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Posts Tagged ‘Pasig’

Possible Tropical Cyclone Forming Near Luzon

Posted by feww on November 2, 2009

Tropical Depression Tino Moving Towards N. Luzon

At 12:00 UTC, today, Tropical Depression “TINO” was near 17.3°N, 123.9°E, or about 200 km East of Tuguegarao City, moving West at 11 km/h.

  • Maximum sustained winds: 60 kp/h
  • Significant Wave heights: Up to 7.5 meter (23 feet)

“Strong to gale force winds is expected to affect the seaboards of northern and central Luzon,” Philippines DOST PAGASA said.

MTSAT IR  full disk 2-11-09 1200 UTC
MTSAT – IR Still Image – Time and Date as Inset. Click image to update.

possible new tropical  storm
Tropical Depression TINO [local name]  Moving ENE toward northern Luzon. MTSAT IR1. Still Image on 2 November 2009, timed at 12:30UTC. Dost Pagasa. Click image to enlarge and update.

Philippines  Cyclones Since August 2009

  • 30 Oct: Typhoon Mirinae Struck Quezon, leaving up to 20 dead or missing.
  • 3 Oct: Typhoon Parma’s triggered floods and landslides killing more than 200.
  • 26 Sept: Tropical Storm Ketsana dumped more water on Manila and neighboring provinces than ever recorded, killing up to 400, and leaving a quarter of a million people homeless.
  • 7 Aug: Typhoon Morakot swept northern Luzon, killing more than 10 people.

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Previous entries:

Source Page: FEWW Satellite Imagery

MTSAT/ NOAA

Loops/Animations (MTSAT/NOAA/SSD)

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Previous Storms:

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Posted in Climate Change, dividends of climate change, human enhanced natural hazards, tropical cyclones, Western Pacific Typhoon | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mirinae: Philippines Phlooded

Posted by feww on November 1, 2009

Tropical Storm MIRINAE – UPDATE 02 November 2009 at 15:UTC

On 02 November 2009 at 15:00 UTC Tropical Storm MIRINAE was located near 12.5N, 108.0E, or approximately 290 km northeast of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. The strom has been tracking westward (260 degrees) at a forward speed of about 22km/h during the past six hours, having made landfall shortly after 06:00 UTC. “The Low level circulation center (LLCC) is expected to dissolve over land within the next 12 hours. Remnant vorticity may track towards the Gulf of Thailand,” JTWC said, but the LLCC is not expected to redevelop.

  • Maximum Sustained Winds:  85 km/h
  • Maximum Wind Gusts:  102 km/h

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Image of the Day:

Philippines After Mirinae

Santa Cruz streets after mirinae  AP
Philippines Govt sent naval boats to Santa Cruz where roads were heavily flooded. Even after the floodwater receded after rain had eased, it was still reported as “chest-high” in some areas. Photo: AP. Image may be subject to copyright.

Initial Impact of Mirinae on the Philippines

  • Mirinae was the fourth storm in a month to pummel the Philippines.
  • It made landfall on the eastern coastal province of Quezon, buffeting the area with winds of 150 km/h and gusts of up to 190 km/h.
  • The typhoon struck Quezon about 24:00 UTC, Friday, moving west, south of Manila as it weakened overland into a tropical storm Saturday afternoon, and headed in the direction of Vietnam.
  • Heavy rain and strong winds caused more damage to the already storm stricken areas in the region.
  • Typhoon Mirinae took a similar path to storm Ketsana, whose heavy rains inundated Manila in September causing the worst floods in living memory.
  • The worst storm-related floods in living memory have left hundreds dead , with up to a quarter of a million homeless.
  • Up to 20 people have been killed or were reported as missing, including 7 confirmed  deaths, as of posting. A man was drowned and his small baby washed away in Pililla township in Rizal province, east of Manila, as they tried to cross an overflowing creek, reports said.
  • Six more people were killed in Laguna province, south of the capital, and up to a dozen people are reported missing.
  • In the town of Santa Cruz the roads were flooded, residents waded through a chest high mix of muddy floodwater and sewage after Mirinae dumped heavy rains in the area. govt sent in naval boats to help with rescue operation.
  • “The waters were really high. It was like a flashflood. It was waist deep in our area but in other areas it went as high as the rooftops,” a local official was quoted as saying.
  • Up to 120,000 people were evacuated in areas south of Manila. Residents in other areas were told to prepare essential supplies for 3 days, and stay put.
  • Some 180 flights were canceled, dozens of ferries grounded, many schools closed.
  • Areas south of the capital were worst hit by heavy rain and strong winds, which caused significant damage.

Philippines  Cyclones Since August 2009

  • 30 Oct: Typhoon Mirinae Struck Quezon, leaving up to 20 dead or missing.
  • 3 Oct: Typhoon Parma’s triggered floods and landslides killing more than 200.
  • 26 Sept: Tropical Storm Ketsana dumped more water on Manila and neighboring provinces than ever recorded, killing up to 400, and leaving a quarter of a million people homeless.
  • 7 Aug: Typhoon Morakot swept northern Luzon, killing more than 10 people.

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Posted in Climate Change, dividends of climate change, human enhanced natural hazards, Philippines, tropical cyclone, Tropical storm, Typhoon MIRINAE | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

TS MIRINAE – UPDATE 31 October 2009

Posted by feww on October 31, 2009

Typhoon Mirinae, the fourth in a month to strike the Philippines, pummels the island of Luzon

Typhoon MIRINAE – Update on 31 Oct 2009 – Time: 03:00UTC

  • Position: 14.0N 119.5E
  • Location: 105 km (55 nm) southwest of Manila, Philippines
  • Maximum  Sustained Winds: 95 km/h (50 kt)
  • Maximum Wind Gusts : 120 km/h (65 kt)
  • Movement and speed: Tracking  westward [255º] at 28 km/h (15 kt) – gaining speed
  • Maximum Significant Wave Height: 4 m (13 feet)

FEWW Comment: Mirinae could strengthen into a typhoon [Probability = 0.35] again, before making its next landfall in Vietnam

aa mirinae
Tropical Cyclone Mirinae [SANTI] MTSAT IR1. Still Image. Click image to enlarge and update.

Typhoon Mirinae, now weakened to a tropical storm force, struck the main island of Luzon, Philippines early Saturday morning (17:00 UTC Friday), making landfall in the eastern Quezon province, he Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA )reported.

The powerful typhoon “crashed into the Philippine capital Saturday with pounding rain and strong winds, causing a massive power outage, downing trees and bringing fresh floods to areas still partially submerged from a recent deadly storm,” AP reported. 


Residents living in Manila Bay look out from their house that was damaged by Typhoon Mirinae in Bacoor town, south of Manila, October 31, 2009. REUTERS/Erik de Castro. Image may be subject to copyright.

“The Philippine network said knee-deep floodwaters were reported in the village of Salapan and brownouts were reported in parts of Luzon, including metro Manila. Power was out in Quezon province, where the typhoon made landfall, as well as parts of Bicol, Pasig City and Rizal province,” UPI reported.

Up to 150,000 residents in low-lying areas were  evacuated to shelters before the typhoon arrived, the National Disasters Coordinating Council reported. Some 180 flights from Manila were canceled and many ferries were grounded, with more than 10,000 passengers stranded.

Rains caused by Mirinae have worsened the flood-stricken parts of the capital, Manila and surrounding regions caused by earlier storms, which left nearly 1,000 people dead. Up to a quarter of million people remain homeless, including more than 100,000 crammed into temporary  shelters run by the disasters relief agency.

“The government disasters relief agency reported that at least 15 villages and districts in Metro Manila are submerged — some in waist-deep floodwaters,” Xinhua reported.

Ty  Mirinae_AMO_2009303
This natural-color image of the storm was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite at 1:00 p.m. local time October 30 (05:00UTC). The eye of the storm was a large mass of roiling clouds located less than a hundred kilometers northeast of Cataduanes Island in the Philippines. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team. Caption by Rebecca Lindsey, NASA Earth Observatory. Edited by FEWW.

Typhoon MIRINAE – Update on 31 Oct 2009 – Time: 03:00UTC

  • Position: 14.0N 119.5E
  • Location: 105 km (55 nm) southwest of Manila, Philippines
  • Maximum  Sustained Winds: 95 km/h (50 kt)
  • Maximum Wind Gusts : 120 km/h (65 kt)
  • Movement and speed: Tracking  westward [255º] at 28 km/h (15 kt) – gaining speed
  • Maximum Significant Wave Height: 4 m (13 feet)

31-10-09
TC MIRINAE 5-day track forecast. Source: JTWC

Best Track:

Satellite Imagery – animated(Constant Illumination)
Satellite Imagery- animated  (Sun Illumination)

Previous entries:

Source Page: FEWW Satellite Imagery

MTSAT/ NOAA

Loops/Animations (MTSAT/NOAA/SSD)

Related Links:

Previous Storms:

Related Links:

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