Fire Earth

Earth is fighting to stay alive. Mass dieoffs, triggered by anthropogenic assault and fallout of planetary defense systems offsetting the impact, could begin anytime!

Posts Tagged ‘quake death toll’

Chile Lowers Quake Death Toll to 279

Posted by feww on March 5, 2010

ANYTHING is possible in CHILE

How did the Government Count the Dead in Round One?

There’s a time-honored convention, a simple mathematical algorithm for counting things like dead bodies. You look at them, record them in some way and count them.

Only a day or so ago Chilean government put the number of the dead from the M8.8 mega quake and the giant tsunami waves that occurred on Saturday at 802. And the number of missing at about 1,000.

Chilean authorities have sharply lowered the daeth toll 20 279, Reuters reported.

The government did not say whether the new figure could be subject to future downsizing, again.

They haven’t given any explanation, of course, save for a mention in passing that the previous toll had included the number of missing [sic.]

Could it be that the government is in denial because they know they could have at least saved the lives of the tsunami victims?

Fire-Earth is lowering its estimate for the HAITI Quake Disaster from 20,000 dead and injured to less than 5,000 (five thousand). The Moderators would reconsider this estimate if a shred of evidence could be produced.

Another Powerful Aftershock Strikes

Meanwhile, another powerful aftershock measuring up to 6.5Mw struck Antofagasta, Chile about 1,260km north of the capital, Santiago.

The epicenter of the aftershock, which struck at a depth of about 100km, was located at 22.330°S, 68.340°W, USGS/EHP reported.

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Italy Quake Update

Posted by feww on April 8, 2009

Magnitude 5.6 aftershock, largest to date, strikes central Italy

The quake area has so far experienced about 200 tremors, a half dozen or so of the which measured 4+ Mw. The largest aftreshock to follow the mainshock that struck near L’Aquila, central Italy, early Monday measured 5.6Mw, centered at 42.349°N, 13.405°E at a depth of about 13km, about 90 km NE of Rome, according to USGS-EHP (event id: us2009fdbl).


Hospital patients rest outdoors after an earthquake caused the collapse of St. Salvatore Hospital in Aquila April 6, 2009. REUTERS/Giampiero Sposito. Image may be subject to copyright.

  • Largest aftershock to strike the quake area measured 5.6Mw.
  • Monday Quake death toll has so far risen to about 250.
  • Local official say about one thousand people were injured, 100 of them seriously (12 critically).
  • The government estimates the reconstruction would cost 1.2 billion euros (~ $1.6 billion).
  • Billionaire Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi disagrees and stresses that the cost would be “several billion euros.”
  • Up to 50,000 people are thought to become homeless.
  • About 17,000 people have already lost their homes, or were unable to return to their homes.
  • The earthquake damaged or destroyed up to 15,000 buildings in 26 cities, towns and villages around L’Aquila including the towns of Onna and Paganica, officials said.
  • Overnight temperatures fell to 4°C in L’Aquila, felling near freezing at higher altitudes.


Nuns walk past a collapsed house in Onna, a small town some 10km (six miles) from L’Aquila, the epicentre of the quake. A violent earthquake jolted central Italy killing at least 92 people and injuring 1,500 as buildings and homes in a walled medieval town were reduced to rubble. Photo: Vincenzo Pinto/ AFP. Source: France 24. Image may be subject to copyright.

FEWW Forecast:  FEWW has forecast a powerful quake to strike central Italy 2009-10, which would likely measure 6.9Mw. Details would be posted on this blog at the appropriate time.

Earthquake in Central Italy

A magnitude 6.3 earthquake hit central Italy on April 6, 2009, killing at least 91 people, and leaving tens of thousands homeless. The government declared a state of emergency, while thousands of rescuers searched for survivors through the rubble of buildings and houses in the medieval city of L’Aquila and nearby small towns.

This image of central Italy shows the rugged topography in the vicinity of L’Aquila, the town closest to the epicenter (largest circle) of the quake. The map is based on data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which flew on the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. Lower elevations are shown in green, while higher elevations are light brown and off-white. The direction of the mountain slopes is indicated by shading. Steep, northwest-facing slopes are brightest, while steep, southeast-facing slopes are darkest.

L’Aquila is nestled in the central Apennine Mountains, which run the length of Italy like a spine. The mountains are crisscrossed by dozens of faults, or cracks in the Earth’s crust. The earthquake appears to have occurred along one of the faults in this area. Faults are not always visible at the surface, but in this part of the Apennines, many of them are revealed by steeply sloped fault scarps (bluffs or cliffs that trace the path of the underground fracture). A major fault system is revealed by a scarp running north-northwest from the Focino Plain nearly to L’Aquila, passing along the eastern foothills of Mt. Velino and Mt. Ocre. L’Aquila is wedged between a pair of parallel faults running toward the northwest and a long, broken fault extending toward the east. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using SRTM data provided courtesy of the University of Maryland’s Global Land Cover Facility. Caption by Rebecca Lindsey. Instrument: Space Shuttle – SRTM. Image acquired April 6, 2009.

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Posted in Italy quake, Italy quake Forecast, L'Aquila quake, ONNA, quake homeless | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Images of the deadly quake near Rome

Posted by feww on April 6, 2009

Quake death toll  may reach hundreds, with several thousand others injured and up to 50,000 people left homeless


A man walks on debris as he looks for his relatives after an earthquake, in downtown Aquila April 6, 2009. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi. Image may be subject to copyright.


Rescuers sift through the wreckage of a house after an earthquake in the Italian village of Onna April 6, 2009. REUTERS/Chris Helgren. Image may be subject to copyright.


An Italian military carabinieri walks on debris past destroyed buildings after an earthquake, in downtown Aquila April 6, 2009. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi. Image may be subject to copyright.


An Italian police officer walks through the rubble after an earthquake in the Italian village of Onna April 6, 2009. REUTERS/Chris Helgren. Image may be subject to copyright.


L’Aquila’s main hospital was itself damaged by the quake, and only two operating rooms were working. Health officials were trying to set up a field hospital outside. Photo: Timesonline. Image may be subject to copyright.


The body of a victim lies on the street on in front of his collapsed house in L’Aquila, a medieval city in the Apennine mountains 70 miles north of Rome.  (Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty). Image may be subject to copyright.


The homeless carried whatever they had managed to grab as they ran onto the streets – pets in cages, suitcases stuffed with treasured possessions, even pictures from the wall. (Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty). Image may be subject to copyright.


Civil protection officials said that they would have to find shelter for thousands of people in the coming days. (Pier Paolo Cito/AP). Image may be subject to copyright.

A History of Earthquakes in Italy since 1857  (From Timesonline ).

  • 1857   Several towns destroyed and 12,000 people killed in the Basilicata region south of Naples by tremors estimated at around 6.9 on the Richter scale – dubbed the Great Neapolitan Earthquake
  • 1905  Around 5,000 die when tremors wipe out 25 villages in Calabria
  • 1908  Europe’s most powerful earthquake leaves more than 82,000 people dead as tremors measured at up to 7.5 on the Richter scale hit the Messina Strait between Sicily and the Italian mainland, causing a tsunami
  • 1915  The town of Avezzano in southern Italy is destroyed by an earthquake, with the loss of about 32,600 lives
  • 1930  Around 1,400 people die in the Irpinia region of southern Italy in a quake measured at 6.5
  • 1976  A total of 976 die and 70,000 people are left homeless when a tremor measuring 6.1 on the Richter scale strikes Friuli in north-eastern Italy
  • 1980  A quake strikes the town of Eboli, south of Naples, killing 2,735 people and injuring 7,500
  • 1997  Two earthquakes in Umbria in September leave 13 dead and more than 40,000 people homeless. Four of the victims were killed when the roof of the Basilica of St Francis collapsed in Assisi, damaging priceless frescoes
  • 2001  One woman dies in the northern Italian region of Alto Adige, during a quake measuring 5.2
  • 2002  Thirty people, most of them children crushed in their collapsed school, die in San Giuliano di Puglia in southern Italy during an earthquake in October measured at 5.9 on the Richter scale.

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