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Posts Tagged ‘Redoubt Activity’

Redoubt Update: March 31, 2009

Posted by feww on March 31, 2009

Redoubt Activity – Color Code RED : Alert Level WARNING

Date Time :  March 31, 2009 1330 UTC/ March 31, 2009 0530 AKDT

On 2009-03-31 at 05:28:55 AKDT AVO reported:

Seismicity at the volcano has been low, but remains above background level. Weak tremor and small discrete earthquakes have been observed in the past hour.

Latest Images from AVO


Photograph of impact from the volcanic ash fall out in Nikiski, AK from Redoubt volcano. This plume was generated during the March 28, 15:29 AKDT, 2009 event, and ash fall began at approximately 16:16 AKDT and lasted maybe 5 minutes. Fine ash is resuspended as vehicles drive over the recently deposited ash fall deposit. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 16:45:00 AKDT. Image Creator:  Kristi
Wallace. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS. [Image added March31, 2009]


Photograph of Redoubt Volcano in eruption taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. View is to the east. Continuous emission of volcanic gas, water vapor, and ash is producing a plume rising to about 15,000 feet above sea level. The haze at left below the drifting cloud is a region of active ash fall. AVO scientists observed ash falling up to 25 miles downwind. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.
[Image added March31, 2009]


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Looking east / southeast down into the upper crater rim of Redoubt Volcano.
Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator:  Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT.  Looking at the north flank of Redoubt Volcano.
Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT.
Looking east at Redoubt Volcano. Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


Photograph taken during observation and gas data collection flight on March 30, 2009. Picture Date: March 30, 2009 AKDT.  Looking at the north flank of Redoubt Volcano.
Image Creator: Heather Bleick. Image courtesy of AVO/USGS.


BSE image showing groundmass, with glass, plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide microlites. The scale bar is absent here, but the image was collected at 400 X, compared with 100 X from image 17485 [SEE BELOW.]  Picture Date: March 30, 2009. Image Creator: Jessica Larsen.  Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.


BSE image showing amphibole grain with reaction rim in sample AT-1605. Image Creator: Jessica Larsen.  Image courtesy of the AVO/UAF-GI.


Redoubt 15:29 eruption, 3/28/2009. Picture Date: March 28, 2009 AKDT. Image Creator: Tricia Joy Sadler. Image courtesy of the photographer.


Photograph of lightning from Redoubt’s 1:20 am March 28 eruption, courtesy of Bretwood Higman. Picture Date: March 28, 2009. Image Creator: Bretwood Higman. Image courtesy of Bretwood Higman.

For background information and selection of previous images see:

Posted in Alaska volcanoes, Anchorage, ashfall, redoubt eruption, volcanism | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

60 pct Chance Redoubt May Erupt

Posted by feww on March 18, 2009

Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations

Local time: March 17, 2009 1705 AKDT (March 18, 2009 0105 UTC)
At 2009-03-17 16:30:56 AKDT AVO Reported:

Seismic activity low and marked by small discrete earthquakes. Partly cloudy satellite and HutCam views show no sign of activity.


View of Redoubt steaming on March 15, 2009, taken by David Wartinbee, from Soldotna, AK.
via AVO. Image courtesy of the photographer.

Current Status and Observations [Mirrored from AVO]

Seismic activity at Mount Redoubt increased at about 1:05 AKDT Sunday afternoon (March 15, 2009) and approximately 4 hours of continuous volcanic tremor ensued. The onset of the tremor was associated with a small explosion that produced a plume of gas and ash that rose to about 15,000 feet above sea level and deposited a trace amount of ash over the summit-crater floor and down the south flank of the volcano to about 3,000 feet. AVO responded to this increase in activity by raising the color code and alert level to ORANGE/WATCH at 2:50 PM AKDT. At this time it does not appear that the increase in activity heralds a significant eruption in the short term, but conditions may evolve rapidly.

An AVO overflight Sunday witnessed activity from 11:30 AM until about 3:00 PM and was able to document ash emission from a new vent, just south of the 1990 lava dome and west of the prominent ice collapse feature near the north edge of the summit crater. Although ash emission was short lived, it represents the first documented ash fall during the current episode of unrest at Mount Redoubt.

About twenty minutes after the initial steam and ash burst, a sediment-laden flow occurred from a small area in the ice at about 7000 feet on upper Drift glacier. This flow descended about 1500 feet and produced a distinctive seismic signature seen across the Redoubt network.

Although the intent of the overflight was make airborne gas measurements, only a few such measurements were possible due to the uncertain nature of the activity and potential for further ash emission. The measurements that were made indicated at least a qualitative increase in SO2 emission relative to levels measured previously. The gas data are currently being processed and will be available soon.


Photograph taken during observation / gas data collection flight to Redoubt Volcano on March 15, 2009 [
13:10:28 AKDT] Image Creator: Bill Burton; courtesy of AVO/USGS.

Interpretation of New Activity and Possible Outcomes
Although preliminary, it is likely that the plume observed just after 1:00 PM AKDT on Sunday, March 15, 2009 was produced by a steam explosion in the shallow hydrothermal system of the volcano. Without examination of the ash we cannot say with certainty if the ash represents new magma or if it is merely pulverized old material from the surface of the volcano.

Steam-driven explosions are not unexpected events at Redoubt given the amount of heat that is being released at the surface. It is possible that more such explosions can occur with little or no warning. It is possible that these plumes can reach above 20,000 feet, and may contain minor amounts of fine ash.

Relatively rapid increases in seismic activity, and an overall waxing and waning pattern to the seismicity at Redoubt may persist for weeks to months. Increases in seismicity may or may not be associated with other volcanic phenomena, such as minor ash emission, and vigorous steaming. The burst of activity at Redoubt on March 15, 2009 indicates that the volcano is still in a restless condition.

AVO plans to visit Redoubt later this week to attempt collection of ash samples, retrieve GPS data and do some routine maintenance of seismic and other equipment.

AVO has resumed 24 hour per day staffing of the AVO operations center in Anchorage. http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Redoubt.php


Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano and its reflection in the waters of Cook Inlet. View is to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. Photograph by J. Warren, April 21, 1990. Source: AVO

FEWW believes there’s a 60 percent probability Redoubt Volcano may erupt violently this year, possibly by July 2009.


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Posted in eismicity at Redoubt, hydrothermal system, Mount Redoubt, SO2 emission, steam explosion | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Alaska’s Redoubt May Be About to Erupt

Posted by feww on February 1, 2009

Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

AVO Report on 2009-01-31  at 22:41:24 [Local Time]

Seismicity remained above background. No new episodes of tremor have been detected in the last two hours.

Oblique photo of Redoubt Volcano taken during an observation flight. Fumarolic activity on the north side of the volcano is associated with the most recent unrest at Redoubt Volcano. View from the south. Picture Date: January 30, 2009 AKST – Image Creator:  Kristi Wallace – Image courtesy of AVO/USGS

Observers from the gas/observation flight today report continued melting at the summit area. Holes in the ice continue to grow exposing more steaming rock. Volcanic gases continue to be detected. Web camera views are currently dark. EoR

A rapidly growing fumarole

Geologists detected a hole in the glacier covering the north side of the Mount Redoubt volcano on Friday. The hole doubled in size within hours, currently estimated at about several acres in size.

location-of-redoubt-volcanoLocation of Redoubt volcano, in relationship to surrounding towns, roads, and other volcanoes. Picture Date: September 26, 2008 – Image Creator:  Janet Schaefer. Image courtesy of the AVO/ADGGS.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory researchers flew close to Drift Glacier and observed  vigorous steam emitted from the hole.  They confirmed Saturday the hole was a fumarole which was rapidly growing larger.

Based on the report, an eruption could occur. Redoubt last erupted in 1990.

AVO has  been recording minor quakes, however,  the frequency of these quakes are lower than the seismic activity that  preceded the last two eruptions in 1989 and 1990.

“We’re looking for an increase of seismicity to match the precursor activity, [however,]  we haven’t seen that yet.” AVO research geologist Kristi Wallace said.

[Note: A fumarole  is an opening in Earth’s  crust, usually near volcanoes, which emits steam and gases including carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid.]

FEWW Forecast: An area within approximately 300-km radius of Anchorage would be one of the seismic zones in Alaska to experience continued intense seismic activity this year possibly including a magnitude MW 7.9 or larger quake close to Anchorage  (south of the city, north of Rugged Island).

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Posted in Alaska Volcano Observatory, Anchorage, Drift glacier, Fourpeaked Glacier, usgs | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »