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Posts Tagged ‘Sarychev Peak’

VolcanoWatch Weekly [3 Dec 2009]

Posted by feww on December 3, 2009

SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(25 November – 1 December 2009)

New activity/Unrest:

FEWW JUNE 2009 FORECAST:

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

The Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory reported that a large explosion from Gaua’s Mount Garat on 18 November was followed by high dense ash plumes. An explosion that caused ashfall in inhabited areas on 26 November prompted the evacuation of more than 300 people.

MVO reported that during 20-27 November activity from the Soufrière Hills lava dome continued at a high level; lava extrusion shifted from the W side of the lava dome to the summit region. On 24 November there was a period of 120 minutes of continuous pyroclastic flow activity, followed by 90 minutes of semi-continuous activity. On 26 November, a pyroclastic flow that descended the Tar River valley was caused by collapse of part of the old, pre-2009 lava dome.

Ongoing Activity:

Chaitén, Southern Chile; Dukono, Halmahera (Indonesia);  Fuego, Guatemala; Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia); Kilauea, Hawaii;  Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia); Nevado del Huila, Colombia;  Rabaul, New Britain; Sakura-jima, Kyushu (Japan);  Sangay, Ecuador; Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia); Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan).

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Posted in volcanic eruption, volcanic hazard, volcanism, volcano, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [30 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 30, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 22 July – 28 July 2009

VOW: Batu Tara

batu tara July 27 2009
Batu Tara remained active in late July 2009. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this photo-like image the volcano releasing a faint plume on July 27, 2009. The distinct segments of the plume suggest that the volcano has released ash and/or steam in pulses. The plume blows toward the northwest over the Flores Sea.  NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

batutara EO 18 may 2009
Batu Tara remained active in mid-May 2009. On May 17, 2009, as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image, the tiny volcanic island released a plume of ash and/or steam. The volcano’s plume forms a counter-clockwise arc north of the volcano. East of that plume is another, fainter plume, almost certainly of the same origin, blowing westward over the Flores Sea. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

New activity/unrest:

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

Notes:

KVERT reported that during 17-18 and 20-24 July seismic activity from Shiveluch was above background levels. According to news sources, an ash plume rose to an altitude of 7 km (23,000 ft) a.s.l. late on 25 July. Increased seismicity, powerful ash bursts, and avalanches were also reported.

Based on information from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 22 July explosions from Sakura-jima produced plumes that rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE. On 23 July and 27 July pilots observed ash plumes. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

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Posted in Global Volcanism, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanism, Volcano Hazard, volcanoes, VolcanoWatch | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [9 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 9, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 1 July – 8 July 2009

Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

NOTES: A large sulfur dioxide plume and several thermal anomalies from Manda Hararo were detected in satellite imagery during 28-30 June. On 8 July, a scientist that visited the area reported fresh lava flows, an eruptive fissure that was about 5 km long, and gas emitting from multiple cones.

According to news articles, PHIVOLCS implemented increased monitoring of Mayon after a recent rise in seismicity. Incandescence in the crater and a slight increase in sulfur dioxide gas output over background levels were also noted. (Source: GVP)

MANDA HARARO Northeastern Africa 12.17°N, 40.82°E; summit elev. 600+ m


Steam rises from new fissures that fed lava flows at the Manda Hararo complex, as seen on August 20, 2007. The Manda Hararo complex is the southernmost axial range of western Afar. The massive complex is 105 km long and 20-30 km wide, and represents an uplifted segment of a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. Voluminous fluid lava flows issued from NNW-trending fissures of the Ethiopian rift. Photo courtesy of Gezahegn Yirgu, 2007 (Addis Ababa University). Caption: GVP.

A large sulfur dioxide plume and several thermal anomalies from Manda Hararo were detected in satellite imagery during 28-30 June. Thermal anomalies detected in satellite imagery indicated a surface lava flow in the Karbahi region. Karbahi is a graben area with numerous active faults, fissures, and basalt flows, NW of the center of the broad Manda Hararo volcanic complex. Preliminary data suggested that the eruption was larger than the previous eruption in August 2007. On 8 July, a scientist that visited the area reported fresh lava flows, an eruptive fissure that was about 5 km long, and gas emitting from multiple cones.


A steaming volcanic vent in the Afar desert. The black basalt rock erupted onto the surface on 28 June and now covers an area of 10 square kilometres. Photograph: Talfan Barnie, University of Cambridge via Guardian Science Blog. Image may be subject to copyright.

Geologic Summary. The southernmost axial range of western Afar, the Manda Hararo complex is located in the Kalo plain, SSE of Dabbahu volcano. The massive complex is 105 km long and 20-30 km wide, and represents an uplifted segment of a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. A small basaltic shield volcano is located at the northern end of the complex, south of which is an area of abundant fissure-fed lava flows. Two basaltic shield volcanoes, the largest of which is Unda Hararo, occupy the center of the complex. The dominant part of the complex lies to the south, where the Gumatmali-Gablaytu fissure system is located. Voluminous fluid lava flows issued from these NNW-trending fissures, and solidified lava lakes occupy two large craters. Lava flows from the Gablaytu and Manda shield volcanoes overlie 8000-year-old sediments. Hot springs and fumaroles occur around Daorre lake. The first historical eruption from Manda Hararo produced fissure-fed lava flows in 2007. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates

Alaska Volcano Observatory Update: July 09, 2009 0105 UTC

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

  • Cleveland Activity – Color Code – YELLOW : Alert Level – ADVISORY

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE: Wednesday, July 8, 2009  18:14 UTC

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

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Posted in Chaiten, Sakura-jima, Shiveluch, Ubinas, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sarychev Peak Before and After Images

Posted by feww on July 5, 2009

Before and after images show impact of  the Sarychev Peak Volcano eruption on Matua Island.

Ostrov Matua, Kuril Islands

sarychev_ast_2009181
Image dated June 30, 2009

sarychev_ast_2007146
Image dated
May 26, 2007

Acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite, these images of Ostrov Matua show the island shortly after the eruption on June 30, 2009 (top), and two years before on May 26, 2007 (bottom).

In these false-color images, vegetation appears red, water appears dark blue, and clouds, water vapor and ice all appear white. Volcanic rock, including old lava flows and debris from the recent eruption, ranges from gray to dark brown.

The most striking difference between these two images is the gray coating on the northwestern half of the island in June 2009. While vegetation on the rest of the island appears lush, volcanic debris—probably a mixture of pyroclastic flows and settled ash—covered virtually all the vegetation on the northwestern end. A close look at the top image also reveals that the recent volcanic activity appears to have expanded the island’s coastline on the northwestern end.

Another difference between the images relates to snow cover. In the image from May 2007, snow spreads over much of the island, although the snow alternates with snow-free ground. The vegetation is pinkish-gray, suggesting the spring thaw is still underway. The complete lack of snow in 2009 may result from a combination of a difference in season and volcanic activity having melted or covered any lingering snow.

NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Michon Scott.

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Posted in active volcanoes, Earth’s Energy Budget, Sarychev Peak photos, volcanism, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [2 July 2009]

Posted by feww on July 3, 2009

VoW: Yellowstone Volcano

Location: 44.43°N 110.67°W
Summit Elevation:  2,805 m
Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Yellowstone
Remote sensor imagery of Yellowstone Caldera. Source: a frame-freeze picture from Yellowstone Volcano Due To Erupt


The rim of the Yellowstone Caldera.  Source ESA (mirrored from http://www.yellowstonegis.utah.edu/home/home.html)

What’s brewing under the old rocks?

  • Earthquake swarms are common at Yellowstone.
  • Increased seismic activity at Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park  in late December 2008 decreasing  since January 8, 2009.
  • Seismic activity  could continue.
  • The recent swarm is well above typical activity at Yellowstone, but  not unprecedented.
  • Earthquake swarms within the Yellowstone caldera typically occur with magnitudes of about 4.0.
  • A swarm with about 3,000 events occurred in 1985 on the northwest rim of the caldera, lasting for three months, with largest earthquakes up to M4.9  recorded. (Source: Volcanoes USGS )


Yellowstone Lake showing location and times of the recent earthquakes from Dec. 27, 2008 (blue) to Jan. 8, 2009 (red). The M 3.0 and greater earthquakes are shown as stars, the smaller earthquakes are shown as circles. During the swarm, the earthquake locations appear to have moved north. For more information on the depths of the earthquakes, see the cross section from X to X’ below.
(Source: Volcanoes USGS/ YVO )


The depth versus location of the Yellowstone Lake earthquake swarm from X to X’ on the Yellowstone Lake map. Earthquakes are shown from Dec. 27, 2008 (blue) to
Jan. 8, 2009 (red). The M 3.0 and greater earthquakes are shown as stars, the smaller earthquakes are shown as circles.  (Source: Volcanoes USGS
/ YVO )


Number of reviewed Yellowstone Lake earthquakes in six-hour and three-hour intervals from 12/27/08 to 01/06/09. The green line on the left figure gives the cumulative
number of earthquakes; the steep slopes correspond to increase in earthquake number. The red line in the figure on the right gives the cumulative moment, or energy; its sharp increase in the first few days is due to a greater number of large earthquakes with their greater energy release. The total cumulative moment is equivalent in energy to about one M 4.5 earthquake. Click on the image for a full-size version.
(Source: Volcanoes USGS/ YVO )

What causes earthquakes at Yellowstone?

USGS / YVO cite a combination of geological factors including:

  • Regional stress associated with normal faults such as the nearby Teton and Hebgen Lake faults
  • Magmatic movements at depth (>7 kms)
  • Hydrothermal fluid activity caused by boiling groundwater which is heated by magma.

However,  YVO has not reported any anomalous changes in hot springs discharges, gas emissions …

In 2004 the Yellowstone caldera underwent period of accelerated uplift, clocking 7 cm/yr, or three times  faster than  in the recorded history; however the movement has now slowed down to  a maximum rate of 4 cm/yr (or about 175 % of the pre-2004 records.)

The uplift is most noticeable at the White Lake GPS station, as has been discussed in our monthly YVO updates during the past year. As of late October 2007, the total uplift since 2004 at that location is about 17 cm. Chang and his colleagues credit the relatively rapid rise to recharge of magma into the giant magma chamber that underlies the Yellowstone Caldera. They also used numerical modeling to infer that the magma intruded about 10 km (6 miles) beneath the surface.


This interferogram provides a map view of ground movements at Yellowstone. Each color contour represents a line of equal uplift relative to the ENVISAT satellite between Sept. 2004 and Aug. 2006. The center of the uplift is an elliptical region stretching from the northeastern part of the Yellowstone Caldera (the dashed black line) to the southwest. This area of maximum uplift encompasses both Yellowstone’s resurgent domes, features long known for similar movements. During this time period, the north-rim uplift anomaly subsided (bullseye in the upper left part of the interferogram). The yellow lines are roads. The yellow triangles are locations of GPS stations with continuous data. The light blue lake within the caldera is Yellowstone Lake. Thin black lines are mapped faults. Figure courtesy of C. Wicks, USGS. Caption: USGS / YVO


Yellowstone caldera Map. USGS   Click Image to Enlarge.


Source: USGS


Source: Yellowstone National Park.

Conclusion:

USGS / YVO: “At this time, there is no reason to believe that magma has risen to a shallow level within the crust or that a volcanic eruption is likely. ”

FEWW: Perhaps, a new mindset is needed to help understand the true nature, “utility function” and full range of  all possible scenarios that might occur at the super volcano site. Let’s start looking at Yellowstone in the Big Picture frame.  There may be a few sobering “surprises” in store!


Volcanic Activity Report: 24 June-30 June 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

NOTE: A small explosive eruption of Cleveland on 25 June prompted AVO to raise the Volcano Alert Level to Watch and the Aviation Color Code to Orange. An ash cloud that detached from the volcano was seen on satellite imagery moving S at an estimated altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. No further activity was reported. On 27 June, AVO lowered the Volcano Alert Level to Advisory and the Aviation Color Code to Yellow. (Source: GVP)

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for July 03, 2009 0040 UTC

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Cleveland Activity – Color Code – YELLOW : Alert Level – ADVISORY

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations: Local time: June 24, 2009 1705 AKDT (June 25, 2009 0105 UTC)
The eruption of Redoubt continues. Seismic activity remains low but above background levels.

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Posted in Kīlauea, volcanism, Volcano Hazards, Volcano Status, volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

How Sarychev Peak Moved from Russia to Japan!

Posted by feww on June 25, 2009

Better late than never mate, goes the Australian saying

As for the reporting accuracy, close but no shrimps!

better late than never mate
Sarychev Volcano moved to Japan (!) See section underlined in red.
A condensed screen dump of the news URL at Australia‘s Melbourne Herald Sun site http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,25688161-24331,00.html

Even the Aussies should be entitled to accurate, prompt reporting!

Heaven knows we have criticized Earth Observatory often enough for holding on to images of public interest instead of releasing them instantly on Internet.  However it took the Australian broadcaster nearly two weeks and a major political shift, taking the Sarychev Peak out of the hands of Russians and handing it over to the Japanese, to report the eruption.

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Posted in reporting accuracy, Sarychev activity, Sarychev Peak erupted, volcanic eruption, volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [25 June 2009]

Posted by feww on June 25, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report:  17 June – 23 June 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Notes:

The eruption from Sarychev Peak that began on 11 June continued through the 19th. Another explosive eruption on 15 June was followed by a plume that extended 360 km NW. Ash clouds from earlier explosions reached 13.7 km (45,000 feet) altitude. Ash emissions continued during 17-18 June.

During 21 June ash plumes from Rinjani rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) and drifted 55 km N. (Source: GVP)

Volcano of the Week: Rabaul Caldera

Rabaul caldera, named after the town of Rabaul (town is built inside the caldera), is a large volcano in East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. Its Tavurvur  and Vulcan cones erupted in 1994, devastating Rabaul and killing about a dozen people. It’s 1937 eruption killed more than 500 people.

Country: Papua New Guinea
Geographical region: New Britain
Volcano Type: Pyroclastic shield
Last Known Eruption: 2009 (continuing)
Summit Elevation: 688 m  (2,257 feet)
Latitude: 4.271°S  (4°16’15″S)
Longitude: 152.203°E  (152°12’10″E)
Source: Global Volcanism Program (GVP)


Tavurvur volcano – part of Rabaul Caldera –– Papua New Guinea. Image Credit and Licensing details.

rabaul_amo_2009093
Rabaul Volcano on the northeastern end of New Britain captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite on April 3, 2009 releasing plumes of volcanic ash and steam. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid (!) Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.


The low-lying Rabaul caldera on the tip of the Gazelle Peninsula at the NE end of New Britain forms a broad sheltered harbor utilized by what was the island’s largest city prior to a major eruption in 1994. The outer flanks of the 688-m-high asymmetrical pyroclastic shield volcano are formed by thick pyroclastic-flow deposits. The 8 x 14 km caldera is widely breached on the east, where its floor is flooded by Blanche Bay and was formed about 1400 years ago. An earlier caldera-forming eruption about 7100 years ago is now considered to have originated from Tavui caldera, offshore to the north. Three small stratovolcanoes lie outside the northern and NE caldera rims of Rabaul. Post-caldera eruptions built basaltic-to-dacitic pyroclastic cones on the caldera floor near the NE and western caldera walls. Several of these, including Vulcan cone, which was formed during a large eruption in 1878, have produced major explosive activity during historical time. A powerful explosive eruption in 1994 occurred simultaneously from Vulcan and Tavurvur volcanoes and forced the temporary abandonment of Rabaul city. Photo by Wally Johnson, 1969 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources). Caption: GVP).

FEWW expects ongoing activity, punctuated by explosive eruptions by the volcano, for the rest of 2009 and possibly most of 2010.

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 18:14:32 PDT

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Veniaminof Activity – Color Code GREEN : Alert Level NORMAL

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations: Local time: June 24, 2009 1705 AKDT (June 25, 2009 0105 UTC)
The eruption of Redoubt continues. Seismic activity remains low but above background levels.

Related Links:

Posted in Papua New Guinea, Tavurvur, volcanism, volcanoes, Vulcan | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [18 June 2009]

Posted by feww on June 20, 2009

Sarychev Peak Erupts

NASA Earth Observatory ISS020-E-09048
A fortuitous orbit of the International Space Station allowed the astronauts this striking view of Sarychev Volcano (Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan) in an early stage of eruption on June 12, 2009.

Astronaut photograph ISS020-E-9048 was acquired on June 12, 2009, with a Nikon D2XS digital camera fitted with a 400 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 20 crew. The image in this article has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast. Lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by M. Justin Wilkinson, NASA-JSC. Instrument: ISS – Digital Camera

sarychev_omi_2009167 - SO2

sarychev_omi_key-1

In mid-June 2009, Sarychev Peak Volcano on Matua Island in the northwest Pacific began a series of eruptions of large amounts of ash. According to atmospheric scientist Simon Carn, who is part of the science team for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite, it was also almost certainly the largest sulfur dioxide event so far this year. This image shows average column sulfur dioxide concentrations between June 10 and 17, 2009, based on data from OMI. High concentrations of sulfur dioxide stretched westward from the volcano as far as Sakhalin Island and mainland Russia and eastward as far as Alaska.

Powerful volcanic eruptions can inject sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere. At these altitudes, the sulfates can linger for months or years, cooling the climate by reflecting incoming sunlight. Data from other satellites (such as CALIPSO) suggest that the volcanic plume reached altitudes of 10–15 kilometers, and perhaps as high as 21 km. NASA image courtesy Simon Carn, Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University. Caption by Rebecca Lindsey. Instrument: Aura – OMI [Edited by FEWW.]

[If you thought that looks like a lot, imagine what 38,058,000,000,000.00 kg of CO2 looks like. more than 38,058 MMT of Co2 are released to the environment as a result of human activity: World Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Consumption Including Flaring, Cement Production, and Tropical Deforestation.

FEWW estimates that human activity emitted about 222 times more CO2 in 2008 than the total sum of  all carbon dioxide spewed from volcanic eruptions that year. ]

FEWW Comments:

FEWW cannot rule out the possibility that Sarychev Peak activity may continue unabated, with a pattern of eruptions not dissimilar to the Chaitén scenario.

Previous Comments by FEWW

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Volcanic Activity Report:  10 June – 16 June 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Saturday, Jun 20, 2009 at 06:06:23 PDT

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Veniaminof Activity – Color Code GREEN : Alert Level NORMAL

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations [2009-06-20 02:34:17]

The eruption of Redoubt continues. Seismic activity remains low but above background levels.  Webcam images of the summit are currently obscured by clouds and darkness. AVO continues to monitor Redoubt’s activity 24/7.

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Posted in Chaiten, Climate Change, climate cooling, stratosphere, sulfate aerosols | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sarychev Peak Spews Two Plumes of Ash

Posted by feww on June 14, 2009

In the Majestic Earth’s Service

Sarychev Peak Spews Two Plumes of Ash, Helping to Balance Earth’s Energy Budget

FEWW Moderators believe that Earth is using some of her natural mechanisms to balance her energy budget, which has been forced into red by human activity. Over the coming months, Moderators will explain how the system works.

It’s a balancing act on a planetary level, and there’s a price to pay for using large-scale natural defense mechanisms. They don’t come cheap. Even IF successful on the planetary scale, the “trade-off,” if it can be so crudely termed, would be reflected in further erosion of the earth’s debilitated carrying capacity…

Watch this space for more information!

Activity at Sarychev Peak


Sarychev Peak located in NW end of Matua Island (Ostrov Matua) in Russia’s central Kurils reportedly spewed  ash plumes in two directions, west-northwesterly, and east-southeasterly. NASA’s Aqua satellite using its Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured this image on June 12, 2009. Thanks to the age of modern technology (!), NASA’s MODIS Rapid Response Team at Goddard Space Flight Center rapidly posted the image on their website in under 48 hours.

Sarychev Peak (Kuril Islands, Russia)


A cloudcap obscurs the dramatic, 250-m-wide, steep-walled summit crater of Sarychev volcano, one of the most active volcanoes of the Kuril Islands. Sarychev occupies the NW end of Matua Island in the central Kurils in this NASA Space Shuttle image (with north to the top). The andesitic central cone was constructed within a mostly buried 3-3.5 km wide caldera; an older volcano forms the SE part of the island (lower right). The substantially higher SE rim forms the 1496 m high point of the island. Fresh-looking lava flows descend all sides of Sarychev Peak. Eruptions have been recorded since the 1760’s and include both quiet lava effusion and violent explosions. The largest historical eruption of Sarychev Peak in 1946 produced pyroclastic flows that reached the sea. The small island of Toporkovyi is partially visible at the right-center. Image: NASA Space Shuttle image ISS005-E-17796, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/). Caption: GVP

Volcano Details
Country: Russia
Region: Kuril Islands
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Summit Elevation: 1,496 m
Latitude: 48.092°N (48°5’30″N)
Longitude: 153.20°E (153°12’0″E)
Source: Global Volcanism Program

Related Links:

[FEWW Volcanic Forecasts]

Posted in Earthquakes, Loyalty Arc, New Hebrides Arc, Okhotsk plate, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »