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Posts Tagged ‘Strombolian Phase’

Eyjafjallajökull Ejects ‘Lava Lumps’

Posted by feww on April 20, 2010

Eruption at the Eyjafjallajökull

Eyjafjallajökull has been ejecting “lumps of lava”  from the volcano crater in the glacier in the past few hours, local geo-scientists have reported.


The Electric
Eyjafjallajökull. Date and photographer unknown. Image may be subject to copyright. Click Source for more photos. Click image to enlarge.


A column of ash steam and fumes rises above one of the three main craters at Eyjafjallajokull glacier. April 19, 2010. Soiurce: Reuters/Jon Gustafsson/Helicopter.is/Handout.

Meanwhile, Icelandic Meteorological Office reported that ashfall in the capital Reykjavik was unlikely. The risk is mitigated by easterly wind, blowing the ash away from the capital area, and rain forecast which could reduce the risk of ashfall.

Direct observations of Eyjafjallajökull showed  that lave was being splattered out of the volcano. The volcanic plume reached a height of about 3,000m (10000 feet), peaking to about 5,200m (17000 feet).

The local experts reported the plume as being  mostly white, “but with very dark pillars of smoke” blending in. “According to the Icelandic Meteorological Office website, the plume rose up to 4000 meters at 8:50 this morning. A lower plume indicates that water cannot enter the crater and that lava has begun to flow into it.”A report said.

There was no report of lava flows from the volcano, as of posting.

Ash Cloud Over Europe

Weather patterns continue to blow vast pockets of ash towards the UK and Ireland.

The UK Met Office, which is the North-west European Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre with responsibility for issuing the Volcanic Ash Advisories for volcanoes erupting in this area, said their priority and role is provide information that would support decision-making by NATS, CAA and other aviation authorities .

“It is for the aviation industry and regulator to set thresholds for safe ash ingestion. Currently, world-wide advice from ICAO is based on engine and airframe manufacturers stating that aircraft should not be exposed to any volcanic ash.” It said.


Shades of orange represent the volcanic ash in the atmosphere. © Copyright EUMETSAT/Met Office. Click image to enlarge.


The above is an illustration of volcanic ash dispersion up to 20,000 ft, issued at 7 am on 19 April. Advisory charts are issued every six hours, for up to 18 hours ahead, by the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center.


Volcanic Ash Advisory Graphics from London Met Office. Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

Ash cloud from Eyjafjallajökull reached  Canada’s Eastern seaboard

“The ash cloud is very diffuse, moving slowly and should not affect Canadian airports,” said an Environment Canada spokeswoman.

A forecaster at UK’s Met Office said it was unlikely that the ash would drift much further into North America.

“It is just skirting into the Newfoundland area over the next 12 to 18 hours. It doesn’t look as if it is going to get much further west than that, just on the coast and a little further inland.” He said.

Newfoundland is the closest tip of North America to Iceland.

Photo Links:

Related Links – Fire-Earth entries on Eyjafjallajökull and other useful  sources:

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Posted in Eyjafjallajökull, Eyjafjallajökull eruption, Iceland volcano | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Mayon Volcano Update [25 December 2009]

Posted by feww on December 25, 2009

Mayon Volcano Activity: Intense

Mayon Volcano activity remains at high levels of intensity


Mayon Volcano spews ash as glowing lava cascades down its slope during a mild eruption, December 24, 2009.  Credit: REUTERS/Erik de Castro. Image may be subject to copyright. Click image to enlarge.

During the past 24-hr observation period, the state vulcanologists observed and recorded:

  • 96 ash explosions when visibility permitted.
  • Columns of “light brown to grayish” ash ejected to a height of  2 km.
  • 125  booming and rumbling sounds detected at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City.
  • Elevated seismic activity.
  • 871 volcanic earthquakes.
  • 98 rock fall events, “related to detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes.”
  • Pyroclastic flows moved down within 2 km from the crater.
  • Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission averaged at 2,738 tonnes/day.
  • Volcano hazard warning remains at alert level 4.

The following Bulletin was released by The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) today:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 12  released on 25 December 2009

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to show an intense level of activity during the past 24-hour observation period. Ninety-six (96) ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced light brown to grayish ash columns that reached heights of up to 2 km. One hundred twenty five (125) rumbling and booming sounds from the volcano were heard at the Lignon Hill Observatory in Legaspi City. Seismic activity remained elevated as the seismic network recorded a total of eight hundred seventy one (871) volcanic earthquakes. Ninety eight (98) rock fall events, related to detachment of lava fragments at the volcano’s upper slopes, were also detected. Three of these events were observed to have generated pyroclastic flows that moved down within 2 km from the crater. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was high and was measured at an average of 2,738 tonnes/day yesterday.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For previous entries, additional information, photos and links to Mayon Volcano see:

Related Links:

Posted in ash ejected, Explosive Eruption, mayon ash explosion, mayon seismic activity, pyroclastic flows | Tagged: , , , , | 6 Comments »

Mayon Volcano Update 23 December

Posted by feww on December 23, 2009

Mayon Volcano Undergoing Strombolian Phase

Mt Mayon is believed to be in a strombolian phase (often occurs before a major eruption), say state vulcanologists.

  • Lava flow has reached 5.5 km from the summit.
  • There may be a series of eruptions instead of a single catastrophic explosion.
  • Magma movement continues to generate continuous tremors.
  • Albay residents who refuse to leave their properties may have to sign a waiver.

The following bulletin was issued by PHIVOLCS:

Mayon Volcano Bulletin 10
23 December 2009 – 7:00 AM [UTC + 8hrs]

Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) continued to show an intense level of activity during the past 24-hour observation period. Seismic activity remained elevated in number and size as the seismic network detected 1,051 volcanic earthquakes and continuously recorded harmonic tremors. Many of these volcanic earthquakes were recorded at maximum deflection. Sixty six (66) ash explosions were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced grayish to light brown ash columns that reached height from 100 to 1000 meters above the summit before drifting towards southwest.

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate remained very high and was measured at an average of 6,737 tons per day (t/d) yesterday. Two hundred eighty (280) audible booming and rumbling sounds were intermittently heard for the past 24 hours.  Red hot lava also continuously flowed down along the Bonga-Buyuan, Miisi and Lidong gullies.

Alert Level 4 remains hoisted over Mayon Volcano, meaning a hazardous eruption is possible within days.  Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST reiterates that the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) from the summit of 8-km on the southern sector of the volcano and 7-km on the northern sector should be free from human activity.  Areas just outside of this EDZ should prepare for evacuation in the event hazardous explosive eruptions intensify.  Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall.  PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

For additional information click on the link below:

Related Links:

Posted in Explosive Eruption, Guinobatan ashfall, magma movement, Philippines volcanoes, volcano | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »