA/Septianda Perdana.

Mt Sinabung erupted in August 2010 after 410 years of dormancy. The eruption claimed a dozen lives and displaced thousands of others. The eruption which occurred on August 29, 2010 was followed by a more powerful explosion the next day, and much stronger blast on September 7, 2010.

Sinabung spewed ash to a height of about 2km in its second eruption in two days on August 30, 2010.


Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in Suka Nalu village in the district of Tanah Karo, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province August 30, 2010. The Indonesian volcano that erupted for the first time in centuries on Sunday spewed fresh plumes of smoke early on Monday morning, causing panic in nearby villages and delaying local flights, officials said on Monday.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.  More photos …


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.


Mount Sinabung ejected tephra into the air as seen from Tanah Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Dedy Zulkifli). Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Krakatoa [Krakatau] Cataclysmic Eruption 1883

ashcroft -riv thames
William Ashcroft painting “On the Banks of the River Thames” in London, November 26, 1883 [Exactly three months after Krakatoa’s cataclysmic 1883 eruption.]

The Krakatoa eruption affected the climate driving the weather patterns wild for the next 5 years. Average global temperatures fell by about 1.2 °C in the following years, returning to normal only in 1888.

The eruption ejected about 21 cubic kilometers of volcanic matter and destroyed two-thirds of the Krakatoa island. The explosion also spawned giant tsunamis killing an estimated 40,000 people.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Indonesia Volcano Alerts

PVMBG has placed five volcanoes on the second highest level of activity “Level III, Orange Alert,” and 17 others on  third highest alert level “Level II, Yellow Alert.” Following table shows the alert level designations, as of November 16, 2013.

indonesia volcano alerts 3nov13 -fire-earth-blog
Indonesia Volcano Alerts as of November 16, 2013. Source: PVMBG. Image enhanced by FIRE-EARTH Blog.

Related Links

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic event, volcanic hazard, volcanism report | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sinabung Volcano Explodes

Posted by feww on November 3, 2013

Mount Sinabung in North Sumatra erupts explosively

North Sumatra’s Sinabung volcano erupted explosively early Sunday, ejecting a column of smoke and ash up to 7,000 meters above the summit on November 3, according to Indonesia’s Center for Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation (PVMBG).

Authorities have established a 3-km exclusion zone and are evacuating 4 villages, according to local reports.

The explosive activity follows a series of most recent eruptions exhibited by the 2,460-meter high volcano that began in September, 2013, leading to a significant eruption on October 24, which saw the volcano spewing smoke and ash to a height of about 3km above the crater summit.

Mt Sinabung is one of 130 or so active volcanoes in the Indonesian archipelago, whose 18,307 islands (922 of the islands are permanently inhabited) straddle the Pacific Ring of Fire (PRF).

PRF, aka the circum-Pacific seismic belt, is home to 452 volcanoes, or more than 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes.

About 90% of the global seismicity and 82% of the largest quakes occur along PRF [FIRE-EARTH data.]

Mount Sinabung -ANTARA
Mount Sinabung spewing volcanic ashes as seen from Simpang Empat Village in Karo, North Sumatera (September 15, 2013). Credit:  ANTARA/Septianda Perdana.

Mt Sinabung erupted in August 2010 after 410 years of dormancy. The eruption claimed a dozen lives and displaced thousands of others. The eruption which occurred on August 29, 2010 was followed by a more powerful explosion the next day, and much stronger blast on September 7, 2010.

Sinabung spewed ash to a height of about 2km in its second eruption in two days on August 30, 2010.


Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in Suka Nalu village in the district of Tanah Karo, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province August 30, 2010. The Indonesian volcano that erupted for the first time in centuries on Sunday spewed fresh plumes of smoke early on Monday morning, causing panic in nearby villages and delaying local flights, officials said on Monday.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.  More photos …


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history.


Mount Sinabung ejected tephra into the air as seen from Tanah Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. (AP Photo/Dedy Zulkifli). Image may be subject to copyright.

Indonesian Volcanoes

Indonesian Volcanoes have been responsible for a number of cataclysmic explosions in modern history.

Krakatoa [Krakatau] Cataclysmic Eruption 1883

ashcroft -riv thames
William Ashcroft painting “On the Banks of the River Thames” in London, November 26, 1883 [Exactly three months after Krakatoa’s cataclysmic 1883 eruption.]

The Krakatoa eruption affected the climate driving the weather patterns wild for the next 5 years. Average global temperatures fell by about 1.2 °C in the following years, returning to normal only in 1888.

The eruption ejected about 21 cubic kilometers of volcanic matter and destroyed two-thirds of the Krakatoa island. The explosion also spawned giant tsunamis killing an estimated 40,000 people.

Karakatoa
An 1888 lithograph of the 1883 violent explosion of Krakatau.

Based on their models, our colleagues at EDRO forecast that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Indonesia Volcano Alerts

PVMBG has placed five volcanoes on the second highest level of activity “Level III, Orange Alert,” and 6 others at the third highest alert level “Level II, Yellow Alert.” Following table shows the alert level designations together with the last date of eruption, as of November 3, 2013.

indonesia volcano alerts 3nov13 -fire-earth-blog
Indonesia Volcano Alerts as of November 3, 2013. Source: PVMBG. Image enhanced by FIRE-EARTH Blog.

Related Links

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Thousands Flee Mount Sinabung Eruption

Posted by feww on September 16, 2013

Mount Sinabung records first eruption in 3 years

Thousands of people from 12 villages near the volcano located in North Sumatra’s Karo regency were forced to flee their homes after Mount Sinabung erupted on Sunday, it’s first eruption since 2010, reports said.

The volcano erupted at at 2:45 a.m. local time and continued to eject volcanic matter for at least 7 hours.

“There is the potential for another eruption; therefore, we are calling on people to remain alert,” said the Geological Disaster Mitigation and Volcanology Center (PVMBG).

Mt Sinabung erupted in August 2010 after 410 years of dormancy. The eruption claimed a dozen lives and displaced thousands of others.

The eruption which occurred on August 29, 2010 was followed by a more powerful explosion the next day, and much stronger blast on September 7, 2010.

Mount Sinabung -ANTARA
Mount Sinabung spewing volcanic ashes as seen from Simpang Empat Village in Karo, North Sumatera (9/15). Credit:  ANTARA/Septianda Perdana. 


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.
Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

The PVMBG categorizes Sinabung as a type A volcano, or those that have erupted since 1600. Type B volcanoes have not erupted since 1600 but show signs of activity, and type C are those that have not erupted in recorded history, said a report.

Related Links

Posted in active volcano, Indonesia volcanoes, News Alert, sumatra volcano | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mt Merapi Erupts Again, 70,000 Evacuated

Posted by feww on November 1, 2010

Java’s Mount Merapi volcano erupted again forcing up to 70,000 to evacuate


Mount Merapi volcano spews smoke as seen from Sidorejo village in Klaten, near Yogyakarta November 1, 2010. REUTERS/Beawiharta. Image may be subject to copyright.

Merapi’s latest eruption on Monday, the third in a week, ejecting  a dense plume of ash cloud up into the air to a height of about 1.5 km, local volcanologists reported.

Two other volcanoes, Mount Anak Krakatau (Sunda strait) and Mount Sinabung (North Sumatra), are also showing signs of increased activity, they said.

Major Volcanoes of Indonesia



Mt Sinabung, Krakatoa and Merapi Volcanoes Location Map
. Source of the original map: USGS. Map enhanced by Fire-Earth
. Click image to enlarge.

Videos and more images are available at: HVO

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

Posted in environment, Krakatoa, Mount Merapi volcano, sumatra volcano, volcano, volcano erupts, Volcano Hazard, Volcano News | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Sinabung Erupts Again

Posted by feww on August 30, 2010

Mount Sinabung 2nd eruption ‘more powerful’

Sinabung spewed ash to a height of about 2km in its second eruption in two days


Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in Suka Nalu village in the district of Tanah Karo, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province August 30, 2010. The Indonesian volcano that erupted for the first time in centuries on Sunday spewed fresh plumes of smoke early on Monday morning, causing panic in nearby villages and delaying local flights, officials said on Monday.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.  More photos …

According to Indonesia’s head volcanologist, Surono, Today’s eruption was more powerful than the first yesterday.

“Earlier today was another eruption at 6.30 a.m., sending out smoke as high as two km, more or less.” He said.

“I saw some hot pieces of volcanic rock come out and burn trees in the area,” A Reuters photographer said

“People have been evacuated from areas within a six km (four-mile) radius of the volcano,” vulcanologist Surono said. “Beyond six km it is safe, but there has still been a lot of panic among people here who don’t understand that.”

He said it was impossible to know when the eruptions would stop, but it was unlikely volcanic dust would drift to neighboring countries.

“Here, [the volcanic dash]  is three millimeters (1/8 of an inch) thick on the leaves of plants,” he said, adding that he did not believe the neighboring countries would be affected as a result of this eruptive episode.

Our colleagues at EDRO believe that the collapse of Singapore may occur as a result of volcanic activity on the island of Sumatra. However, they have not disclosed any further detail.

Earlier Entries:

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Recommended Links

Posted in sumatra volcano, volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano, Volcano News | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Mount Sinabung Erupts

Posted by feww on August 29, 2010

Lava spewing ‘like a ball of fire’

Indonesian officials have issued a red alert after Mount Sinabung on the island of Sumatra began spewing lava early Sunday morning.


Villagers ride a motorcycle while covering their mouths at the district of Tanah Karo outside the city of Medan, North Sumatra, as the Mount Sinabung volcano spews smoke in the background August 28, 2010.  Credit: Reuters/Tarmizy Harva. Image may be subject to copyright.

The volcano had been spewing smoke and ash to a height of about 1.5km a.s.l. throughout Saturday, local reports said, quoting  eye witnesses who saw lava spewing out of the volcano from 7 km away.

The authorities have evacuated up to 15,000 residents living near the volcano.

Mount Sinabung is one of Indonesia’s 130  active volcanoes, and had last erupted about 400 years ago.

The head of Indonesia’s vulcanology center was quoted by Reuters as saying:

“This is the first time since 1600 that Sinabung erupted [although there are no activities recorded] and we have little knowledge in terms on its eruptive patterns and general forms.”


The conical Sinabung volcano, seen here from the east, rises above farmlands on the Kato Plateau. Gunung Sinabung contains four summit craters, the southernmost of which is the youngest. Many prominent lava flows appear on the flanks of the volcano. No confirmed historical eruptions are known from Gunung Sinabung. Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1987 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP

Sinabung Volcano: Summary of Details

Country: Indonesia
Region: Sumatra
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Holocene
Last Known Eruption: Unknown [1600?]
Summit Elevation: 2,460
m
Latitude: 3.17°N
Longitude: 98.392°E
Source: GVP

Sinabung is located in Group K Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.


Sinabung volcano, seen from Gurukinayan village on the south, shows prominent lava flows on its flanks and a dramatic summit spine. The summit of Gunung Sinabung is much less frequently visited than neighboring Sabayak volcano to the NE. Photo by S. Wikartadipura, 1982 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia). Source: GVP.


Approximate location of Sinabung is marked  on the map by FEWW.

The volcano is located about 260km east of the epicenter of the 9.1 – 9.3Mw earthquake which struck off the coast of Sumatra on December 26, 2004, triggering the deadly Boxing Day Tsunami.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Posted in volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanism, volcano, volcano alert, volcano eruption, Volcano News | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »