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Posts Tagged ‘Nyiragongo’

VolcanoWatch Weekly [10 Feb 2011]

Posted by feww on February 10, 2011

Summary of Weekly Volcanic Activity Report – 2 February to 8 February 2011

[Source: SI/USGS]

Recent Activity at Kizimen Volcano


Kizimen Volcano
blows out a plume of ash, smoke and steam over the  Gulf of Kamchatka on February 1, 2011.  Kizimen recent eruptions are said to be both explosive and effusive. This natural-color image was taken by the MODIS aboard the Aqua satellite. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.


Kizimen Volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula (elev. 2,376m, or 7,795 ft),  ejected a plume of ash, steam and volcanic gasses on January 6, 2011, when
ALI on NASA’s EO-1 satellite captured this natural-color image.  Kizimen had released continuous ash emissions since December 31, 2010, KVERT reported. Kizimen erupted explosively 83 years ago. Source: NASA-EO. Click image to enlarge.


Eruption of Kizimen volcano on January 26, 2011. Photo by P. Shpilenok. http://shpilenok.livejournal.com/44922.html (Image may be subject to copyright.)

New Activity/Unrest:

Map of Volcanoes


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity:

For additional information, see source.

Related Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

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Posted in Volcano Watch, Volcano Watch Weekly, VolcanoWatch Weekly | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mount Nyamulagira Erupting, Again?

Posted by feww on January 3, 2010

Mount Nyamulagira in DR Congo erupted

Lava from Mount Nyamulagira Saturday eruption sent lava into the surrounding Virunga National Park, BBC reported.


Photo released by the Congolese Wildlife Authority, Virunga National Park, shows Nyamulagira erupting early Saturday local time on January 2, 2010.

Mount Nyamuragira, Africa’s most active volcano, is located about 25km (16 miles) north of Goma. A large section of the city of Goma (population of 200,000 plus at least 100,000 war refugees), located in the east of the country was destroyed in 2002 after  Mount Nyiragongo erupted.

Lava spewed along the volcano’s southern flank into Virunga National Park, but avoided the nearby villages. there were no casualties reported. However, about 4 dozen endangered chimpanzees as well as other animals live near the volcano.

One of Virunga’s wardens told reporters: “I saw the mountain was on fire with sparks flying.”

Nyamulagira has erupted about 40 times since the late 19th century.


Following a loud explosion at 03:45 local time (01:45 UTC) Lava from Nyamuragira flowed along the volcano’s southern section incinerating everything on its path. Freeze frame from CCTV. Image may be subject to copyright.

FEWW Comment: If we are looking at a sulfur dioxide dispersal scenario in relation to the Earth’s defense mechanism against Warming, then the latest eruption could have been just an opening salvo in the upcoming eruptions of Nyamulagira and its neighbor Nyiragongo volcano.

Major Volcanoes of the DR Congo

In May 2009 Scientists in the DR Congo recorded a significant increase in volcanic activity around the city of Goma.


A general view of the refugee camp at Kibati at the foot of Nyiragongo volcano in eastern Congo, November 14, 2008.  REUTERS/Finbarr O’Reilly. Image may be subject to copyright.

Volcano: Nyamuragira

Country:  DR Congo
Region: Central Africa
Volcano Type: Shield volcano
Last Known Eruption: 2006
Summit Elevation: 3058 m  (10,033 feet)
Latitude: 1.408°S   (1°24′30″S)
Longitude: 29.20°E  (29°12′0″E)
Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP)


Lava fountains from the new cone of Mikombe on the lower NE flank of Zaire’s Nyamuragira volcano feed the lava flow in the foreground. This photo was taken from the SE on September 29, nine days after the start of the eruption. During the first week the new cone, whose name means “many bats,” grew to a height of 60-70 m. Lava flows had traveled 6-7 km NE by the time of this photo. The eruption continued until February 1993, by which time lava flows had traveled 19 km to the NE. Photo by Minoru Kasahara, 1991 (Hokkaido University). Caption GVP.


Depiction of the Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira volcanoes, based on data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Landsat. Vertical scale exaggerated (1.5x).  Image ID: PIA03337.  Date: February 2000 – December 2001. Image:Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira – PIA03337.png (high resolution) . NASA/JPL/NIMA


Depiction of the Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira volcanoes, based on data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, or Aster, and Landsat. Some lava flows (not all) from the 2002-01-17 eruption are shown in red. Date: February 2000 – January 2002. Image ID: PIA03339.  NASA/JPL/NIMA


The summit of Nyamuragira volcano is truncated by 2 x 2.3 km wide caldera whose floor is partially covered by unvegetated historical lava flows. This view from above the SW caldera rim shows a pit crater on the far side of the caldera at the upper left that was the site of a lava lake, active since at least 1921, which drained in 1938 at the time of a major flank eruption. Africa’s most active volcano, 3058-m-high Nyamuragira rises about 25 km north of Lake Kivu in the East African Rift Valley NW of Nyiragongo volcano.  Photo by Simon Carn, 2004 (TOMS Volcanic Emissions Group, University of Maryland, Baltimore County). CAption: GVP.

From: Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program Website, 2002

Africa’s most active volcano, Nyamuragira is a massive basaltic shield volcano that rises north of Lake Kivu across a broad valley northwest of Nyiragongo volcano. The volcano has a volume of 500 cubic kilometers and extensive lava flows from Nyamuragira cover 1500 square kilometers of the East African Rift. The 3058-meter-high summit is truncated by a small 2 x 2.3 kilometer summit caldera that has walls up to about 100 meters high. Historical eruptions have occurred within the summit caldera, frequently modifying the morphology of the caldera floor, as well as from the numerous fissures and cinder cones on the volcano’s flanks. A lava lake in the summit crater, active since at least 1921, drained in 1938. Twentieth-century lava flows extend down the flanks more than 30 km from the summit, reaching as far as Lake Kivu.

SO2 emissions from Mount Nyamulagira’s previous eruption on November 27, 2006


The Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA’s Aura satellite tracked the emission of SO2 gas from the volcano between November 28 and December 4, 2006. The sulfur dioxide concentrations are shown here using a logarithmic color scale. (The value at the top of the scale is about 149 times greater than the value at the bottom.) Credit: NASA.

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Posted in Africa volcano, DR Congo, Nyamuragira, Virunga National Park, volcano | Tagged: , , , , | 5 Comments »

Weekly VolcanoWatch [13 May 2009]

Posted by feww on May 14, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 6 May – 12 May 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Curacoa


A submarine volcano south of Curacoa Reef at the northern end of the Tofua volcanic arc was first observed in eruption in 1973. Explosive eruptions, which produced large rafts of dacitic pumice covering an area of more than 100 sq km, were observed from the island of Tafahi, 27 km to the SSW. The eruption site was located about 6.5 km SW of Curacoa Reef. Multiple submarine vents are apparently located in this area; a second eruption was reported in 1979 from a location 13 km north of Tafahi. Photo by the crew of the vessel “Port Nicholson,” 1973 (courtesy of Tom Simkin, Smithsonian Institution). Caption: GVP.

FEWW Forecast: FEWW earth model suggests Curacoa may explode spectacularly in one or more episodes this year. [Photos, or eye-witness accounts of any activity will get an honorable mention on the blog.]

  • Country: Tonga
  • Region: Tonga Islands
  • Volcano Type: Submarine volcano
  • Last Known Eruption: 1979
  • Summit Elevation: -33 m – 108 feet
  • Latitude: 15.62°S 15°37’0″S
  • Longitude: 173.67°W 173°40’0″W

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 22:20 AKDT (May 14, 2009 06:20 UTC)

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Veniaminof Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Related Links:

Posted in Chaiten, Curacoa, Ebeko, Kīlauea, Rinjani | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Is Mt Nyamulagira Erupting?

Posted by feww on May 11, 2009

Scientists in the DR Congo have reportedly recorded significant increased volcanic activity around the city of Goma

Mount Nyamuragira, Africa’s most active volcano, about 25km (16 miles) north of Goma, may soon erupt.

A large section of the city of Goma, located in the east of the country was destroyed in 2002 after  Mount Nyiragongo erupted.

Scientist Dieudonne Wafula told the BBC on May 8, if it did erupt, there would not be an immediate threat to Goma, but some key rural roads could be cut off.


A general view of the refugee camp at Kibati at the foot of Nyiragongo volcano in eastern Congo, November 14, 2008.  REUTERS/Finbarr O’Reilly. Image may be subject to copyright.

Volcano: Nyamuragira

Country:  DR Congo
Region: Central Africa
Volcano Type: Shield volcano
Last Known Eruption: 2006
Summit Elevation: 3058 m  (10,033 feet)
Latitude: 1.408°S   (1°24’30″S)
Longitude: 29.20°E  (29°12’0″E)
Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP)

Lava fountains from the new cone of Mikombe on the lower NE flank of Zaire’s Nyamuragira volcano feed the lava flow in the foreground. This photo was taken from the SE on September 29, nine days after the start of the eruption. During the first week the new cone, whose name means “many bats,” grew to a height of 60-70 m. Lava flows had traveled 6-7 km NE by the time of this photo. The eruption continued until February 1993, by which time lava flows had traveled 19 km to the NE. Photo by Minoru Kasahara, 1991 (Hokkaido University). Caption GVP.



Depiction of the Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira volcanoes, based on data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Landsat. Vertical scale exaggerated (1.5x).  Image ID: PIA03337.  Date: February 2000 – December 2001. Image:Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira – PIA03337.png (high resolution) . NASA/JPL/NIMA


Depiction of the Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira volcanoes, based on data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, or Aster, and Landsat. Some lava flows (not all) from the 2002-01-17 eruption are shown in red. Date: February 2000 – January 2002. Image ID: PIA03339.  NASA/JPL/NIMA


The summit of Nyamuragira volcano is truncated by 2 x 2.3 km wide caldera whose floor is partially covered by unvegetated historical lava flows. This view from above the SW caldera rim shows a pit crater on the far side of the caldera at the upper left that was the site of a lava lake, active since at least 1921, which drained in 1938 at the time of a major flank eruption. Africa’s most active volcano, 3058-m-high Nyamuragira rises about 25 km north of Lake Kivu in the East African Rift Valley NW of Nyiragongo volcano.  Photo by Simon Carn, 2004 (TOMS Volcanic Emissions Group, University of Maryland, Baltimore County). CAption: GVP.

Major Volcanoes of the DR Congo

From: Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program Website, 2002

Africa’s most active volcano, Nyamuragira is a massive basaltic shield volcano that rises north of Lake Kivu across a broad valley northwest of Nyiragongo volcano. The volcano has a volume of 500 cubic kilometers and extensive lava flows from Nyamuragira cover 1500 square kilometers of the East African Rift. The 3058-meter-high summit is truncated by a small 2 x 2.3 kilometer summit caldera that has walls up to about 100 meters high. Historical eruptions have occurred within the summit caldera, frequently modifying the morphology of the caldera floor, as well as from the numerous fissures and cinder cones on the volcano’s flanks. A lava lake in the summit crater, active since at least 1921, drained in 1938. Twentieth-century lava flows extend down the flanks more than 30 km from the summit, reaching as far as Lake Kivu.

From Reuters

From Reuters, Cnn

GOMA, Democratic Republic of Congo — A river of molten rock continued to pour from a volcano in Congo on Friday, a day after it erupted, killing 45, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the city of Goma.

Hundreds of U.N. workers were also forced to flee in the 24 hours since waves of lava began forking from Mount Nyiragongo volcano through villages on its slopes, down through Goma itself and on to Lake Kivu on the Rwandan border.

Gaping holes opened up in Goma, normally a city of more than 500,000 but now virtually a ghost town, and molten rock reduced roads and buildings to fiery ash.

Fourteen villages in the path of the lava were said to have been incinerated.

“The smell of sulphur is everywhere, there are tremors every 10 minutes,” Desire Bukasa, a radio controller for a U.N. agency in Goma, told Reuters.

“I’m trying to work out how to evacuate the town. There are fissures opening up in the town which billow smoke. People are scared.”

Tens of thousands hurriedly left possessions behind and fled across the border into Rwanda as a two metre high surge of molten lava advanced from the 3,469-metre (11,380 foot) volcano, destroying everything in its path.

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Posted in Dieudonne Wafula, high-potassium basaltic shield volcano, Lake Kivu, lava flow, volcanic eruption | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »