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Posts Tagged ‘Philippine Plate’

Strong Quakes Strike Japan, Canada Regions

Posted by feww on September 4, 2013

M6.9 Strikes Izu Islands, Japan Region

The quake, measuring 6.9MW and centered at 29.8°N, 139°E, struck at a depth of about 400km, according to Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). NO tsunami expected.

The event occurred at about 00:18UTC on Wednesday September 4, 2013.

PRF- eq- sep 4-2013
Pacific Ring of Fire – Earthquake Location Map, Sept. 4, 2013. Image source: USGS/EHP.

M6.0  quake strikes 191km WSW of Bella Bella, Canada

A magnitude 6.0 quake struck offshore about 191km (119mi) WSW of Bella Bella, Canada, USGS/EHP reported.

The shallow quake occurred at a depth of about 1km, centered at 51.2°N 130.4°W, said USGS.

The mainshock was followed by several significant aftershocks, the largest of which measured 5.9Mw as of posting.

  1. 5.9Mw + 163km SW of Bella Bella, Canada 2013-09-04 09:23:12 UTC+09:00 Depth of 9.9 km
  2. 5.0Mw + 188km SW of Bella Bella, Canada 2013-09-04 07:29:32 UTC+09:00 9.8 km
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Mayon Lava in Interesting Times!

Posted by feww on December 16, 2009

Mayon Lava Flow Grows

Mayon at a ‘high level of unrest’ may experience  more dangerous explosions


Mt Mayon Spews Lava.
Photo: Reuters. Image may be subject to copyright.

Mayon 5-level hazard alert raised to level 3 Tuesday after Mayon ejected ash and spewed lava.

According to Phivolcs, “Alert level 3 condition signifies magma is near the top of the crater and incandescent materials are now detaching. Mayon volcano is now at a ‘high level of unrest’ and may have more dangerous explosions.”

Quick fact about the latest episode of activity at Mt Mayon:

  • Phivolcs Level 3 alert means an eruption is expected within days to weeks [Level 4 means an eruption is imminent, while level 5 means eruption is in progress.]
  • Albay Governor Jose Salceda has declared “a state of imminent disaster” throughout the province, to allow the provincial government to access disaster funds needed to evacuate residents in Mayon’s danger zones.
  • Phivolcs scientist, Alex Baloloy,  said, “a full blown eruption is expected to take place within weeks to days.”
  • Baloloy said lava had cascaded down about 3 km from the crater summit of the volcano.
  • By Monday Mayon had emitted about 800 tons of Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas.
  • The air in the region has been described as “hot and irritable” and “smelly.”
  • After 23 volcanic quakes on Monday, 5 ash explosions occurred at the volcano generating a mix of brownish and grayish ash cloud.
  • Phivolcs said it had recorded 78 volcanic earthquakes in the last 24 hours
  • Philippines disaster management officials have now evacuated about 50,000 people from Tabaco City and the towns of Malipot, Daraga, Camalig, Guinobatan and Ligao near Mt Mayon, aiming for a “zero-casualty situation.”
  • Schoolrooms within an 8-km radius of Mt Mayon have been suspended and used as evacuation shelters. [Let’s hope the schools are better built in the Philippines than they are in China.]
  • Mayon has experienced more than 50 eruption in 400 years.
  • The first recorded major eruption occurred in 1616.
  • The most voluminous lava flow occurred in the 1766 eruption.
  • Mayon’s most destructive eruption occurred on February 1, 1814. The volcano bombarded the town of Cagsa with tephra, burying all but the bell tower of the town’s church in about 9 m of ash. As many as 2,300 of Albay residents may have perished in the volcano’s deadliest eruption to date.
  • Mayon erupted continuously for 7 days starting June 23, 1897. The village of Bacacay was buried in 15 m of lava. About 500 villagers were killed in the aftermath.

    Fire Earth Moderators believe more volcanic activities at other Philippines volcanoes are highly probable in the near future. The volcanoes located on the island on Mindanao are particularly liable to erupt in the next 12 to 36 months.

    The moderators also believe a large eruption may occur at Taal volcano. For other related forecast, see links below and search blog contents.

    Related Links:

    Posted in lava flow, Mayon, Seismology, volcano, Volcanology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

    Strong Earthquake Strikes Mindanao, Philippines

    Posted by feww on October 4, 2009

    Strong  quake measuring possibly as large as 6.9 strikes Mindanao, Philippines

    Strong earthquake measuring as large as 6.9 Mw struck the seabed in Moro Gulf, Mindanao, Philippine, at a depth of about 630km, on Sunday, October 04, 2009 at 10:58 UTC.

    On September 18, 2009, after a 5.5 Mw quakes struck south of Mindanao, FEWW forecast additional, more powerful earthquakes for the region.

    See: Latest Earthquakes Magnitude 5.5 + for FEWW Forecast.

    10-degree Map Centered at 5°N,125°E

    mindano oct 4-2009
    Earthquake Location Map.
    Source: USGS/EHP. Enhanced by FEWW

    USGS/EHP reported the quake as measuring 6.6Mw.

    Earthquake Details

    • Magnitude:  6.6 [Possibly as large as 6.9Mw – Moderator]
    • Date-Time:
      • Sunday, October 04, 2009 at 10:58:01 UTC
      • Sunday, October 04, 2009 at 06:58:01 PM at epicenter
    • Location:  6.721°N, 123.480°E
    • Depth:  630.5 km (391.8 miles)
    • Region: MORO GULF, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES
    • Distances:
      • 100 km (65 miles) WSW of Cotabato, Mindanao, Philippines
      • 125 km (75 miles) S of Pagadian, Mindanao, Philippines
      • 155 km (95 miles) E of Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines
      • 915 km (570 miles) SSE of MANILA, Philippines
    • Location Uncertainty: horizontal +/- 5.3 km (3.3 miles); depth +/- 7.4 km (4.6 miles)
    • Parameters: NST=124, Nph=124, Dmin=235.2 km, Rmss=0.89 sec, Gp= 32°, M-type=teleseismic moment magnitude (Mw), Version=7
    • Source: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
    • Event ID: us2009mia8

    This event has been reviewed by a seismologist, USGS/EHP said.

    Related Links:

    Recent Human Enhanced Disasters Asia-Pacific

    See also:

    Posted in earthquake forecast, Earthquakes, feww earthquake forecast, Moro Gulf quake, Pagadian earthquake, Zamboanga quake | Tagged: , , , , | 19 Comments »

    Mayon Volcano Ejects Ash

    Posted by feww on August 11, 2008

    Mayon Volcano: ‘undergoing an episode of increased activity’

    Mayon Volcano Advisory – PHIVOLCS

    August 10, 2008 – 12:00 P.M.

    At 9:12 A.M. today, Mayon Volcano manifested mild ash explosion that reached an approximate height of 200 m above the summit crater before drifting east-northeast. The ash-ejection was recorded as explosion-type earthquake which lasted for one minute by the seismic network deployed around the volcano. Immediately after the explosion, visual observation becomes hampered by the thick clouds. During the past weeks, seismic activity had slightly increased and crater glow had slightly intensified. Precise leveling surveys conducted at Mayon from May 10 – 22, 2008 compared to February 17 – March 2, 2008 survey also showed inflation of the volcanic edifice.

    Mayon Volcano overlooks a pastoral scene some five months before the volcano’s violent eruption in September 1984. Ruins from a nearby church destroyed in an 1814 eruption are visible in the foreground. One of the climbing approaches to the 2,462 meter Mayon Volcano begins on the northwest slope near the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology research station. [Credit: Randy C. Bunney. Permission: CC-BY-SA-2.5. Source and Caption: Wikimedia Commons.]


    Pyroclastic flows at Mayon Volcano, Philippines, 1984. Pyroclastic flows descend the south-eastern flank of Mayon Volcano, Philippines. Maximum height of the eruption column was 15 km above sea level, and volcanic ash fell within about 50 km toward the west. There were no casualties from the 1984 eruption because more than 73,000 people evacuated the danger zones as recommended by scientists of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. [Credit: C.G. Newhall, USGS.]


    Mayon Volcano as seen from space. [NASA]
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    The above observations show that Mayon Volcano is undergoing an episode of increased activity probably related to magma movement and post eruptive behavior of the volcano. Although no major eruption is indicated, steam and ash explosions may occur in the following days.
    .

    In view of the above, PHIVOLCS reiterates that Mayon Volcano’s status remains at Alert Level 1. The public, however, is reminded that the 7-km Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) at the southeastern flank of the volcano and the 6-km radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) at other areas remain off-limits due to the continuing threat from sudden small explosions and rockfalls from the upper slopes. Active river channels and those areas perennially identified as lahar-prone around the volcano should be avoided when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. PHIVOLCS is keeping a tight watch over Mayon and shall immediately report any significant development to all concerned.

    Advisory Source: Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS)

    Related Links:

    Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

    Posted in Climate Change, energy, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments »

    Mt. Kurikoma Coughs, Still Comatose!

    Posted by feww on June 18, 2008

    The Year of Volcanoes, Too?

    Steam, hot volcanic plumes rise near Mt. Kurikoma

    Japan’s Self-Defense Forces personnel observed Monday hot volcanic plumes about seven kilometers southwest of the summit of Mt. Kurikoma, a 1,627-meter-high volcano located on the border of Miyagi, Iwate and Akita prefectures, Yomiuri Shimbun reported.

    Aerial observation from a helicopter showed plumes rising from several spots near both Hanayama in Kurihara, and Yu no Hama hot-spring spa.

    Sadato Ueki of Tohoku University’s Research Center for the Prediction of Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions said the plumes might be volcanic gases rising to the surface, or steam coming from underground hot water channels whose course was diverted by the powerful Mw 6.8 quake Saturday. The Iwate quake struck about 22km NW of the Mt. Kurikoma summit.

    “There’s a possibility that volcanic gases that had been confined below ground are gushing out through fissures in the mountain created by the earthquake,” he said. However, he ruled out increased volcanic activity on Mt. Kurikoma, because the plumes were very far from the volcano’s summit.

    Kurikoma volcano last erupted in 1950.

    MT. KURIKOMA is a dormant stratovolcano stretching across three prefectures (states) of Miyagi, Iwate and Akita, standing high at an altitude of 1,627.7m.


    Kurikoma volcano seen from the SSE with its summit at the right-center, the satellitic cone of Daichimori on the left, and Higashi-Kurikoma on the right. On the opposite side of the volcano, the summit is cut by a 4-km-wide caldera breached to the north that is partially filled by the Tsurugi-dake central cone, once mined for sulfur. (Caption: Source) Image Copyright: Shingo Takeuchi (Japanese Quaternary Volcanoes database, RIODB, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/index.htm). See FEWW Fair Use Notice!

    Coordinates: 38° 57′ 0″ N, 140° 46′ 48″ E
    Decimal: 38.95°, 140.78°

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    Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

    Semeru Volcano: Alert Level III

    Posted by feww on May 22, 2008

    Mount Semeru Volcano Restive, Alert Level III

    May 22, 2008

    Jakarta – Indonesian authorities on Thursday urged residents living around the slopes of Mount Semeru in Indonesia’s crowded East Java province to keep their distance from the active volcano, which appears to be heating up.

    Vulcanologists upgraded the alert status of Mount Semeru volcano to level three, one level below a full state of alert, after the 3,676-metre-high volcano on Wednesday sent hot lava as much as 3,000 metres down its slopes.

    Villagers and farmers were urged ‘not to conduct activity at a radius of 4 kilometres from the crater, especially around the south-east of the volcano’s slopes,’ said Surono, head of Indonesia’s Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation at the directorate general of volcanology.

    Surono, who like many Indonesians goes only by one name, appealed to residents living on the riverbanks along three different rivers to be cautious of threats posed by lava streams.

    However, no immediate evacuation is being considered for residents living in a number villages in the potential danger zone, he said, adding that a team of experts is intensively monitoring Mount Semeru’s activity round-the-clock.

    The Mount Semeru volcano, 780 kilometres east of Jakarta, is a popular tourist destination, especially for hikers. Semeru is one of Indonesia’s most active volcanoes.

    The Indonesian archipelago, straddling the seismically active ‘Ring of Fire,’ has the world’s highest density of volcanoes. Of its 500 volcanoes, 128 are active and 65 are listed as dangerous. (Source) Copyright respective author or news agency.

    semeru_eruption_east_java
    The climb to the summit of Semeru is a 2-3 day walk. The mountain stages minor eruptions (like in the photograph) every 20 – 40 minutes. The photo was taken in late afternoon (August 2003) and simply involved walking from the campsite at the base of the climb to the summit around to the west so that the sun was at my back, then waiting for the eruption to start. The most striking aspect of the photo is the colour caused by the almost perpendicular rays of the sun hitting the cloud of dust and steam escaping a couple of thousand metres into the sky from the crater. The photo typifies the fact that Indonesia sits in the middle of the “Ring of Fire”. The many spectacles presented by the landscapes, the festivals and the people of Indonesia never cease to truly amaze me. Photo and caption credit: Campbell Bridge (via Trek Earth at:http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Asia/Indonesia/photo109462.htm)

    Semeru: The Most Active Volcano of Java

    Semeru also Gunung Semeru is the highest and one of most active volcanoes of Java. Known also as Mahameru (Great Mountain), it is very steep and rises abruptly above the coastal plains of eastern Java. Maars containing crater lakes have formed along a line through the summit. Semeru lies at the south end of the Tengger Volcanic Complex. The steep-sided volcano, also referred to as Mahameru (Great Mountain), rises abruptly to 3676 m above coastal plains to the south. Semeru’s eruptive history is extensive. Since 1818, at least 55 eruptions have been recorded (10 of which resulted in fatalities) consisting of both lava flows and pyroclastic flows. More than 500 people have been killed by Semeru’s eruptions during the last 30 years. Semeru has been in almost continuous eruption since 1967. (Source 1 and 2 )


    Semeru is one of many volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Graphic courtesy of Darwin VAAC.


    Semeru, a stratovolcano, has erupted at least 55 times since 1818. The eruptions are commonly moderate to moderately large (VEI of 2 to 3) and explosive. This photo, taken November 4, 1982, shows a small cloud associated with a Strombolian eruption (relatively low-level volcanic eruptions) . Photo by Jack Lockwood, U.S. Geological Survey. (Source)


    Strombolian eruptions are relatively low-level volcanic eruptions, named after the Italian volcano named Stromboli, where such eruptions consist of ejection of incandescent cinder, lapilli and lava bombs to altitudes of tens to hundreds of meters. They are small to medium in volume, with sporadic violence. (Source). Credit: Wolfgang Beyer GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.

    Semeru eruptions are commonly moderate to moderately large (VEI of 2 to 3). Some of the eruptions produced lahars (a type of mudflow composed of pyroclastic material and water that flows down from a volcano). Semeru’s most recent eruption began in 1967 and has continued to the present. In August of 1994, explosions occurred at 15-20 minute intervals. In February of 1995, pyroclastic avalanches traveled about 0.6 mile (1 km) from the summit.


    Semeru, 1985. A USGS Photo.

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    Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

    Philippines Taal Volcano Could Erupt Anytime!

    Posted by feww on May 19, 2008

    UPDATE: Latest From TAAL and other Philippines Volcanoes

    Taal May Erupt at Anytime

    FEWW team believes there is a strong probability that the Taal Volcano, a Pelean-type active volcano on the island of Luzon, might erupt this month. Taal volcano is designated as one of the 16 Decade Volcanoes by International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI). Located about 50 km south of the capital, Manila, Taal is surrounded by populated areas.

    Taal has erupted violently several times (the last eruption was in 1977). The current death toll caused by its activities stands at about 6,000.

    More seismic activities in the region should be expected.


    Taal Volcano Seen through Lake Taal (Photo: Jhun Taboga)


    A cinder cone in an acidic lake on Taal Volcano (Credit: JG Moore of the US Geological Survey)


    Major volcanoes of the Philippines

    Pacific Ring of Fire


    The Pacific Ring of Fire is an area of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions encircling the basin of the Pacific Ocean. The Ring of Fire has 452 volcanoes and is home to over 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes. Ninety percent of the world’s earthquakes and 80% of the world’s largest earthquakes occur along the Ring of Fire. The Ring of Fire is a direct result and consequence of plate tectonics and the movement and collisions of crustal plates. (Source)

    Plate Tectonics


    World’s 14 major tectonic plates plus the Scotia plate. Mapped in the second half of the 20th century to explain the observed evidence for large scale motions of the Earth’s lithosphere. The lithosphere is broken up into tectonic plates. The surface of the Earth consists of a further 38 [40] minor plates.

    The largest of the major plates are

    • African Plate, containing Africa – Continental plate
    • Antarctic Plate, containing Antarctica – Continental plate
    • Australian Plate, containing Australia (fused with Indian Plate about 50 million years ago) – Continental plate
    • Eurasian Plate containing Asia and Europe – Continental plate
    • North American Plate containing North America and north-east Siberia – Continental plate
    • South American Plate containing South America – Continental plate
    • Pacific Plate, covering the Pacific Ocean – Oceanic plate

    See also

    Earthquakes, volcanic activity, mountain-building, and oceanic trench formation occur along plate boundaries. The lateral movement of the plates is typically at speeds of 5 – 10 cm/yr. (Read more …)

    Recent Earthquakes [Kurile through Kermadec trenches]

    [Time at epicenter]

    • Magnitude 4.8; Depth of 48.7 km; SOUTHEAST OF THE LOYALTY ISLANDS; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 10:03:52 PM
    • Magnitude 5.6; Depth of 35 km; SOUTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA; May 18, 2008 at 07:17:24 PM
    • Magnitude 4.6; Depth of 74.1km; MINDORO, PHILIPPINES; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 07:24:17 PM
    • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 10 km; SABAH, MALAYSIA; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 02:26:41 PM
    • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 31.3 km; NIAS REGION, INDONESIA; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 09:59:59 AM
    • Magnitude 4.4; Depth of 242.4 km;KYUSHU, JAPAN; Sunday, May 18, 2008 at 07:15:06 AM
    • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 127.1 km, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES, Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 10:17:30 PM
    • Magnitude 5.1; Depth of 151.2 km; SOUTH OF THE KERMADEC ISLANDS; Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 02:23:17 PM
    • Magnitude 5.3; Depth of 150.4 km; NEW BRITAIN REGION, PAPUA NEW GUINEA; Saturday, May 17, 2008 at 03:35:14 AM
    • Magnitude 5.4; Depth of 35 km; SOUTH OF THE KERMADEC ISLANDS; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 11:06:51 PM
    • Magnitude 5.3; Depth of 41 km; SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS REGION; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 09:19:07 AM
    • Magnitude 4.9; Depth of 606.3 km; FIJI REGION; Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 10:46:02 AM
    • Magnitude 5.1; Depth of 35 km; TONGA; Friday, May 16, 2008 at 03:06:15 AM
    • Magnitude 5.0; Depth of 25.8 km; KURIL ISLANDS; Wednesday, May 14, 2008 at 08:20:43 AM
    • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 52.5 km; LUZON, PHILIPPINES; Wednesday, May 14, 2008 at 05:48:32 AM
    • Magnitude 5.2; Depth of 40.8 km; LUZON, PHILIPPINES; Depth of 40.8 km; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 10:14:30 PM
    • Magnitude 5.4; Depth of 35 km; NORTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 05:29:19 PM
    • Magnitude 5.0; Depth of 36.7 km; TAIWAN REGION; Tuesday, May 13, 2008 at 06:57:46 AM
    • Magnitude 4.6; Depth of 509 km; SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS; Monday, May 12, 2008 at 04:34:05 AM

    [Source: USGS]

    Global earthquake epicentres, 1963–1998 (Image: NASA)

    Philippines Other Major Volcanoes: Mayon Volcano


    Mayon Volcano as viewed from Lingñon Hill in Daraga, Albay. Mayon, located between the Eurasian and the Philippine Plate, is a convergent plate boundary. It is the most active volcano in the Philippines, having erupted over 47 times in the past 400 years. Last eruption: 2006. (Copyrigh by Tam3rd via Wikimedia)

    Canlaon Volcano


    Canlaon, a stratovolcano, is located in the north central part of the island of Negros.
    Last eruption: 2006.

    Weather clouds drape the sparsely vegetated summit of Kanlaon volcano (also spelled Canlaon). Kanlaon is the most active of the central Philippines and forms the highest point on the island of Negros. The massive 2435-m-high stratovolcano is dotted with fissure-controlled pyroclastic cones and craters, many of which are filled by lakes. Historical eruptions, recorded since 1866, have typically consisted of phreatic explosions of small-to-moderate size that produce minor ashfalls near the volcano. Photo courtesy of PHIVOLCS. Caption GVP

    Ragang volcano


    Ragang volcano (above and to the right of the center of image) is located in central Mindanao. Last eruption: 1916. Thanks mainly to the Filipino government and its education authorities, no other image of Ragnag Volcano could be found at the time of writing. NASA Space Shuttle image STS61A-40-71, 1985 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).

    There are 22 active volcanoes in the Philippines: Babuyan Claro, Banahaw, Bulusan, Mount Biliran, Bud Dajo, Cagua, Camiguin de Babuyanes, Didicas, Hibok-Hibok, Iraya, Mount Iriga, Mount Kanlaon, Leonard Kniaseff, Makaturing, Matutum, Mayon, Musuan, Mount Parker (Cotabato), Pinatubo, Ragang, Smith Volcano, Taal.

    See also: List of volcanoes in the Philippines

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    Posted in Climate Change, environment, food, health, Tourism, Travel | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments »