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Viruses

[Page content sourced from CDC]

Drug-Resistant Organisms

Acinetobacter

Medical illustration of Acinetobacter

Campylobacter

Medical illustration of Campylobacter

Candida

Medical illustration of Candida

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Medical illustration of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Enterococcus

Medical illustration of Enterococcus

Extended-spectrum β-lactamase

Medical illustration of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Tuberculosis

sMedical illustration of tuberculosis

MRSA

MRSA Bacteria

PHIL ID # 10046
Photo Credit: Janice Haney, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This 2005 colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts numerous clumps of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, e.g., bloodstream, pneumonia, bone infections, occur most frequently among persons in hospitals and healthcare facilities, including nursing homes, and dialysis centers.

MRSA

MRSA Bacteria

PHIL ID # 10045
Photo Credit: Janice Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description: This 2005 colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts numerous clumps of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, e.g., bloodstream, pneumonia, bone infections, occur most frequently among persons in hospitals and healthcare facilities, including nursing homes, and dialysis centers.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

Medical illustration of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

Medical illustration of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Neisseria Gonorrhoeae

Medical illustration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Neisseria Gonorrhoeae

Medical illustration of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Non-typhoidal Salmonella

Medical illustration of non-typhoidal Salmonella.

Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

Medical illustration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Salmonella Typhi

Medical illustration of Salmonella Typhi.

Streptococcus Agalactiae

Medical illustration of Streptococcus agalactiae.

Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

Medical illustration of Shigella.

Tuberculosis

Medical illustration of tuberculosis.

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Common and Recent Organisms

Zika Virus

 Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Zika virus

PHIL ID #20487
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith
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Description:
This is a transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Zika virus, which is a member of the family Flaviviridae. Virus particles are 40 nm in diameter, with an outer envelope, and an inner dense core.

Ebola

Colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealing some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

PHIL ID #10815
Photo Credit: Frederick Murphy
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Description:
Colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealing some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

Ebola

Colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealing some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

PHIL ID #10816
Photo Credit: Frederick Murphy
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Description:
Colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealing some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

Avian Influenza A H7N9

Electron Micrograph Images of H7N9 Virus from China

PHIL ID #15670
Photo Credit: Cynthia S. Goldsmith and Thomas Rowe
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Description:
Influenza A H7N9 as viewed through an electron microscope. Both filaments and spheres are observed in this photo.

2009 H1N1 Flu

Generic Influenza Virion’s Ultrastructure

PHIL ID #11822
Photo Credit: Illustrator: Dan Higgins, CDC
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Description:
This picture provides a 3D graphic representation of a generic influenza virion’s ultrastructure and is not specific to a seasonal, avian, or 2009 H1N1 virus. Note the key to the right identifying the virion’s surface protein constituents. See PHIL 11823 for an uncut view of the virion’s exterior.

2009 H1N1 Flu

Generic Influenza Virion’s Ultrastructure

PHIL ID #11823
Photo Credit: Illustrator: Dan Higgins, CDC
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Description:
This picture provides a 3D graphic representation of a generic influenza virion’s ultrastructure and is not specific to a seasonal, avian, or 2009 H1N1 virus. See PHIL 11822 for a view of this virus in which a portion of the virion’s protein coat, or “capsid”, has been cut away, revealing its inner nucleic acid core proteins, as well as a key identifying the organism’s protein constituents.

2009 H1N1 Flu

Negative stain EM image of the swine influenza

PHIL ID #11215
Photo Credit: C. S. Goldsmith and A. Balish, CDC
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Description:
Negative stain EM image of the 2009 H1N1 influenza A/CA/4/09

2009 H1N1 Flu

Negative stain EM image of the swine influenza

PHIL ID #11214
Photo Credit: C. S. Goldsmith and A. Balish, CDC
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Description:
Negative stain EM image of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A/CA/4/09

Legionella (Legionnaire′s Disease)

Legionella pneumophilaPHIL ID #11152
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This image depicts a large grouping of Gram-negative Legionella pneumophila bacteria.

Clostridium difficile

Clostridium difficilePHIL ID #9999
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description: This micrograph depicts gram-positive Clostridium difficile bacteria from a stool sample culture obtained using a .1µm filter.

Salmonella Typhimurium
Salmonella

PHIL ID #10983
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts a colony of Salmonella Typhimurium bacteria.

Salmonella Typhimurium

Salmonella

PHIL ID #10971
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts a colony of Salmonella Typhimurium bacteria.

Salmonella

Salmonella

PHIL ID #10896
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts a colony of rod-shaped Salmonella sp. bacteria

Influenza virus particle

Influenza virus particle

PHIL ID #10073
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or “virion.”

West Nile Virus

West Nile Virus

PHIL ID #10700
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) depicts the presence of West Nile virus virions.

West Nile Virus

West Nile Virus

PHIL ID #10701
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This is a transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the West Nile virus (WNV). See PHIL 2290 for a black and white version of this image.

Group C Streptococcus

Group C Streptococcus

PHIL ID #10586
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) reveals a small clustered group of gram-positive, beta-hemolytic Group C Streptococcus sp. bacteria. See PHIL 10585 for a black and white version of this image.

Group C Streptococcus

Group C Streptococcus

PHIL ID #10591
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) reveals a small clustered group of Gram-positive, beta-hemolytic Group C Streptococcus sp. bacteria. See PHIL 10585 for a black and white version of this image

Measles

Measles

PHIL ID #10707
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This thin-section transmission electron micrograph (TEM) reveals a single virus particle, or virion, of measles virus.

Norovirus

Norovirus

PHIL ID #10708
Photo Credit: Charles D. Humphrey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) reveals norovirus virions, or virus particles.

Norovirus

Norovirus

PHIL ID #10709
Photo Credit: Charles D. Humphrey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) reveals norovirus virions, or virus particles.

Avian Influenza A H5N1

Avian Influenza A H5N1 viruses

PHIL ID # 1841
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
Colorized transmission electron micrograph of avian influenza A H5N1 viruses (seen in gold) grown in MDCK cells (seen in green).

Avian influenza A viruses do not usually infect humans; however, several instances of human infections and outbreaks have been reported since 1997. When such infections occur, public health authorities monitor these situations closely.

E. Coli

E. Coli Bacteria

PHIL ID # 10068
Photo Credit: Janice Haney Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicts a number of Escherichia coli bacteria of the strain O157:H7. This strain of E. coli is an emerging cause of foodborne illness. An estimated 73,000 cases of infection, and 61 deaths occur in the United States each year. Infection often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. Most illness has been associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Person-to-person contact in families and child care centers is also an important mode of transmission. Infection can also occur after drinking raw milk, and after swimming in, or drinking sewage-contaminated water.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis Bacteria

PHIL ID # 9997
Photo Credit: Janice Carr, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
This colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicted some of the ultrastructural details seen in the cell wall configuration of a number of Gram-positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. TB bacteria become active, and begin to multiply, if the immune system can’t stop them from growing. The bacteria attack the body and destroy tissue. If in the lungs, the bacteria can actually create a hole in the lung tissue. Some people develop active TB disease soon after becoming infected, before their immune system can fight off the bacteria. Other people may get sick later, when their immune system becomes weak for another reason.

HIV-1

HIV-1

PHIL ID # 10000
Photo Credit: Cynthia Goldsmith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Description:
Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding from cultured lymphocyte. See PHIL 1197 for a black and white view of this image.

Clostridium difficile

Medical illustration of Clostridium difficile