Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘oil and gas drilling’

“No lesson” from the BP disaster

Posted by feww on June 10, 2011

Quotes of the Day

Environmental groups sue Obama admin over Shell drilling approval in GOM

“It is as if the government regulators have learned nothing from the BP disaster,” said Earthjustice attorney David Guest.

The Royal Dutch Shell Plc plans to drill five exploratory wells about 2,000 meters under water and three previously approved wells some 100 km off the coast of Louisiana, a report said.

We need different means of farming?

“It’s screaming to me that things are getting hotter and drier at different times of the year. Our summers are getting wetter and if this trend continues, then we will have to find different means of farming,” said Australian farmer Charlie Bragg, who farms on a 3,000 hectare block about two hours drive west of Canberra, the Australian capital.

The Day After

Blog models show a prolonged, deadly drought as the most probable scenario to follow the epic flooding in the United States: FIRE-EARTH

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Britain and Argentina Headed Toward Another War?

Posted by feww on February 22, 2010

It’s about oil, again!

Another War in Falklands Could Flare Before Natural Gas Does

The Falklands War, which followed Argentina’s “re-occupation” of  the Falklands in 1982, claimed the lives of 649 Argentine and 255 British soldiers.

Argentina considered the action as the “re-occupation of its own territory,” where as the British government saw it as an “invasion” of a “British dependent territory” and dispatched its naval force to retake the islands.

The limited war fought between the two countries resulted from the centuries-old dispute over the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands, as well as South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, which were initially occupied by France in 1764.

The islands lie in the South Atlantic, about 400 miles east of Argentina and some 8,000 miles away from Britain.

Geographically, Argentina has a legitimate claim to the sovereignty of Falkland Islands—proximity.

Cancun Summit 2010

Leaders of 32 Latin American and Caribbean countries unanimously backed Argentina’s claim to the Falkland Islands at a 2010 Cancun summit in Mexico, said a report .

In their  statement, the 32 leaders reaffirmed “backing for Argentina’s legitimate rights in its sovereignty dispute with the United Kingdom relating to the ‘Malvinas Question,'” and condemned the oil drilling operations.

The Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva called on the UN to debate Argentina’s sovereignty claim to the islands.

“What is the geographic, the political or economic explanation for England [Britain] to be in Las Malvinas?” Lula asked.

“Could it be because England is a permanent member of the UN’s Security Council where they can do everything and the others nothing?”

The Undesired

Desire Petroleum, a UK energy company, probably owned by one or more of the multinationals, is about to begin drilling for oil in the territorial waters of the Falkland Islands, in the South Atlantic Ocean, despite strong objections from Argentina.


The semi-submersible Giant oil rig Ocean Guardian, built 24 years ago, traveled 62 days  from Invergordon on the Cromarty Firth to the Falklands. Source: Desire Petroleum.  “Desire Petroleum estimates potential oil reserves exceeding 3.5 billion barrels and more than nine trillion cubic feet of gas. … In 1998 six wells were drilled to the north of the islands that revealed the presence of a rich organic source rock that could hold up to 60 billion barrels of oil.”

The oil fields near Falklands are said to hold an estimated total of 60 billion barrels; however, Desire Petroleum, has said “the amount which could be exploited commercially would probably be a fraction of that.” BBC UK reported.  [The rest of it would be released in the ocean to keep an oil-rich marine environment.]

Desire Oil has towed a platform to a drilling site about 100km (62 miles) north of the Falklands. Drilling was scheduled to  start at 06:00UTC today.

Argentina, which has long claimed the islands, known locally as las Malvinas, filed a claim with the United Nations “for a vast expanse of ocean, based on research into the extent of the continental shelf, stretching to the Antarctic and including the island chains governed by the UK, ” BBC reported.

Based on the claim, Argentina says drilling by the UK company violates its sovereignty and has since imposed shipping restrictions around the Falklands, and has threatened to take “adequate measures” to stop “British oil exploration in contested waters around the islands.”

Argentine government has asked its neighbors to also impose shipping restrictions in the area, and  is further seeking support from Latin American countries.

According to desire oil, Argentina is about to start its own exploration off the west west coast of the islands.


Map of the region with exploration areas marked. Source: UN/ BBC UK.

Comments made by various parties:

President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela: Britain is acting irrationally and it’s high time it realized the “time for empires was over.”

Argentinian Govt:  No war this time, but Britain must negotiate sovereignty.

UN: He who has nukes calls the tunes.

Desire Petroleum [having towed the giant rig, the Ocean Guardian,about 13,000 km (6,950 NM) from the Cromarty Firth, Scotland] : “Desire is an oil company and it’s exploring for oil and not getting involved in what Argentina is saying about going to the UN. The rig is sitting firmly inside UK waters.” Even if the commercially viable quantities of oil were to be found in the are, it would many years before any oil would be recovered. The Company spokesman added.

Falklands Legislative Assembly [“The Licensor”]:  We have “every right” to do “legitimate business.”

UK Foreign Secretary David Miliband:  British oil exploration in the Falklands is “completely in accordance with international law.” [British government may be occupied by Israel-first interests, but Britain is not like Israel.]

UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown:  UK government has “made all the preparations that are necessary to make sure the Falkland islanders are properly protected.” [We have nukes; Argies don’t.]

Related Links:

Posted in Desire Petroleum, energy war, Malvinas, offshore oil, oil and gas exploration | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Big Oil Itching to Drill to the Last Straw

Posted by feww on November 20, 2009

Big Oil Prods Congress for More Offshore Drilling

We’d like to rape and plunder some more before killing the marine environment: Big Oil

Big oil says they must have more offshore areas for oil and natural gas drilling, citing the same old, tired, discredited and pathetic excuse that America would be less reliant on foreign suppliers that way.


Offshore drilling: Rape and plunder in the high seas.
Source of Photo: yourdemocracy.net.au

“There is some hypocrisy in locking these resources away while relying on resources produced in other countries,” said Marvin Odum, the President of Shell Oil Co., the U.S. arm of Royal Dutch Shell Plc.

“Instead, we should embrace policies that provide access to our own oil and gas resources,” Reuters reported Odum as saying to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee at hearing on offshore energy production.

“The U.S. Interior Department is considering a five-year plan that might open new offshore areas to drilling.” Reuters reported.

“But many environmental groups oppose expanded offshore drilling, fearing oil spills could result, especially when energy companies move into the deeper waters of the Gulf of Mexico where platforms are susceptible to hurricanes.”

The recent Australian oil disaster in Timor Sea is but the latest deadly reminder of the perils of offshore oil and gas drilling. For about 11 weeks the leak from the West atlas drilling rig and the Montara wellhead platform, which eventually caught fire early November, spewed oil and gas condensate at a rate of at least 400 barrels a day, polluting the fragile ecosystems in the region leaving tens of thousands of marine creatures dead.


PTTEP Australasia, the company responsible for the major oil disaster in the Timor Sea, said they pumped mud into a relief well in their fourth attempt to plug the leak, which had spewed oil and gas condensate at at least 400 barrels a day for nearly 11 weeks, before extinguishing the platform fire.  (PTTEP Australasia).

“The potentially irreversible effects of oil pollution on marine ecosystems and their dependent economies do not justify the potential short-term economic gains that might accrue from offshore oil and gas development,” said Jeffrey Short with the international marine conservation group Oceana.

The big oil says they have improved their drilling technology which allows oil companies to rape the marine environment in a friendly way.

“These advances enable more production while reducing environmental impacts and allowing for efficient use of existing facilities and infrastructure,” said David Rainey, VP of Gulf of Mexico Exploration at BP America, the U.S. arm of the British giant BP Plc.

And this came on a day when early impact of climate change  wrought havoc on Britain, with torrential rains  and up to 153 km/h wind gusts battering several coastal regions, triggering waist-high floods in several cities.

“Finding oil and gas for the future requires exploring in areas that are ever deeper and more complex,” Rainey boasted.

“We must stop ignoring the fact that oil and gas will play a major part in meeting America’s energy demands for several decades as we transition to a more sustainable energy future,” said Shell’s Odum.

You know full well Mr Odum that  you don’t even have several years, let alone several decades. Stop the mass deception! Quit the unintelligent “transition to a more sustainable energy” mantra. You’re not fooling all of us all the time.

Take your sick economy and shoot her in the head because our oceans simply can’t cope anymore!

Related Links:

Related News Links:

Recent Oil Spills:

Posted in BP, Gulf of Mexico Exploration, oceans pollution, oil pollution, US Economy, US energy | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Oil Drilling Likely Caused Texas Earthquake

Posted by feww on May 17, 2009

Magnitude 3.3 Quake Strikes Northern Texas

Texas quake likely caused by oil and natural gas drilling activities—Moderators, blog contributors

See below for pictorial evidence / record of

1. Location. The proximity of epicenter to fault zones (quaternary fault and fold deformation).

2. Depth.

3. Historic Seismicity.

Earthquake Details

Magnitude: 3.3
Date-Time:

  • Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 16:24:06 UTC
  • Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 11:24:06 AM at epicenter

Location:  32.796°N, 97.091°W
Depth:  5 km (3.1 miles) set by location program
Region: NORTHERN TEXAS
Distances:

  • 6 km (4 miles) S (179°) from Euless, TX
  • 7 km (4 miles) SE (141°) from Bedford, TX
  • 9 km (6 miles) ESE (118°) from Hurst, TX
  • 11 km (7 miles) NNE (16°) from Arlington, TX
  • 28 km (18 miles) W (269°) from Dallas, TX

Location Uncertainty:  horizontal +/- 9 km (5.6 miles); depth fixed by location program
Parameters:  NST= 11, Nph= 11, Dmin=44.5 km, Rmss=0.86 sec, Gp= 94°, M-type=”Nuttli” surface wave magnitude (mbLg), Version=6

Source: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)

Event ID:  us2009gsba

us2009gsba - 2

us2009gsba - 1

N Texas Quake 16may09 - 3

us2009gsba - 4

West Texas Quaternary Fault and Fold Information for Texas. USGS/Cooperator Texas Bureau of Economic Geology

Gulf of Mexico coastal region: Areas of Quaternary deformation and faulting. (USGS). Click here for Gulf-margin normal faults, Texas and adjacent areas.


Texas Earthquake Information

Historic Information

Institutions

Maps

Notable Earthquakes

Recent Earthquakes

Topics

USGS Information

USGS Geologic Information about Texas

Posted in Arlington TX, Bedford quake, Seismic Hazard, Texas Earthquake, Texas Historic Seismicity | Tagged: , , , , | 17 Comments »