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Posts Tagged ‘volcanic activity’

Kīlauea Volcano: Explosion in Overlook Vent Produces Large Volcanic Cloud

Posted by feww on May 17, 2018

Volcanic Activity Summary:

At about 0415 [HST?] this morning, an explosion from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kilauea Volcano’s summit produced a volcanic cloud that reaches as high as 30,000 ft asl and drifted northeast. Continued emissions from the crater are reaching as high as 12,000 ft asl.

At any time, activity may again become more explosive, increasing the intensity of ash production and producing ballistic projectiles near the vent. [USGS-HVO]

This video shows spattering at fissure 18, Kīlauea Volcano’s Lower East Rift Zone, at approximately 2:00 AM HST on May 16, 2018. The audio captures the sounds of explosions and burning vegetation.


Lava spattering area from an area between fissures 16 and 20 photographed at 8:20 a.m. today [Time Zone Not Specified.]


Close view of rock hurled from the Overlook crater during an explosive event last evening. The rock broke apart on impact, and was about 60 cm (24 in) before it hit the ground. The location is a few hundred meters (yards) south of the Overlook crater at the Halema‘uma‘u parking lot. Note the ash covering the parking lot, less than about 1 cm (0.4 in) in thickness. 


View uprift from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight this morning at 8:25 a.m. Note sulfur dioxide plumes rising from the fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck. Winds are calm today. [Time Zone Not Specified.]


Aerial view (from a helicopter) of spattering between fissures 16 and 20, Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone, at approximately 7:30 AM HST on May 16, 2018. The audio is the sound of the helicopter. [All images and videos mirrored from USGS-HVO]

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RED Alert Kilauea Volcano

Posted by feww on May 16, 2018

Ash eruption from Overlook vent intensifies

Volcanic Activity Summary:

As of early this morning, eruption of ash from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kilauea Volcano’s summit has generally increased in intensity. Ash has been rising nearly continuously from the vent and drifting downwind to the southwest. Ashfall and vog (volcanic air pollution) has been reported in Pahala, about 18 miles downwind. NWS radar and pilot reports indicate the top of the ash cloud is as high as 10,000 to 12,000 feet above sea level, but this may be expected to vary depending on the vigor of activity and wind conditions.

Ash emission from the Kilauea summit vent will likely be variable with periods of increased and decreased intensity depending on the occurrence of rockfalls into the vent and other changes within the vent.

At any time, activity may become more explosive, increasing the intensity of ash production and producing ballistic projectiles near the vent. [USGS/HVO @ 23:23:27 UTC 2018-05-15]

Volcanic cloud height: 10,000 – 12,000 feet (3,000 – 4,000 m)


At 11:05 a.m. HST [May 15.] Photograph from the Jaggar Museum, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, captures an ash plume rising from the Overlook crater. Ash falling from the plume can be seen just to the right side (and below) the plume. [USGS/HVO]


At 1:38 p.m. HST [May 15,] another dark ash plume rose from the Overlook crater. During a flight earlier today by the Civil Air Patrol, the height of the ash plumes near the crater rose to more than 3 km (9,800 ft) above sea level, and downwind the plumes continued to rise to about 3.5 km (11,500 ft) above sea level. [USGS/HVO]


TOP: Activity at Halema‘uma‘u crater increased this morning to include the nearly continuous emission of ash with intermittent stronger pulses that form occasional higher plumes 1-2 kilometers (3,000 to 6,000 feet) above the ground. This photo shows the ash plume at about 9 a.m. HST. Tradewinds this morning are blowing the ash generally to the southwest toward the Ka`u Desert. The dark area to the right of the ash column rising from the Overlook crater is ash falling from the ash cloud to the ground. [USGS/HVO]


Ash plume viewed from the Volcano Golf Course near Volcano, Hawai‘i. This view is nearly due north of the Halema‘uma‘u crater. [USGS/HVO]


At 11:43 [May 15] HST, Civil Air Patrol flight CAP20 reported plume tops at about 9,500 ft [~ 3,000m] with the dispersed plume rising as high as 11,000 ft. The CAP mission was launched from Hilo in support of Hawai‘i County Civil Defense and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory response to the ongoing eruption. Ash from this plume was reported falling on communities downwind. [USGS/HVO]

Hazard Analysis:

  • Ash cloud: The ashcloud is drifting downwind primarily to the southwest with the Trade Winds. Wind conditions are expected to change in the next 24 hours and other areas around Kilauea’s summit are likely to receive ashfall.
  • Ashfall: Ashfall has been reported in the community of Pahala, at locations along Highway 11 from Pahala to Volcano, and in the Ka’u Desert section of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
  • Other hazards: Ballistic projectiles may be produced should steam-driven explosions occur. Impacts will be limited to an area around Halemaumau.
  • Volcanic gas: Vog or volcanic air pollution produced by volcanic gas has been reported in Pahala.

 

 

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Fire-Earth Volcano Watch: Global Volcanic Unrest

Posted by feww on May 13, 2016

GMR

Tempo Rising: 28 Volcanoes Firing

[Watch how the Internet prophets and plagiarizers misinterpret this! ]

Latest Volcanic Activity

  • Turrialba (Costa Rica)
  • Rincón de la Vieja (Costa Rica)
  • Guanacaste volcano (Costa Rica)
  • Bristol Island  (South Sandwich Islands -UK) NOM
  • Nevados de Chillán (Chile)
  • Ruapehu, (North Island, NZ)
  • White Island, (North Island, NZ)


Map of Volcanoes.
Background Map: University of Michigan. Designed and enhanced by Fire Earth Blog. Click image to enlarge.

Ongoing Activity

  • Aira (Kyushu, Japan)
  • Alaid (Kuril Islands, Russia)
  • Bagana (Bougainville, PNG)
  • Chirpoi (Kuril Islands, Russia)
  • Cleveland (Chuginadak Island, Alaska)
  • Colima (Mexico)
  • Dukono Halmahera (Indonesia)
  • Fuego (Guatemala)
  • Kerinci (Indonesia)
  • Karymsky (E. Kamchatka, Russia)
  • Kerinci (Indonesia)
  • Kilauea (Hawaii)
  • Klyuchevskoy (C. Kamchatka, Russia)
  • Langila (New Britain, PNG)
  • Masaya (Nicaragua)
  • Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia)
  • Sangay (Ecuador)
  • Sheveluch (C. Kamchatka)
  • Sinabung (Indonesia)
  • Suwanosejima Ryukyu Islands (Japan)
  • Tengger Caldera (E. Java)

Related Links

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FIRE-EARTH Volcanism Index (FEVIX)

Posted by feww on April 23, 2015

CJ Members

FEWW Volcanism Update

A request has been made by several Members for the latest   update of FIRE-EARTH Volcanism Index (FEVIX).

For an update, please see FIRE-EARTH Bulletin issued at 16:35UTC today (April 23, 2015) .

The latest global volcanism is as follows:

  • Calbuco Volcano, Chile, 41.013°S, 72.002°W, April 21, 2015
  • Chikurachki,  Paramushir Island (Russia), 50.324°N, 155.461°E, April 18
  • Raung, Eastern Java, 8.125°S, 114.042°E, April 8
  • Sinabung,  Indonesia, 3.17°N, 98.392°E
  • Tongariro,  North Island (NZ), 39.157°S, 175.632°E, March 28
  • Tungurahua, Ecuador, 1.467°S, 78.442°W,  April 15-21
  • Ubinas, Peru, 16.355°S, 70.903°W, April 15-17
  • Villarrica, Chile, 39.42°S, 71.93°W, 8-14 April

Ongoing Activity
Aira, Kyushu (Japan)
Chirinkotan, Kuril Islands (Russia)
Chirpoi, Kuril Islands
Colima, Mexico
Dukono, Halmahera (Indonesia)
Fuego, Guatemala
Karymsky Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
Kilauea, Hawaiian Islands
Klyuchevskoy, Central Kamchatka
Popocatepetl, Mexico
Reventador, Ecuador
Sheveluch, Central Kamchatka
Shishaldin, Fox Islands (USA)
Tengger Caldera, Eastern Java
Turrialba, Costa Rica

Useful Links

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ETNA Erupts Again, Lighting Up the Sky Over Sicily

Posted by feww on November 18, 2013

Mt ETNA erupted, shooting up towering columns of ash into the air

The eruption from Europe’s most active volcano ejected towering columns of ash and fountains of molten lava over Sicily Saturday night.

Etna, one of the most active volcanoes in the world, is in an almost constant state of activity. The eruption was the 16th paroxysmal explosion at Etna so far this year, forcing officials at Cantania Airport to close airspace above much of Sicily as a precautionary measure.

Mt Etna is the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy, covering an area of about 1,200km², with a basal circumference of 140km.  More than a quarter of Sicily’s live on the slopes of the 3,330-meter volcano.Volcanic activity first occurred at Etna about 500,000 years ago.

A massive lava flow from an eruption in November 1928 destroyed the village of Mascali. Other major 20th-century eruptions occurred in 1949, 1971, 1981, 1983 and 1991–1993.

Posted in Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic activity, volcanic eruption, volcanic event, volcanic hazard, volcanism report, volcano, volcano eruption, volcano images, Volcano News, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Major Geological Events Forecast for Western U-S

Posted by feww on November 19, 2011

FIRE-EARTH FORECAST:

MAJOR GEOLOGICAL EPISODES COULD IMPACT THE ENTIRE WESTERN UNITED STATES, BEGINNING IN THE NEXT 18 MONTHS  [PROBABILITY ≥ 0.8]

Related Links:

  • WARNING: Many parts of the United States could become ‘unrecognizable’ due to extreme climatic, geophysical and geological episodes over the next 18 months: FIRE-EARTH Forecast

Posted in global disasters, Mechanism for Mega Disasters, Mega Disasters | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Eyjafjallajökull – Shock Waves Caught on Video

Posted by feww on April 29, 2010

Eyjafjallajökull Still Erupting, Lava Flowing, Plume Staying Low

The following link to an Icelandic site, Visir,  shows a brief video footage of shock waves emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull Glacier volcano.

Latest image of eruption at Eyjafjallajökull


This image of steam and ash spewing out of the
Eyjafjallajökull Glacier is dated April 27, 2o1o and is one of the latest image of eruption posted  at the Institute of Earth Sciences, Nordic Volcanic Center. The moderators are still treating materials from the website as subject to copyright.  For more images visit their website.

Related Links:

Serial No 1,640. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).

Posted in Eyjafjallajökull, Eyjafjallajökull eruption, eyjafjallajokull map, Eyjafjöll, volcano | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Eyjafjallajökull Eruption Portents Catastrophic Sequence

Posted by feww on April 26, 2010

Three Reasons Why the Moderators Believe a  Sequence of Catastrophic Eruptions May Occur in Iceland

  1. It would be consistent with the resurgence of volcanic activity globally, which may have started recently.
  2. Historically, the eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull have been associated with subsequent eruptions at a larger volcano, usually Katla.
  3. Volcanic eruptions are a component of the planet’s defense mechanism.

In our opinion, the question is no longer “if” but “how soon” a cataclysmic event, or indeed a series of events would occur.

The answer, we believe, is found in EDRO Collapse Model.  As of 2010, Google Civilizations are about half way through the human-induced antiphase.

Status Update:

Eruption at Eyjafjallajökull continues unabated. No significant change reported since previous update.


An image of the eruption at
Eyjafjallajökull (2010.04.24 – Þórdís Högnadóttir – 2). No other information available in English. Source: Institute of Earth Sciences. Image may be subject to copyright. Older images …

Related Links:

Serial No 1,629. Starting April 2010, each entry on this blog has a unique serial number. If any of the numbers are missing, it may mean that the corresponding entry has been blocked by Google/the authorities in your country. Please drop us a line if you detect any anomaly/missing number(s).

Posted in eyjafjalla, Eyjafjallajökull, Eyjafjallajökull eruption, eyjafjallajoekull volcano, Iceland volcano, Icelandic volcano | Tagged: , , , | 5 Comments »

Submarine Volcano Erupts Near Japan

Posted by feww on February 6, 2010

Fukutokuokanoba submarine volcano erupts

White smoke was observed rising from the sea about five kilometers north-northeast of the Minami-Iwoto island in Ogasawara Islands, a Japanese coast guard patrol vessel reported, Yomiuri Shimbun said.

Smoke believed to be emanating from an underwater volcano was previously detected in the area, about 1,200 kilometers south of central Tokyo, in July 2005.

Tokyo Institute of Technology geoscience Professor, Kenji Nogami, reportedly said: “In the 1986 eruption, a new island appeared after lava accumulated. The island was washed away by waves, but seabed upheaval reduced the water depth to 22 meters in 1999. It’s possible that this [recent] volcanic activity could form a permanent island.”


Location Map, Volcano Islands, Ogasawara Islands, Japan. Image credit: Lim Tor


Bonin Islands (aka, Ogasawara Group, in Japan).  Click Image to Enlarge.

The volcano reportedly ejected  smoke and ash to a height of about about 100 meters above the sea level. The surrounding sea area was reported as changing to a greenish yellow color with other nearby areas turning cloudy.

Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) said the volcano, called Fukutokuokanoba, has erupted seven times since 1904, forming ephemeral islands (temporary land masses) on three occasions, all of which later sank below the ocean surface.

The first known ephemeral island called Shin-Iwo-jima (New Sulfur Island) was formed in 1904, and the most recent in 1986.

What the Volcano Islands Look Like


North Iwo Jima Island (Official Japanese name Kita-iōtō, but commonly known as Kita-iōjima, meaning “north sulfur island”) is the northernmost island of the Volcano Islands cluster of the Ogasawara Islands, about 1175 km south of Tokyo. Image Credit: Chisatos

Related Links:

Posted in Japan Volcano, New Sulfur Island, Ogasawaramura, Tokyo Prefecture, volcanism | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [8 January 2010]

Posted by feww on January 11, 2010

VoW: Turrialba


Turrialba has been quiescent since a series of explosive eruptions during the 19th century that were sometimes accompanied by pyroclastic flows. Photo by Federico Chavarria Kopper, 1999. Caption: GVP.

Volcano Details

  • Country: Costa Rica
  • Volcano Number: 1405-07=
  • Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
  • Last Known Eruption: 1866 (see below for latest report)
  • Summit Elevation: 3,340 m
  • Latitude: 10.025°N  (10°1’30″N)
  • Longitude: 83.767°W  (83°46’1″W)

SI /USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
(30 December – 5 January 2010)

New activity/Unrest:

Volcano News (Source: GVP)

An explosive eruption from Galeras on 2 January prompted INGEOMINAS to raise the Alert Level. An ash plume rose to an altitude of 12 km (39,400 ft) a.s.l. Ejected incandescent blocks ignited fires.

Nyamuragira erupted on 2 January from a fissure on the SE flank. By 3 January, the lava flow had traveled 4.6 km and had burned about 10 hectares of forest.

On 1 January, an ash plume from Tungurahua rose to an altitude of 5.9 km (19,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Slight ashfall was reported the next day in Manzano. On 3 and 4 January, incandescent blocks were ejected from the crater.

On 5 January, OVSICORI-UNA reported that an eruption from Turrialba produced ashfall in local areas, particularly in areas to the SW. (SOURCE: GVP)

Ongoing Activity

Barren Island, Andaman Is;  Chaitén, Southern Chile;  Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka;  Kilauea, Hawaii (USA);  Kliuchevskoi, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Nevado del Huila, Colombia;  Rabaul, New Britain;  Sakura-jima, Kyushu;  Sangay, Ecuador;  Santa María, Guatemala;  Shiveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia);  Soufrière Hills, Montserrat;  Suwanose-jima, Ryukyu Islands (Japan).

The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program.

Related Links:

More Links:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast

Other Related Links:

Posted in Rinjani, Tungurahua, Turrialba, volcanism, volcano | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Latest Earthquakes Magnitude 5.5 +

Posted by feww on September 19, 2009

Latest Earthquakes Measuring Magnitude 5.5 or Larger since September 18, 2009

The following significant earthquakes occurred within a 12-hour period.

The Bali Earthquake detailed below was reported as a Magnitude  6.0  shock by the  European-Mediterranean Seismological Center. 

GFZ Potsdam – Earthquake Bulletin
Region: South of Bali, Indonesia
Time: 2009-09-18 at 23:06:59.5 UTC
Magnitude: 5.9
Epicenter: 115.42°E 9.47°S
Depth: 77 km
Status: automatic
gfz2009simp location map

The quake was described as “very strong” by a number of people who sopke to the media. People were reportedly jumping from building and running away from their homes in panic after the quake struck. Up to a dozen people have been injured, some hurt jumping from buildings while others were hit by falling debris, according to news reports quoting officials.  No tsunami warning was issued.

An earthquake on the main Indonesian island of Java left more than 50 dead on September 2, 2009.

The 9.3 Mw Sumatra-Andaman earthquake which caused the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed an estimated quarter of million people in 11 countries, was the second largest earthquake recorded on a seismograph. The earthquake was also characterized by the longest ever duration of faulting lasting about 10 minutes, which made the entire planet to vibrate about 1 cm triggering earthquakes as far north as in Alaska.

FEWW Comments: More Mega-quakes should be expected in this region and other areas in the coming months. FEWW will post a separate [disturbing] forecast later.

Magnitude 5.6 – REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS REGION

  • Date-Time:  Friday, September 18, 2009 at 18:46:08 UTC [Friday, September 18, 2009 at 11:46:08 AM at epicenter]
  • Location: 19.239°N, 108.494°W
  • Depth 10 km (6.2 miles)
  • Distances: 265 km (165 miles) ENE of Socorro Island, Mexico
  • Source: USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)

10-degree Map Centered at 20°N,110°W

REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS REGION
EQ Location Map. Source of original map: USGS

GFZ Potsdam – Earthquake Bulletin

Region: Halmahera, Indonesia
Time: 2009-09-18 at 18:34:25.6 UTC
Magnitude: 5.7
Epicenter: 127.16°E 1.80°N
Depth: 110 km

Status: manually revised
gfz2009sidp location map

GFZ Potsdam – Earthquake Bulletin

GFZ Potsdam – Earthquake Bulletin
Region: Mindanao, Philippines
Time: 2009-09-18 11:53:50.2 UTC
Magnitude: 5.5
Epicenter: 124.71°E 6.51°N
Depth: 23 km
Status: manually revised

gfz2009shqk location map
GFZ Potsdam Images
© Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum – GFZ

Related Links:

Posted in Alaska quake, Bali quake, Indian Ocean tsunami, Java Quake, Mega-Quakes, REVILLA GIGEDO ISLANDS, Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, tsunami warning | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VolcanoWatch Weekly [4 June 2009]

Posted by feww on June 5, 2009

FEWW ‘EarthModel’ Correctly forecast renewed enhanced activity at Mt Etna

See FEWW forecast: Earthquake Forecast: Southern Italy, Sicily

See GVP Report: ETNA Sicily (Italy) 37.734°N, 15.004°E; summit elev. 3330 m

INGV-CT reported that during 25-31 May the NW-SE-trending fissure E of the Etna summit craters continued (since 13 May 2008) to produce active lava flows to the N of the SE end of the fissure, along the W wall of the Valle del Bove. At least three lava flows were active. Elsewhere on the volcano, activity was restricted to degassing from the Northeast Crater, from the NW and SE Bocca Nuova vents, from the E flank of the Southeast Crater, and along summit fumarolic fields. The activity was observed directly and by utilizing surveillance cameras in Milo (about 11 km ESE).

Volcanic Activity Report:  27 May – 2 June 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

FEWW Volcanic Activity Forecast:

FEWW Moderators forecast  new volcanic activity/ unrest at 50 or more volcanoes throughout the rest of 2009.

List of the volcanoes to watch this year [and in 2010] includes:

Barcena (0.8), Socorro (0.8), Curacoa (0.99), Atitlán (0.65), Vesuvius (>0.6), Bazman (0.6), Mount Shasta (>0.5), Kaba (>0.5), Bandai (>0.5), Eastern Gemini Seamount or Mathew Island volcano (0.65), Fonualei (0.65), Mount Rainier (>0.5), Jan Mayen (>0.6), Thule (0.4), Sibayak (>0.5), Volcán Guallatiri (0.65), Taveuni (>0.4),  two or more volcanoes on the island of Hokkaido (0.65), E-san (0.7), Oshima-Oshima (0.7), Komaga-take (0.65)

Continued …

Figure in the brackets indicate probability of activity/unrest.

For other forecasts see also:

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Thursday, Jun 4, 2009 at 23:33:10 PDT

  • Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Kilauea Activity  –  Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

  • Mauna Loa Activity – Color Code YELLOW : Alert Level ADVISORY

Related Links:

Posted in earthquake forecast, Etna, Hokkaido Volcanoes, Makian, volcanoes | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

Volcano Watch Weekly [6 May 2009]

Posted by feww on May 7, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 29 April – 5 May 2009

Source: Global Volcanism program (GVP) – SI/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Atitlán

Country:  Guatemala
Volcano Type:  Stratovolcano
Volcano Status:  Historical
Last Known Eruption: 1853
Summit Elevation: 3,535 m  (11,598 feet)
Latitude: 14.583°N  (14°34’58″N)
Longitude: 91.186°W  (91°11’11″W)


Volcán Atitlán is one of several prominent conical stratovolcanoes in the Guatemalan highlands. Along with its twin volcano Tolimán to the north, it forms a dramatic backdrop to Lake Atitlán, one of the scenic highlights of the country. The 3535-m-high summit of Atitlán directly overlies the inferred margin of the Pleistocene Atitlán III caldera and is the highest of three large post-caldera stratovolcanoes constructed near the southern caldera rim. The volcano consequently post-dates the eruption of the voluminous, roughly 85,000-year-old rhyolitic Los Chocoyos tephra associated with formation of the Atitlán III caldera. The historically active andesitic Volcán Atitlán is younger than Tolimán, although their earlier activity overlapped. In contrast to Tolimán, Atitlán displays a thick pyroclastic cover. The northern side of the volcano is wooded to near the summit, whereas the upper 1000 m of the southern slopes are unvegetated. Predominantly explosive eruptions have been recorded from Volcán Atitlán since the 15th century. Photo by Bill Rose, 1980(Michigan Technological University). Caption GVP.

Major Volcanoes of Guatemala

REPORT:
Volcanic Hazards at Atitlán Volcano, Guatemala

—J.M. Haapala, R. Escobar Wolf, J.W. Vallance, W.I. Rose, J.P. Griswold, S.P. Schilling, J.W. Ewert, and M. Mota, 2006
Volcanic Hazards at Atitlán Volcano, Guatemala U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1403

Introduction

Atitlán Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlán caldera, which contains Lake Atitlán. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes—San Pedro, Tolimán, and Atitlán—have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlán is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlán Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs.

Eruptions of Atitlán began more than 10 ka and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400’s, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826–1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano’s behavior is documented prior to the 1800’s. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano’s behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlán Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period.

Because of Atitlán’s moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlán and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlán Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness. [Report Menu]

Ongoing Activity:

Latest U.S. Volcano Alerts and Updates for Wednesday, May 6, 2009 at 17:51:20 PDT

Related Links:

Posted in Bagana, Krakatau, Redoubt, Rinjani, Shiveluch | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Weekly Volcano Watch: 2 April 2009

Posted by feww on April 2, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 25 March – 31 March 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

VoW: Bandai

Country: Japan
Region: Honshu Is (Japan)
Volcano Type:  Stratovolcano
Last Known Eruption: 1888
Summit Elevation: 1819 m  (5,968 feet)
Latitude: 37.598°N  (37°35’53″N)
Longitude: 140.076°E  (140°4’32″E)


One of Japan’s most noted volcanoes, Bandai-san rises above the north shore of Lake Inawashiro. The Bandai complex is formed of several overlapping andesitic stratovolcanoes, the largest of which is O-Bandai. Ko-Bandai volcano, which collapsed in 1888, was formed about 50,000 years ago. O-Bandai volcano was constructed within a horseshoe-shaped caldera that formed about 40,000 years when an older volcano collapsed, forming the Okinajima debris avalanche, which traveled to the SW and was accompanied by a plinian explosive eruption. The last magmatic eruption at Bandai took place more than 25,000 years ago, but four major phreatic eruptions have occurred during the past 5,000 years, two of them in historical time, in 806 and 1888.  Seen from the south, Bandai presents a conical profile, but much of the north side of the volcano is missing as a result of the collapse of Ko-Bandai volcano during the 1888 eruption, in which a debris avalanche buried several villages and formed several large lakes.
Akahani-yama (extreme right) is another Bandai stratovolcano. The forested ridge at the left foreground is part of an earlier Pleistocene debris-avalanche deposit. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1988 (Smithsonian Institution). Caption: GVP

FEWW Comment: Eastern Gemini Seamount or Mathew Island volcano may erupt by about June 2009.

Ongoing Volcanic Activity:

Elevated Volcanic Activity in the US [Source: USGS]

Wednesday, Apr 1, 2009 at 17:23:17 PDT.

  • Cleveland Alert Level=ADVISORY. Aviation Color Code=YELLOW. As of Apr 1, 2009, 12:22 ADT – No activity reported. (Change to current status occurred on Jan 2, 2009 12:52 ADT from Alert Level UNASSIGNED and Aviation Color Code UNASSIGNED ).
    For more information see http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Cleveland.php
  • Redoubt Alert Level=WARNING. Aviation Color Code=RED. As of Apr 1, 2009, 12:22 ADT – Continuous emissions of steam, volcanic gases, and minor amounts of ash continue at Mt. Redoubt. Altitudes typically below 15,000ft but as high as 25,000ft at times. (Change to current status occurred on Mar 26, 2009 09:43 ADT from Alert Level WATCH and Aviation Color Code ORANGE )
    For more information see http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Redoubt.php
  • Kilauea Alert Level=WATCH. Aviation Color Code=ORANGE. As of Apr 1, 2009, 08:29 HST- Elevated SO2 and some tephra from Halema`uma`u vent; elevated SO2 from Pu`u `O`o vent; lava in tubes to ocean. (Change to current status occurred on Jul 2, 2007 20:09 HST from Alert Level ADVISORY and Aviation Color Code YELLOW ).
    For more information see http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/activity/kilaueastatus.php
  • Mauna Loa Alert Level=ADVISORY. Aviation Color Code=YELLOW. As of Mar 27, 2009, 09:08 HST – Low level of unrest continues. (Mauna Loa has been at this Alert Level and Color Code since this system was implemented in 2005)
    For more information see http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/activity/maunaloastatus.php

Volcano Alert Levels & Aviation Color Codes defined at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem.

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Volcano Watch: 24 February 2009

Posted by feww on February 26, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 18 February – 24 February 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Volcano of the Week: Sibayak

Country:   Indonesia
Region:    Sumatra (Indonesia)
Volcano Type:    Stratovolcanoes
Last Known Eruption:     1881
Summit Elevation:     2212 m     7,257 feet
Latitude:     3.23°N     3°14’0″N
Longitude:     98.52°E     98°31’0″E


Sibayak volcano in NE Sumatra and its twin volcano Mt. Pinto are constructed within a compound caldera. The slightly higher Mt. Pinto partially overtops the 900-m-wide crater of Sibayak on the north. The summit contains a lava dome and an area of hydrothermal alteration visible in this photo. An ash eruption from Sibayak was recorded in 1881, and area residents note legends of eruptions. Photo by Tom Casadevall, 1987 (U.S. Geological Survey). Caption: GVP


Sibayak crater lake.
Credit: browngroove via flickr. See source for copyright information.

Ongoing Activity:

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Volcano Watch: 17 February 2009

Posted by msrb on February 19, 2009

Volcanic Activity Report: 11 February – 17 February 2009

Source: SI / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report

New activity/unrest:

Volcano of the Week: Ebeko

Country:    Russia
Region   :    Kuril Islands

Volcano Type:     Somma volcano
Last Known Eruption:     2005
Summit Elevation:   1,156 m     (3,793 feet)
Latitude:     50.68°N     (50°41’0″N)
Longitude:     156.02°E    (156°1’0″)


An ash-bearing eruption column rises above the North crater of Ebeko volcano on September 9, 1989. An explosive eruption that began on February 2, 1989 continued until April 1990. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, which occupies the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones at the northern end of Paramushir Island. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Photo courtesy of Kamchatka Volcanic Eruptions Response Team, 1989. Caption: GVP

The Tokyo VAAC reported an ash plume which drifted NE from Ebeko at an altitude of 0.6 km. Another ash plume was detected drifting SW at an altitude of 1.2 km ft.

Geologic Summary. The flat-topped summit of the central cone of Ebeko volcano, one of the most active in the Kuril Islands, occupies the northern end of Paramushir Island. Three summit craters located along a SSW-NNE line form Ebeko volcano proper, at the northern end of a complex of five volcanic cones. The eastern part of the southern crater of Ebeko contains strong solfataras and a large boiling spring. The central crater of Ebeko is filled by a lake about 20 m deep whose shores are lined with steaming solfataras; the northern crater lies across a narrow, low barrier from the central crater and contains a small, cold crescentic lake. Historical activity, recorded since the late-18th century, has been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive eruptions from the summit craters. Intense fumarolic activity occurs in the summit craters of Ebeko, on the outer flanks of the cone, and in lateral explosion craters. GVP

Ongoing Activity:

Posted in Arenal, fumarolic activity, Kamchatka, Paramushir Island, Shishaldin | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Week 35 Volcano Watch

Posted by feww on September 6, 2008

27 August-2 September 2008

New Activity/Unrest:


Deposits from the pyroclastic flow on 25 August 2008. Inset shows image from thermal camera. Source: Montserrat Volcano Observatory’s photostream. Image may be subject to copyright.

Ongoing Activity:

See the GVP Home Page for news of the latest significant activity.

The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program.

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Kilauea Volcano Continues to Discharge Lava

Posted by feww on July 15, 2008

Kilauea Status Reports, Updates, and Information Releases

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Monday, July 14, 2008 07:48 HST (Monday, July 14, 2008 17:48 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW#1302-01-)
19.42°N 155.29°W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Aviation Color Code: ORANGE


The lava fountain on shield 3 (12-15 m high). USGS

Activity Summary for last 24 hours: Kilauea summit and Pu`u `O`o cone continued to deflate. Unusually small amounts of ash and elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas continued to issue from the Halema`uma`u vent. At the east rift eruption site, incandescence was observed from vents within Pu`u `O`o Crater; lava flows from the TEB vent flows through tubes to ocean at Waikupanaha; surface flows within the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision may have reached the coastal plain.

More …

Photograph by C. Heliker on September 19, 1984

Lava fountain 450 m high bursts from Pu`u `O`o in September 1984. In the foreground, low fountains play above a fissure that opened just before the main vent began to erupt. After the high fountains relieved some of the pressure on the magmatic system, the fissure activity died.

Summary of the Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha Eruption, 1983-present

The Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea, now in its twenty-fourth year and 55th eruptive episode, ranks as the most voluminous outpouring of lava on the volcano’s east rift zone in the past five centuries. By January 2007, 3.1 cubic km of lava had covered 117 km2 and added 201 hectares to Kilauea’s southern shore. In the process, lava flows destroyed 189 structures and resurfaced 14 km of highway with as much as 35 m of lava.

Beginning in 1983, a series of short-lived lava fountains built the massive cinder-and-spatter cone of Pu`u` O`o. In 1986, the eruption migrated 3 km down the east rift zone to build a broad shield, Kupaianaha, which fed lava to the coast for the next 5.5 years.

When the eruption shifted back to Pu`u `O`o in 1992, flank-vent eruptions formed a shield banked against the west side of the cone. From 1992 to 2007, nearly continuous effusion from these vents has sent lava flows to the ocean, mainly inside the national park. Flank vent activity undermined the west and south sides of the cone, resulting in the collapse of the west flank in January 1997.

Since 1997, the eruption has continued from a series of flank vents on the west and south sides of the Pu`u `O`o cone. During this time the composite flow field has expanded westward, and tube-fed pahoehoe forms a plain that spans 15.6 km at the coast.


Puʻu ʻŌʻō ( pronounced roughly “poo-oo oh-oh”) is a cinder/spatter cone in the eastern rift zone of the Kīlauea volcano of the Hawaiian Islands. USGS.


Aerial view of lava lake in Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater. The crater is about 250 m in diameter. 30 August 1990. Credit: J.D. Griggs – USGS/HVO


1983-1986, The rise of Pu`u `O`o: episodic lava fountains build massive cone. USGS


Lava moves across the ground as a pahoehoe flow, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i – Photograph by J.D. Griggs on 13 November 1985 – USGS

Eruption_1954_Kilauea_Volcano
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. May 1954 eruption of Kilauea Volcano. Halemaumau fountains. Photo by J.P. Eaton, May 31, 1954. USGS

This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity, in addition to maps, photos, and webcam images (available using the menu bar above), was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park status can be found at http://www.nps.gov/havo/ or 985-6000. Hawai`i County Viewing Area status can be found at http://www.lavainfo.us or 961-8093.

More …

Related Links:

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