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Posts Tagged ‘AVO’

Bogoslof Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on July 10, 2017

KT-623D

Bogoslof Explodes: Volcano Alert Level Raised to WARNING, Aviation Color Code to RED

AVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice
Volcano: Bogoslof (VNUM #311300)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Previous Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: RED
Previous Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Monday, July 10, 2017, 12:51 AM AKDT
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
Location: N 53 deg 55 min W 168 deg 2 min
Elevation: 492 ft (150 m)
Area: Aleutians

Volcanic Activity Summary: An eruption began at Bogoslof volcano at 07:47 UTC on July 9 (23:47 AKDT on July 9) lasting about 5 minutes followed 15 minutes later by a second explosion that lasted about 7 minutes. A small ash cloud has been detected in satellite data. Winds are towards the southeast. The Aviation Color Code is upgraded to RED and the Volcano Alert Level to WARNING. Ash trajectory models indicate that a possible trace ash fall could occur on Unalaska, but unlikely to affect Dutch Harbor.  https://www.avo.alaska.edu/

Nearby towns:

  • Unalaska 61 mi (98 km) SE
  • Nikolski 76 mi (123 km) SW
  • Akutan 93 mi (149 km) NE
  • Saint George 194 mi (312 km) NW
  • Anchorage 835 mi (1,343 km) NE

Cleveland Volcano
Color Code ORANGE / Alert Level WATCH

Pavlof Volcano
Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Hawaii Volcanoes

Kilauea Volcano
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

  • FIRE-EARTH Ref:  LMP7
  • FIRE-EARTH Science Team’s July VolcanoWatch Report is available via FEPS.
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Alaska Flights Grounded amid Continued Activity at Pavlof

Posted by feww on June 5, 2014

VOLCANIC HAZARD
SCENARIO 07
.

Regional Airline Cancels Alaska Flights

Plumes of smoke, steam and ash from Pavlof continue to reach heights  of about 7,500m (24,000 feet),  according to Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO).

Meantime, PenAir, a regional airline, canceled flights from Anchorage to  Cold Bay and Dutch Harbor on the Aleutian Islands on Wednesday.

pavlof 3jun14
Pavlof eruption with lava fountaining, early June 3, 2014, as viewed from Cold Bay. Photo credit: AVO/ Robert Stacy.

So far, no ash has reached any of local communities, according to AVO.

LAST ACTIVITY REPORT: ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY

Thursday, June 5, 2014 5:16 AM AKDT (Thursday, June 5, 2014 13:16 UTC)
UPDATED by FIRE-EARTH at 13:35UTC

PAVLOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312030)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Two strong explosions were recorded in seismic data early this morning (10:05 and 10:45 UTC; 02:05 and 02:45 AKDT) at Pavlof. Lightning was detected by the WWLLN system but there is no indication of higher altitude ash in satellite data. Meteorological cloud tops are up to 29,000 ft. ASL and winds are to the west-southwest.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014 12:14 PM AKDT (Wednesday, June 4, 2014 20:14 UTC)

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Seismicity remains stable and unchanged in the past 24 hours. Persistent elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images. FAA web camera views yesterday afternoon showed a towering steam plume above the vent and lower-level ash from pyroclastic flow activity on the north flank. Wind direction has shifted in the past 24 hours to a more westerly direction and recent satellite views show a plume rich in SO2 gas, steam, and minor ash extending variably between 30 and 100 km downwind and passing over Cold Bay. There have been no reports of ash fall in Cold Bay or any other community. Incandescence from lava fountaining was visible in early morning web camera images, however low-level weather clouds obscure more recent views.

Alerts at Other Alaska Volcanoes

  • Shishaldin: Color Code: ORANGE/ Alert Level WATCH
  • Cleveland: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY
  • Veniaminof: Color Code YELLOW / Alert Level ADVISORY

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

Related Links

Posted in environment, Global Disaster watch, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, volcanic eruption, volcanism, Volcano Hazard, volcano images, Volcano News, Volcano Watch | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Pavlof Eruption Intensifies

Posted by feww on June 26, 2013

Alaska’s Pavlof Volcano ejects a plume 28,000 feet asl

Pavlof is erupting vigorously, exhibiting strongest seismic activity detected so far this year, characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent explosions suggesting lava fountaining and ash production, Alaska Volcanoes Observatory (AVO) reported.

The wave of intense activity started late on Monday and continued into Tuesday, with trace ash fall reported in the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano.

AVO Daily Update  – Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 12:33 PM AKDT (Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 20:33 UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code:   ORANGE
In its daily briefing AVO said:

Vigorous eruptive activity indicated by a distinct increase in seismicity beginning around 6:50 UTC (22:50 AKDT) last evening is continuing. The level of seismicity for the past 11-12 hours has been the strongest seismic activity detected so far during the 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The seismicity is characterized by intense, continuous tremor and intermittent small explosions that are likely associated with lava fountaining and ash production.

  • A distinct plume extending to the west of the volcano rising as high 28,000 feet above sea level (a.s.l.) according to Satellite data and pilot reports.
  • Satellite imagery also show strong thermal signals at the volcano summit.
  • AVO received a report of trace ash fall on the community of King Cove about 30 miles southwest of the volcano on June 25, 2013.

pavlof 7jun2013
Pavlof volcano, as viewed from Cold Bay on June 7, 2013. Photo credit: Robert Sigurdson, via AVO.

At this level of unrest it is likely that lava fountaining and ash emission are occurring. Lava fountaining is likely producing spatter-fed lava flows that are descending the flanks of the volcano over ice and snow and could be producing substantial steam plumes. These plumes probably contain variable amounts of ash. At the level of unrest observed over the past 11-12 hours, the volcanic plume has not been particularly ash rich; however, this could change if the character of the eruption changes and it remains possible for more robust ash plumes to be generated at any time. AVO is monitoring the eruption closely and will issue further information as it becomes available.

Mount Pavlof, one of the most active volcanoes in the U.S.,  has been erupting since May 13, spewing ash and lava at a low intensity.


Index map showing the location of Pavlof and other Quaternary volcanoes on the Alaskan peninsula. Volcano(es): Alagogshak, Amak, Aniakchak, Basalt of Gertrude Creek, Black Peak, Chiginagak, Cone 3110, Cone 3601, Dana, Denison, Devils Desk, Douglas, Dutton, Fourpeaked, Frosty, Griggs, Iron Trig cone, Kaguyak, Katmai, Kejulik, Kialagvik, Knob 1000, Kukak, Kupreanof, Mageik, Martin, Novarupta, Pavlof, Pavlof Sister, Rainbow River cone, Steller, Stepovak Bay 1, Stepovak Bay 2, Stepovak Bay 3, Stepovak Bay 4, Trident, Ugashik-Peulik, Unnamed (near Ukinrek Maars), Veniaminof, Yantarni. Credit Janet Schaefer/AVO

Veniaminof Volcano Activity [Source: AVO]

Continued volcanic tremors  suggest that the Veniaminof Volcano is still erupting, said AVO. Recent satellite images  show elevated surface temperatures at the intracaldera cone; webcam images from Perryville show a light-colored plume rising above the rim of the intracaldera cone, some 8,200 feet a.s.l.

It is possible for activity at Veniaminof Volcano to increase above its current level at any time and more vigorous ash emissions may result. Sustained periods of volcanic tremor may correspond with continuous ash emission which may not be detected in satellite data, especially if ash plumes remain below 15,000 to 20,000 feet above sea level. Brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions with ash fall limited to areas on the flanks of the volcano are likely to occur while the volcano is at its current level of unrest. A larger explosive episode and associated ash emission is not expected at the current level of unrest; however, this remains possible and would be evident in seismic and satellite data.

Current Volcanic Activity [as of June 26, 2013]

Alaska 

Cleveland YELLOW ADVISORY
Pavlof  ORANGE  WATCH
Veniaminof ORANGE  WATCH

Kamchatka Peninsula

Gorely YELLOW
Karymsky ORANGE
Kizimen ORANGE
Tolbachik ORANGE
Bezymianny YELLOW
Sheveluch ORANGE

Kurile Islands

Chirinkotan YELLOW

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Global Disasters/ Significant Events – 17 May 2013

Posted by feww on May 17, 2013

Pavlof continues to erupt amid near continuous seismicity

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
Location: 55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W,
Summit Elevation: 8261 ft (2,518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Lava is fountaining at Pavlof summit, as the volcano continues to erupt, spewing continuous ash, steam, and gas cloudd to an altitude of about 20,000 ft above sea level, AVO reported.

This morning the cloud was carried to the southeast. Satellite images show persistent elevated surface temperatures at the summit and on the northwest flank, commensurate with the summit lava fountaining and resulting lava flow.

Seismic activity remains elevated with nearly continuous tremor recorded on the seismic network.

Pavlof in eruption 16 May 2013
Pavlof in eruption, May 16, 2013 at 04:00 PM AKDT. Photograph courtesy of pilot Theo Chesley/ via AVO

Pavlof in eruption-2-16 May 2013
Pavlof Volcano erupting on May 16, 2013. Photo taken from about 6,000 ft, at 10:20 am, by pilot Theo Chesley. This view is looking at the north side of Pavlof; the peak in the foreground is Pavlof Sister. Image courtesy of the photographer via AVO.

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Other Global Disasters/ Significant Events

Cyclone MAHASEN Damaged or Destroyed Thousands of Homes in Bangladesh

At least a million people had been forced to flee low-lying coastal areas as the cyclone approached. However, the storm weakened rapidly prior to landing.

  • Nevertheless, it damaged or destroyed thousands of homes, mostly mud houses, and left dozens of people dead, including more than two dozen from  Myanmar.

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“Monster” Tornado Left 13 Dead or Missing, Destroyed Scores of Homes

The deadly tornado struck a subdivision of Rancho Brazos, near the town of Granbury in  Hood County, N Texas with winds of up to 200 miles per hour, and was rated EF4 by the National Weather Service (NWS).

  • “This tornado was a monster,” said Hood County Commissioner. “It’s just devastating.”
  • The tornado left at least 13 people dead or missing, with about 50 others injured, destroyed more than 120 homes, and displaced over 250 residents.

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Iraq Violence: 100 Killed, Hundreds more Wounded in 3 Days

At least 47 people were killed and many dozens wounded in two explosions in Baquba, a city located about 50 km north of Baghdad, and Madain located further south, reports quoting local  police said.

  • Since Wednesday May 15 about 100 people have been killed and hundreds more wounded in bombing campaigns across Iraq.

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S China Storms Affect 2 million people, Dozens Dead or Missing

“Ten provincial localities in south China have been affected by the fresh round of storms and flooding that began on Tuesday, including Anhui, Chongqing, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi and Sichuan,” said a report.

DISASTER CALENDARMay 17, 2013  
SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN:
1,030 Days Left 

Mass die-offs resulting from human impact and the planetary response to the anthropogenic assault could occur by early 2016.

  • SYMBOLIC COUNTDOWN: 1,030 Days Left to ‘Worst Day’ in the brief Human  History
  • The countdown began on May 15, 2011 …

GLOBAL WARNINGS

Global Disasters: Links, Forecasts and Background

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Second Alaska Volcano Erupts

Posted by feww on May 16, 2013

Pavlof ejects ash and steam, as lava flows down its NW flank

Pavlof Volcano, the second Volcano in the Aleutians to become active, began erupting on Monday and was still spewing clouds of ash and steam on Wednesday, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said.

The volcano has been emitting intermittent dark clouds of ash and steam rising up to 20,000 feet a.s.l. and drifting in a northeasterly direction, the observatory said.

  • Mt Cleveland, the other currently active Alaskan volcano, has been erupting intermittently since 2011.
  • Volcanic ash from Pavlof and other Alaska volcanoes could pose a threat to air traffic in the region.

Pavlof Activity: Color Code ORANGE  – Alert Level WATCH

  • PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-) 55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W
  • Summit Elevation:  2,518 m (8261 ft)

pavlof
Pavlof Volcano in eruption. View is from the southwest in Cold Bay. Lava fountaining is visible near the summit, and steam and ash clouds rise from the northwest flank where a lava flow advances down the slope. May 14, 2013 11:26 AM AKDT. Credit: Rachel Kremer/AVO

Pavlof location map
Index map showing location of Pavlof volcano and other Alaska Peninsula volcanoes.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

Cleveland location map
Location of Cleveland volcano and other Aleutian volcanoes with respect to nearby cities and towns.  Credit: Janet Schaefer/AVO

The following report is mirrored from AVO

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Wednesday, May 15, 2013 12:40 PM AKDT (May 15, 2013 20:40UTC)

PAVLOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-03-)
55°25’2″ N 161°53’37” W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The eruption of Pavlof Volcano continues. Elevated seismic activity persists and a steam and ash cloud are visible in web camera images rising occasionally up to about 20,000 ft. above sea level. A diffuse ash plume was reported late last night at an altitude of 15,000 above sea level and extending downwind to the northeast for up to 100 miles before dissipating. A recent pilot report today indicated a dark ash cloud extending east-northeast at an altitude of 20,000 above sea level. National Weather Service issued a Sigmet yesterday that remains active today.

Residents of Cold Bay, located 37 miles southwest of the volcano, observed incandescent glow at the summit during the night. Pilot reports and photographs from yesterday afternoon indicate that the lava flow extending down the northwest flank is still active and has generated debris-laden flow deposits, presumably from interaction of hot lava with the snow and ice on the flank.

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
52°49’20” N 169°56’42” W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Elevated surface temperatures continued at Cleveland Volcano over the past 24 hours. No explosions have been detected by regional infrasound data. There has been no further information about the lava flow.

Sudden explosions of blocks and ash are possible with little or no warning. Ash clouds, if produced, could exceed 20,000 feet above sea level. If a large ash-producing event occurs, nearby seismic, infrasound, or volcanic lightning networks should alert AVO staff quickly. However, for some events, a delay of several hours is possible. Cleveland Volcano does not have a local seismic network and is monitored using only distant seismic and infrasound instruments and satellite data.

AVO will continue to monitor these volcanoes and issue additional information as available.

Code Definitions
ORANGE Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway with no or minor volcanic-ash emissions [ash-plume height specified, if possible].

WATCH: Volcano is exhibiting heightened or escalating unrest with increased potential of eruption, timeframe uncertain, OR eruption is underway but poses limited hazards.

VOLCANO INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET: http://www.avo.alaska.edu
RECORDING ON THE STATUS OF ALASKA’S VOLCANOES (907) 786-7478

CONTACT INFORMATION:
John Power, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

Jeff Freymueller, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
jeff.freymueller@gi.alaska.edu (907) 378-7556

Posted in Global Disaster watch, global disasters, global disasters 2013, Significant Event Imagery, significant events, significant geophysical disturbances, Volcanic Activity Report, volcanic eruption, volcano, volcano alert | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

60 pct Chance Redoubt May Erupt

Posted by feww on March 18, 2009

Redoubt Activity – Color Code ORANGE : Alert Level WATCH

Redoubt Volcano Latest Observations

Local time: March 17, 2009 1705 AKDT (March 18, 2009 0105 UTC)
At 2009-03-17 16:30:56 AKDT AVO Reported:

Seismic activity low and marked by small discrete earthquakes. Partly cloudy satellite and HutCam views show no sign of activity.


View of Redoubt steaming on March 15, 2009, taken by David Wartinbee, from Soldotna, AK.
via AVO. Image courtesy of the photographer.

Current Status and Observations [Mirrored from AVO]

Seismic activity at Mount Redoubt increased at about 1:05 AKDT Sunday afternoon (March 15, 2009) and approximately 4 hours of continuous volcanic tremor ensued. The onset of the tremor was associated with a small explosion that produced a plume of gas and ash that rose to about 15,000 feet above sea level and deposited a trace amount of ash over the summit-crater floor and down the south flank of the volcano to about 3,000 feet. AVO responded to this increase in activity by raising the color code and alert level to ORANGE/WATCH at 2:50 PM AKDT. At this time it does not appear that the increase in activity heralds a significant eruption in the short term, but conditions may evolve rapidly.

An AVO overflight Sunday witnessed activity from 11:30 AM until about 3:00 PM and was able to document ash emission from a new vent, just south of the 1990 lava dome and west of the prominent ice collapse feature near the north edge of the summit crater. Although ash emission was short lived, it represents the first documented ash fall during the current episode of unrest at Mount Redoubt.

About twenty minutes after the initial steam and ash burst, a sediment-laden flow occurred from a small area in the ice at about 7000 feet on upper Drift glacier. This flow descended about 1500 feet and produced a distinctive seismic signature seen across the Redoubt network.

Although the intent of the overflight was make airborne gas measurements, only a few such measurements were possible due to the uncertain nature of the activity and potential for further ash emission. The measurements that were made indicated at least a qualitative increase in SO2 emission relative to levels measured previously. The gas data are currently being processed and will be available soon.


Photograph taken during observation / gas data collection flight to Redoubt Volcano on March 15, 2009 [
13:10:28 AKDT] Image Creator: Bill Burton; courtesy of AVO/USGS.

Interpretation of New Activity and Possible Outcomes
Although preliminary, it is likely that the plume observed just after 1:00 PM AKDT on Sunday, March 15, 2009 was produced by a steam explosion in the shallow hydrothermal system of the volcano. Without examination of the ash we cannot say with certainty if the ash represents new magma or if it is merely pulverized old material from the surface of the volcano.

Steam-driven explosions are not unexpected events at Redoubt given the amount of heat that is being released at the surface. It is possible that more such explosions can occur with little or no warning. It is possible that these plumes can reach above 20,000 feet, and may contain minor amounts of fine ash.

Relatively rapid increases in seismic activity, and an overall waxing and waning pattern to the seismicity at Redoubt may persist for weeks to months. Increases in seismicity may or may not be associated with other volcanic phenomena, such as minor ash emission, and vigorous steaming. The burst of activity at Redoubt on March 15, 2009 indicates that the volcano is still in a restless condition.

AVO plans to visit Redoubt later this week to attempt collection of ash samples, retrieve GPS data and do some routine maintenance of seismic and other equipment.

AVO has resumed 24 hour per day staffing of the AVO operations center in Anchorage. http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Redoubt.php


Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano and its reflection in the waters of Cook Inlet. View is to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. Photograph by J. Warren, April 21, 1990. Source: AVO

FEWW believes there’s a 60 percent probability Redoubt Volcano may erupt violently this year, possibly by July 2009.


Related Links:

Posted in eismicity at Redoubt, hydrothermal system, Mount Redoubt, SO2 emission, steam explosion | Tagged: , , , , | 1 Comment »

Redoubt’s ‘Phantom Unrest’ Could Lead to Eruption

Posted by msrb on October 4, 2008

Alaska Volcano Observatory

Information Statement – Friday, October 3, 2008 10:37 AM AKDT (10:37 UTC)

Redoubt Volcano

  • Type of Volcano: Stratovolcano
  • Coordinates: 60°29’7″ N 152°44’38” W
  • Summit Elevation: 10197 ft (3108 m)
  • Recent Eruptions:1902, 1966-68, and 1989-90
  • Location: Western side of Cook Inlet, about 170 km southwest of Anchorage and 82 km east of Kenai, Alaska
  • Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL

Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN


Annotated photo of Redoubt Volcano from the north, including features seen on 27 September, 2008.
Picture Date: September 27, 2008 – Image Creator: Kate Bull – Image courtesy of the AVO/ADGGS.
Full Size

What’s up at Redoubt?

Starting September 16, reports of strong hydrogen sulfide odor and loud noises coming from the direction of the volcano were reported. AVO observation flight on September 27 revealed:

  • A number of fractures and circular openings in the upper Drift glacier for the first time.
  • Scientist noted a strong hydrogen sulfide odor, but onboard instrumentation recorded no sulfur dioxide.
  • Fumaroles on top of  domes formed in the 1968 and 1990 eruptions showed more vigorous steaming than the last observation in mid-August.
  • AVO’s seismic network detected no abnormal earthquake activity, despite the earlier reports.

AVO believes Redoubt’s increased fumarolic activity and presence of sulfur odors do not suggest an imminent eruption, despite similar observations being made in the  months preceding the 1989-1990 eruption, when seismicity also increased significantly. AVO expects a similar strong increase in seismicity first before an eruption occurs.

Notes:

In the 1989-90 eruption lahar traveling down the Drift River partially inundated the Drift River Oil Terminal facility. Ash plumes produced during the same eruption affected international air traffic with traces of ashfall falling on Anchorage and nearby communities. (AVO)

Posted in Drift glacier, Drift River, Drift River Oil, fumarolic activity, Seismicity | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »